ELL and Special Education

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by scarletta21, Oct 18, 2005.

  1. scarletta21

    scarletta21 New Member

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    Oct 18, 2005

    Hello All,

    I am a student teacher sent to do an assignment by posting a topic on line in hopes that a professional (this is where you come in), will help and discuss with me all your knowledge and wisdom.

    Currently, my topic revolves around ELL who are hearing impaired or have speech problems. I would like to know how would you go about modifying/handling your classroom with these students? What strategies would you suggest and why? Have they worked for you and are there any futher reccomendations?

    Replies are greatly appreciated and if anyone wants to give me better notes on a better discussion question, I would appreciate the help.

    Do it for the kids!
    Scarletta, CA
     
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  3. missmiss

    missmiss New Member

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    Oct 19, 2005

    ell/sped modifications

    Hi there,

    I am a special ed teacher. All but one of my students are ELL and all have the label of MR (most have Down syndrome).

    I have found a few things to be helpful:
    - 1 step directions
    - songs to learn common words, numbers, days of the week, etc
    - scripted speaking games (ie. hot potato: when the music stops, students say "i have the ball" and "she has the ball") This gives my students confidence with full sentences
    - I do not give my students all the supplies they need for an activity, but make them ask for what they need. for example, if we are cutting, I give them the paper and then say it is time to cut. I ask them what they need and then go around with the box of scissors, having each student ask for the color they want. this is a bit time consuming, but has made my kids SO much more vocal in the past few months of doing so.
    - label objects around the room and refer to them
    - give kids time to speak and then repeat what they said to assure them I understand
    - draw pictures (or have pictures of basic tasks laminated to stick on the board) to illustrate tasks and help clarify written instructions.

    hope thats helpful
     
  4. scarletta21

    scarletta21 New Member

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    Oct 27, 2005

    Thank you for your reply to my message. I am sorry that I have not gotten back to you. I am finishing my last week of student teaching. After your reading your post, I really like the ideas you gave me.

    I also have some questions that I would like to ask you (hope you do not mind). I was wondering if you find any time constraints in any of your ? Are the any complications with working with these students (besides their disabilities, any other factors?)?

    Hope to hear from you soon.

    Thank you!
     
  5. missmiss

    missmiss New Member

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    Oct 27, 2005

    I dont exactly know what you are asking. It definitely takes a little longer to do all these things. Like i said, i teach an MR class, so my students are not typically developing students with language deficits; they have developmental delays. so, i expect that we will need significantly more scaffolding and repetition than an SLD or gen ed class.
    I significantly modify the gen ed curriculum that I do use because my students have such sparse language skills. They almost always draw a picture before writing and all write with assistance.

    Its definitely just way more work than i ever thought, before i started teaching spEd. Absolutely every lesson needs visuals and hands-on materials, even if it just means holding plastic or laminated letters.

    im not sure if that answers your question. let me know if it doesnt.
    :)


     
  6. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Oct 27, 2005

    Hi there! I am on the opposite end... I am an ELL teacher (well, I am a classroom teacher, but I am the first classroom after a K-3 immersion) and I have several students with disabilities. One of my students has a severe disability and a 1 to 1 aide all the time. Several of my students have LD.

    I think the hard thing is to know if the gap is because of the language or because of a disability. Because I have the K-3 team in my same building, we can consult on how they did in their native language.

    That being said, I use sign language in my classroom, and I also have sentence strips up so the students can tell me, "I ate breakfast at home," "I need to eat breakfast," "I brushed my teeth already," or "I need to brush my teeth."

    For my students with disabilities, sometimes things are modified- instead of using a complete sentence, they are able to use a partial answer. I will echo the correct response and then they will have to repeat it back to me. I give these students a lot of concrete practice.

    I also think that sometimes ELL strategies lend themselves to helping kids with disabilities (word banks, language scaffolding, etc).

    Can you clarify your questions some more?
     
  7. scarletta21

    scarletta21 New Member

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    Oct 27, 2005

    Sorry about the last reply post I left. But my questions were about time constraints. I was just wondering how missmiss was able to have students ask her for everything they need with the amount of time that is allotted. But from what she posted, I assume her class does not run on time limits. Which makes me wonder about how missmiss schedules time for each activity/ subject matter for the day for her students?

    Thank you for helping me with my questions (both of you). Teaherpippi and Missmiss, my questions that I wanted more help on are: How do you go about assessing these students (are your assessments modified for ELL or special education students)? Especially for you Teacherpippi, because you mentioned that sometimes it is hard to decide if it is a language barrier or disability issue. And after the assessments are made, do you find yourself modifying your strategies and approaches on achieving a goal/objective(s) with those students? Can you two ladies give me any examples, I really appreciate all your help.

    One last question is based on the standards. Do you both teach to the standards? And if so, how do you it? I know I am asking questions that may sound obvious but I do not know so I need to ask.

    Is this more clear? Sorry if it is not. I will explain more.
    Thank you!
     
  8. missmiss

    missmiss New Member

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    Oct 28, 2005

    I have a lot of liberty with the schedule of my class. It is elementary and self-contained. However, we do stick to a regular schedule because both the kids and I like routine. We generally spend, for example, 45 minutes on writing. That includes all the asking. I have 9 students and 3 aides (a classroom and a 2 1:1 aides), so there are enough of us to work closely with each child. I do teach to standards. There are 2 ways that i do so. My class is 2-5th grade with almost all my students in the 4th adn 5th grade. In core areas (math and english) I teach them at their ability level. Right now that is mostly K and 1 standards. I cannot, obviously, teach them to write paragraphs until they are writitng full sentences. So, in those areas, their IEPs are modified grade level goals. For example, if the 5th grade standard is read and respond to grade level appropriate text, then my students IEP goal may be to listen to and respond to questions about comprehension-level text, with teacher prompting. SO, that is the way my instruction is standards based. I test them and track their completion of K-1 and these modified standards.

    we definitely spend far more time on each standard than a gen-ed or SLD class would. My students do not generalize knowledge well. SO, they need to see everything taught in a number of different contexts. students with learning disabilities, developmental delays and even just language-learners need more time to respond to questions. if you give your students time to speak (which often means a 30 second pause while they formulate a response), they will feel more comfortable and are more willing to speak.

    My students also access grade-level material in areas like science, ELD and PE. FOr these, I either send them out with an aide, in pairs or blend my class with a gen ed class. My students will hear the same material and see the same demonstration as their grade-level peers. However, I pre-teach and then we go back to our room and re-teach with ability-level vocabulary, visuals, repetition.

    My students enjoy interacting with their grade-level peers, but need to be instructed, for the most part, at ability level, which are lower grade-level's standards.

    I assess 1 on 1, standard-by-standard a few times a year. I tend to use teacher-made assessments with a lot of visuals. Because my students, for the most part, are not fluent readers, all assessments are oral and visual. As far as showign progress/achievement of IEP goals, I prefer to site teacher observations and work samples. So, I date and make notes on student work (usually about 3 samples per standard) to show whether they have achieved the goal. I put notes on the work to explain the level of independence with which they completed the task.

    we are in california. my students do not take the same gen ed standardized assessment, but all take the CAPA.

    Again, my classroom is a mild-moderate setting, but definitely on the moderate end, so I employ not just accomodations but a lot of modifications to the gen ed curriculum.

    Also, I request that all my students attend intercession classes with me while we are off-track so that they get an extra month of instructional time.

    hope that helps,
    :)
     
  9. teacherpippi

    teacherpippi Habitué

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    Oct 28, 2005

    Do you have the ability to have them assessed in their native language? This, by far, has been THE most accurate tool I have used.

    Do I modify strategies? OHHHHH yeah. All the time! I am continually modifying things. My lesson plans are always being adjusted. Sometimes we need to stop because there is just no background knowledge in an area. Sometimes, they know something, but just don't have the English word for it.

    Can you get a native speaker to come in an help you? I have a teacher's aide during math, and sometimes she will explain a concept in their language before a new unit. That way, it helps to recall background knowledge. When I introduce new vocabulary, I try to do so with pictures or drawings and have them attach a word with a picture or drawing because their translation into their native language might not be right (and sometimes things just don't translate!)


    Yes, we have standards, and I teach to them. I have to tell you... I don't use a text book very much....

    For example, my students had to learn about the Bering land bridge. We could read a book on it, but the vocabulary would be above ALL of my students. So, we took some clay, some colored water and made our continents and land bridge. We added some "glaciers" (frozen water in tupperware) and then actually *watched* the glaciers melt and the sea level rise.

    We brainstormed a list of words together and wrote them on the board. Then, I gave an example verbally of what I wanted the kids to do (tell about what happened with the land bridge). I sent my high-level students off to brainstorm and start their rough draft.

    Then I worked with the rest of the students and we wrote a short paragraph together. After that, I sent off my middle students to write a paragraph on what happened.

    I was left with my 2 LD students, my 1 intensive student. These students have already gotten a lot of information in many different ways. I have my two students with LD each pick 5 important words. Then I sent my intensive student off with his 1:1 aide to work on copying those words (part of his IEP).

    The last two worked on writing 5 sentences using the words they picked as important.

    The result? I have several items up outside my room that show what happened on the land bridge- everything from a 5 paragraph paper to 5 words copied. I also have students who can tell a parent or elder about what happened on the land bridge.

    I document this and put it in their file.

    One of the standards is to know what happened to the land bridge. There is an ENTIRE section in our social studies book about it, and we did read it (about 2 weeks after the experiment). The state standard said KNOW about it, not READ about it.

    I don't know if this helped at all, but I try to modify while still staying as close to the standard as possible.

    ....and I LOVE hands-on activities!
     
  10. zolar16

    zolar16 Rookie

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    Nov 3, 2005

    I use:
    - Sign language paired with verbal language
    - Lots of visual cues (picture flashcards, Mayer-Johnson's Boardmaker). I also draw pictures on my whiteboard or on a big piece of construction paper (whichever's easier at that time) to help students understand unfamiliar words.
    - Books on tape and CD-ROM
    - Songs to teach days of the week, months of the year, numbers, ABCs, body parts, almost anything :)
    - Cloze sentences with pictures. Example:
    I want to eat _________ for lunch.
    Have 2-3 pictures they can choose from. (pizza, a cheeseburger, spaghetti)
    Emphasize the words as you touch the pictures. When a student makes a
    choice, praise them enthusiastically, especially if they repeat the word or attempt an approximation.

    These are all methods I use with my students with autism. When a child has little to no receptive language and speech delays, it's very similar to a child who really understands another language: they just don't understand English very well, but they can learn with intervention.
     
  11. Bittywell12

    Bittywell12 Rookie

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    Nov 18, 2005

    teacherpippi:.... I have a few questions for you if you dont mind. I am a student and I have to do a interview on a teacher that has ELLs in their classroom. I was curious if you would answer these 3 questions for me if possible adn provinde me with any other help ful info that you think might help.
    1. What type of documentation must you keep record of on your ELLs?
    2. What do you like about having to keep this documentation and what do you dislike about having to keep this documentation on your ELLs?
    3. What would you change about the documentation process if you could? Or would you keep it the same?
    **And what grade do you teach?? :) Thanks
     

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