Emergencies in the classroom?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by dgpiaffeteach, Nov 1, 2014.

  1. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Nov 1, 2014

    The other thread made me curious, how many of you have ever had a real emergency in your room?

    I've only had one. I had a student with seizures, and the student had one in my class. It was pretty scary, even though I knew what to expect. I felt helpless since there wasn't much we could do except make sure everything was clear and s/he was breathing.

    We've also had other students with seizure disorders, but I haven't had any of them. We've had a few other incidents where a squad was called too.

    A school I interviewed with had a school shooting the year after my interview. It scared me to think I could've been teaching there, but I learned a lot after speaking with some friends in the area about what to do.
     
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  3. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    Not in the classroom, but we have had cases in which an ambulance needed to be called when a student has been injured at recess. In the past two years, we've also had two instances when an epi-pen needed to be administered--one staff member and one student. All staff are trained in administering an epi-pen and we have several staff members trained in first-aid and CPR.
     
  4. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Our tv caught on fire and kind of exploded while the kids were watching a movie. The overhead lights were out and it was kind of spectacular.
     
  5. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I assisted a colleague when one of our shared students had a long-lasting seizure in the colleague's classroom. After I got the other students situated in another teacher's classroom, I returned and helped move desks out of the way so that the student wouldn't injure herself. I also called 911 once it became clear that the seizure was not subsiding on its own (this was in the student's IEP). By the way, I totally got in trouble for making the decision to call 911, even though the other teacher had called the nurse three times, hit the panic button twice, and sent a student to the office for assistance--no one came to help.

    One of my students had an asthma attack in my classroom. I tried to help calm the student while we waited for the nurse to show up. The nurse ended up calling an ambulance. The student was eventually fine.

    Once we had a pack of coyotes running wild on campus. They were in the area of my portable classroom. I think that counts as an emergency, although they didn't eat any students or anything. :lol:
     
  6. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    As some of my students would say, "I have a connection!" At my previous school, there was a mama skunk and her babies living under one of the portables. When they came out of their home, it was treated as an emergency situation!
     
  7. monsieurteacher

    monsieurteacher Aficionado

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    Yikes MrsC! I almost stepped on a skunk coming out of my in-laws a few weeks ago... I'm still terrified.

    I don't think I've had emergencies in my classroom. We had to stay in one day because there was apparently a bear reported in the area...
     
  8. Ms.Blank

    Ms.Blank Companion

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    I remember my elementary school going on lockdown in 5th grade...we stayed two hours after school and took turns calling our parents on the phone. Evidently, there was an armed robber running around in the area where my school was. Nothing came of it, but better safe than sorry.

    In college, a girl had a seizure. The teacher was really great and moved all the furniture out of the way. I remember an ambulence took her away (she had nothing on her medical records that showed she had ever seized before, so they took extra precautions even though the seizing stopped on its own).

    Both times, I felt very safe with my teachers. I only hope I can be as calm as they were if I ever have to deal with emergencies.
     
  9. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    We have training on what to do in various medical emergencies and around 25% of our staff (me included) are trained 1st aiders. Thankfully in the UK we are not troubled by school shootings. Seizures are a regular occurrence in my school and this means that the staff and the kids are well briefed in what to do. We keep detailed records of the various medical conditions our kids have and the 1st aiders know how to deal with them. My record for 999 calls (The UK equivalent of 911) for an ambulance is 4 times in 1 week for 4 different kids! In my school in a medical emergency the teacher would deal with the kid in the first instance whilst sending reliable kids to neighbouring classrooms to get other adults to help with the rest of the class and if there is no 1st aider one will be sent for.
     
  10. donziejo

    donziejo Devotee

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    A wolf-pack chasing deer on the playground. Snakes in the classroom. Our head custodian deals with the invasion of critters and bugs year round. No emergencies in my classroom. Well, a fist fight once. My students ran to get help as I had the other students exit the classroom.
     
  11. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    The only emergency I've had in my room (other than vomiting) is a seizure. A student had one last year, and she had no history of seizures. Two other teachers were in the hallway (it happened right outside my classroom door), so it was really nice that they were there to help her, and clear my class out of the way.

    The most ridiculous thing, though, is that the doctors said that she didn't have a seizure, and she was just dehydrated. They just came from lunch, though, and it was winter, so it's not like she was running around and sweaty. There was no doubt in any of our minds that it was a seizure-it was the textbook definition of one. It took her mom 2 hours to come and pick her up and take her to the ER, so maybe all of the signs were gone by then? It was just frustrating, because I was really worried for her, and it just seemed like it was being dismissed as nothing.
     
  12. P Chang

    P Chang Companion

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    Interesting thread. I'm not yet a teacher, but I am CPR, AED, and First Responder certified. I was a deputy sheriff prior to beginning to pursue a teaching career, so I am trained in things like response to an active shooter.
     
  13. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    P Chang, if you ever decide to work at an urban school or a court school, these skills will definitely set you apart.

    We haven't had any emergencies yet, but we must be prepared for them every day. We have a large gang affiliated student population, and it's always possible that someone tries to retaliate, coming from the outside.
    A lot of our juveniles are charged with adult charges, so even though they're still kids, they don't always act like it.

    We do have 2 armed probation officers on staff (not always there though) and about 20 or so probation officers across the street at juvenile hall and they hear our radios, so I feel somewhat safe.
    As far as medical emergencies... I don't know what I would do, I'm not CPR certified (as far as I know in Cali it's not required in secondary schools), but our campus is so small that it takes less than a minute to walk across, probably 20 seconds running.
     
  14. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    We've had a couple of lock downs due to police activity in the area. In one instance police with their guns drawn were right outside my classroom window.

    I had a student have a severe asthma attack while on an overnight camping trip. Nothing quite like a middle-of-the-night ambulance ride with a student. It was a really scary situation, especially when a guy from the back comes up to tell the driver that he needs to speed up.

    I also had a student have a severe anaphylactic reaction on the first day of school.
     
  15. P Chang

    P Chang Companion

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    While a deputy, I cross-trained as a corrections officer at the county's Drill Academy (Marine-style juvenile detention program that housed the offenders for 6 months) and worked there at least once a week on the day I would have otherwise been off duty. Most offenders there were gang members.

    After a few years as road patrol deputy, I interviewed for the Gang Unit and got that job, where I worked as an investigator. One of my duties was to train school staff on gang recognition so they'll know if any of their students are going down that path (especially important for middle school teachers, as their students are more easily steered away from the gangs whereas high school students are generally in too deep).

    My county had at least one cop at every public school (even elementary schools) and two cops at every public high school. Crazy that is needed, but these are strange times we live in.
     
  16. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    I have had a few times of seizures in the classroom. I have been the teacher in charge on the yard twice when children put their teeth through their lip, not fun. I have had the vomit, a kid with a ridiculously high fever, and a child in crawling intense pain (I found out later she had gotten a bug stuck in her ear). Lots of dogs on campus. Then the other emergency of a crazy angry child tearing apart the room so every other child needs to be removed for safety.
     
  17. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    My top three:

    1. Having to use an EpiPen on someone.
    2. My principal and I had to physically restrain two parents who were fighting in the office.
    3. A child choking during lunch. My worst nightmare came true!
     
  18. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    I have been that student in crisis, now that I think about it (some of you would have HATED me as a student). The worst was the time I had an utter nervous breakdown in English class. That teacher did absolutely everything right. She pulled me quietly out of class when she realized I was about to go from crying to sobbing. She probed enough to realize that I was dealing with a terrible situation outside of her class and out of her control. She called for an aide to take me to the school psychologist (really good call on her part since I hated my guidance counselor and she knew it) and to make sure my parents were called immediately. She followed up with the psychologist and my parents before the next school day, and made sure I was seeing my own therapist within the next 24 hours.

    That may not have been a life-threatening emergency, but it might have escalated into one without quick intervention. Her reaction not only got me through that day, but it made me determined to get through that crisis. There were others like me who needed teachers like her, and I wanted to be one of them, if possible. So far, I have personally intervened with students dealing with cutting, suicide, and abuse. They have that teacher to thank.
     
  19. bros

    bros Phenom

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    I've also been that student in crisis - had a seizure in 11th grade math near the end of the year (middle of June). It was a ~90 degree day. We were doing a giant packet of worksheets for the Geometry final. Then I started to feel tired, and then for some reason, I put my laptop case on my desk, then I began to experience my typical seizure symptoms, and thought "darn it."

    Then I lost consciousness and fell out of my desk and I woke up about 15 seconds later to my math teacher lifting me slowly off the floor, while yelling at a kid to go to the nurse's office because the main office wasn't responding to the call button in the classroom.

    The nurse confused my emergency card with my brother's (he is 3 inches taller and ~100 pounds heavier than me) and she thought I was just dehydrated, even though I kept insisting to her that I had epilepsy and I had suffered a seizure she refused to believe me. It was odd. That nurse retired like four years later.
     
  20. Mr. Nobody

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    One of the scariest was when I was at the reading table and I heard a loud BANG! and I look up to see one of my students flat on their back with their desk pinning the child to the floor. That one really scared me.

    Another time a child came running into my room. Before I could react, their parent came tearing in behind the child and began to viciously attack them. That was also scary.
     
  21. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I had a kid with EBD once that got so mad she ran over a mile and a half away from the school and was weaving in and out of traffic- My principal and I had to chase her the entire way! I guess the the thing about adrenaline kicking in is true- at the time I hadn't run AT ALL in about 10 years but I wasn't even tired/didn't notice how far I was running. That's about the closest thing to an emergency that's ever happened!
     
  22. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I was the emergency once! In my first year teaching I was having a conversation with a parent just outside of my classroom. My kiddos were all silent reading in the classroom and I passed out in the middle of the conversation I was having. Someone called an ambulance, but by the time the paramedics arrived I was okay. I taught for the rest of the day.
     
  23. Bunnie

    Bunnie Devotee

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    I had a child accidently fling a ziploc bag of books into another childs face. Needless to say my classroom looked like a murder scene because the kid was spewing blood everywhere from his face. I had all my kids run to the class next door, and I called for my supervisor. I made the kid bleeding everywhere go into our classroom bathroom and my supervisor helped clean him up. He was. Totally fine after a few minutes. No open wounds. My classroom though has huge puddles of blood everywhere. My bathroom had blood splattered all over the walls.

    Til this day I had no idea where all the blood came from. His nose? His mouth? No idea.
     
  24. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Most likely the nose. The nose tends to bleed quite a bit.
     
  25. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Not an emergency, but it could easily have turned into one. We had a tornado warning right at the end of the school day. We had to hold the buses and keep the kids late. The storm ended up making a sharp turn and touching down in the county just south of us, where it totally destroyed the elementary school. Thankfully, they were able to let out a little early and get most of the kids home, but there were several still at school who were saved by the quick thinking of the principal and several teachers. That REALLY rattled me...
     
  26. blazer

    blazer Connoisseur

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    Biggest emergency in my career.

    Field trip to France with year 7 (6th grade in your money). The group included one girl with nut anaphalaxis, one diabetic who is also coeliac and another with epilepsy. 4 staff on the trip, 2 of us first aiders. I had to go on a training course before we left on how to manage the diabetic regarding the auto injector device she wore.

    2nd night there and in the evening her blood sugar levels were at 25 units (should not be higher than 9). She adjusted her insulin pump and an hour later we checked again. Now it was so high the reading was off the scale! A telephone call to mum was made and she talked me through giving her daughter an insulin injection. The I set my alarm to go off each hour so that I could go and check on the girl and so she could check her blood sugar. I didn't need the alarm as mum rang me every hour for updates. Anyway by 3am we had the readings down to below 15 and by breakfast she was back to normal.
     

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