Effects of Student-Teacher Placement

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by Luke8Ball, May 28, 2012.

  1. Luke8Ball

    Luke8Ball Rookie

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    May 28, 2012

    Hi all!

    In the coming months, I'll have to decide on a school I'd like to student-teach at. Most people at my university just do random placement; however, I was wondering if I should choose the school I'd like to eventually get a job at? This school also happens to be my former high-school. The principal will likely remember me because it's a small school and I was valedictorian a few years ago. Will these factors influence my ability to get the job?

    Thanks!
     
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  3. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    May 28, 2012

    I don't know about elsewhere but we basically had no choice in our placement. We could rank our top four choices but it didn't really mean anything. Most people ended up getting something other than their top choice. I was really upset at first about my placement because it wasn't in an ideal school but it wound up being hands down the best experience I could have had. My cooperating teacher was excellent!

    We could have a teacher write a letter requesting us as their student teacher but even that wasn't a guarantee.

    As far as job opportunities, I have no idea. I do know a couple people who were hired after student teaching but most were not.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I think that you should do your student teaching in a school that you're not familiar with. Go for the random placement.
     
  5. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    We had no say in where we were placed.

    I'm almost thinking that it could hurt your chances to get a job elsewhere if you are so centered on one particular school. I would go with a random placement.
     
  6. Luke8Ball

    Luke8Ball Rookie

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    Thanks for the input! Sounds like I should start fresh and go with random placement. It's probably better to not know the administration anyway!
     
  7. jenglish97

    jenglish97 Devotee

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    May 28, 2012

    I would have to agree with the other posters. It is better to be randomly placed. The more you are exposed to different schools and setting the better you will be as a teacher. You will have the opportunity to experience what you like and do not like in other schools.

    Good luck!
     
  8. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    No say at all and found out a few weeks before the semester. Although I found out the year before because I happened to sub in the school and the secretary told me. I did request a close district though because I didn't drive.
     
  9. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    We could either apply for a specific placement (or 2), or leave it to the luck of the draw. We were not allowed to teach at our former schools.
     
  10. teachart

    teachart Comrade

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    Although most people have no say, I was able to choose my 2 student teaching placements (because they requested me.)

    I would NEVER want to go with a random placement. I am going to work with two teachers I've had field placements with, so I know that they will be good at mentoring me.

    I've had placements at plenty of other schools, so I'd rather be able in an environment I'm familiar with and know I can thrive in.

    However, I wouldn't choose a school just because I wanted a job there. If I didn't have any teachers I wanted to do student teaching with, I would choose random placement instead.
     
  11. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Hmm, I guess I would disagree with everyone else- I'd go where I thought I had a chance of getting a job- if I really thought there was a good chance there. Do you know for a fact that there will be an opening in your field in your former district when you're finished with your ST? Otherwise, I don't think it really matters...if they don't have an opening, obviously they can't hire you. The district I attended almost always hired grads of that district, so if I knew there was an opening there and I was allowed to ST there (we weren't allowed to pick, and it was too far from my college anyway) I would totally go for the job opportunity. If you don't know of any openings though, you're better off in a random district where there might end up being openings. I would agree that it would be a better experience to go to a new school and something you'd learn more from, but coming from an area where there are so few jobs that you might as well be trying to win the lottery, I'd do anything in my power to try to set myself up to secure a job. If you have a great ST experience in a random school but can't get hired, your great ST experience doesn't really help you out any.
     
  12. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    May 28, 2012

    In my area, you are not allowed to student teach at a school you attended unless it had been 10 years since you graduated. You may check in to the policies on your area.
     
  13. Luke8Ball

    Luke8Ball Rookie

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    I'll be teaching high-school math, so there are nearly always openings at some point in most schools. Since I want to create a professional distance from my students since I'll be rather young, perhaps it is best to be unfamiliar with all of the students and parents.

    So, it seems to be the consensus that most student-teachers don't end up with a job where they taught? (Regardless of reason)
     
  14. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Quite a few of our student teachers have landed jobs at the school... but it's a rather small area with a college churning out math and science teachers. And a district that has great difficulty holding on to teachers.
     
  15. AlwaysAttend

    AlwaysAttend Fanatic

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    Same accept it didn't matter how long ago it was.
     
  16. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    It could potentially hurt your chance of teaching there. Remember that you will be new, and will make lots of mistakes. Some districts aren't as understanding of that, and will be critical of you in observations. I'd almost say to practice teaching somewhere you aren't as interested in working.
     
  17. HOPE-fulTeacher

    HOPE-fulTeacher Comrade

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    I say either go with a random placement or else look into a few other districts that you might like or might be hiring. I wouldn't student teach at the same high school you went to (which at my college wasn't allowed anyway).

    You want the other staff members to respect you and see you as a professional, and if they had YOU as a student a couple years ago, I think it'd be really hard for them to do that.

    You also want students respecting you, and besides only having a few years in between you and them (which would be the case anywhere), you might know a lot of them as siblings of friends or kids of family friends. Imagine teaching your friend's little brother (and needing him to now take you seriously) or having to talk to your parents' friends about the fact that their child isn't doing well in your class. (Not that it'd happen...just giving an example.)

    My :2cents: is that I wouldn't like it, but it depends on what you think you'd be comfortable with.
     
  18. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 28, 2012

    As someone else mentioned, we were also not allowed to student teach in the school district we graduated from.

    And to make a counterpoint on those who suggested knowing so you have a good mentor- I somewhat disagree. Having a bad cooperating teacher is not the end of the world. Mine was H.O.R.R.I.B.L.E. and we did NOT get along well. However, it was a great learning experience on how to get along and work closely with someone you don't particularly care for. I did not get a good letter of recommendation from her (it was very generic), but I did enough volunteering to get several good letters. :2cents:
     
  19. acl1974

    acl1974 Companion

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    May 28, 2012

    We weren't able to pick our own placement, but since I was going to be in my final trimester of pregnancy during student teaching they were having trouble placing me. I totally understood teachers not wanting to have me take over their class with the chance that I would go into labor early and cause chaos with their plans. I contacted my old high school and a teacher there agreed to take me on. It had been more than 15 years since I graduated and the teacher was my age so she wasn't in the school when I went there, which is the only reason my university let me do it there. There is a rule that people can't do student teaching at their old high schools unless they're older than dirt and no one will remember them. Anyway, I did my student teaching last year and had only a couple of weeks left when I had the baby. I was able to take a month off and then finish those two weeks. Anyway, they have a couple of positions open and I have my fingers crossed that I'll at least get an interview. We'll see. It sounds like your case is a little different and they'll remember you. If that's true, I think that could only help you in the future when applying at that school.
     
  20. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    May 28, 2012

    I got a job in the district that I student taught in, but not at the specific schools I was at. I actually got married and moved right before student teaching to make it easier to find a job-but I was coming from a different state. Before finding out I could student teach in a different state, I was planning on student teaching with my 5th and 2nd grade teachers. I think it was actually a good experience for me to be with teachers I didn't know.
     
  21. teachart

    teachart Comrade

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    May 28, 2012

    I've had my fair share of placements that were not a good fit, I feel confident in my ability to work well with others! Maybe I would feel differently if I got to do a year long student teaching placement like the elementary ed majors do. In art we have two 7 week placements for student teaching - it just isn't enough! This way I already have a great relationship with the teachers, know the schedule and procedures, and will be able to jump in sooner. The worst thing I could imagine would be getting placed with a teacher that never lets you take over- and I know plenty of people who've had that situation. I say do what feels right to you, set yourself up for success!
     
  22. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    I would definitely agree that if you have a specific teacher you know you can work with, go with that one. There are just so many horror stories, and getting a good recommendation from student teaching is so important. If you don't have outside teaching experience (which most people in college don't), then how else are you going to get hired? I had an absolutely awful placement my junior year. Luckily it wasn't my full time student teaching yet so I didn't need a recommendation for hiring- had it been, this woman probably would have ruined my chances at ever getting a job. I can say I learned a lot of what NOT to do in a classroom in that placement, but I am very glad it wasn't my FT placement not only due to the recommendation thing, but b/c I felt I needed to see a really good example too- an example of what one should do to have a well-run classroom. This woman would literally do things like tell me I'd be teaching a small group of 6-7 students about x topic, and then when I showed up, tell me I'd be teaching the whole class with no explanation or apology. In that same day, she'd invited the literacy coach in to "back her up", and of course the literacy coach was saying things like, "Well, you didn't even bring enough materials for the whole class..." as if I was some kind of idiot. I could write paragraphs about the stunts she pulled...including contacting my university and literally trying to get me pulled from the program. She was not satisfied with the number of hours I'd been in her classroom, so I did two weeks of extra teaching to try to appease her, and then in my evaluation she claimed she'd brought all these concerns to me and I did nothing about it. Luckily, I'd gotten smart and gone to my adviser and explained exactly what was going on, and exactly what I was doing to remedy it, so when she said that they knew it was a complete lie and threw it out of my file. I was extremely lucky to get a great CT for my FT placement, but I can just imagine what would have happened otherwise. I have a friend who didn't get a letter of rec from her CT and she's still looking for a job- she gets interviews, and they always ask her why she doesn't have her CT as a reference. In this job market, it's just so important to do everything right that I would do anything I could to make sure I had a good experience and set myself up to get hired in the future.
     

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