Educating myself out of a job?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Allie, Jun 7, 2009.

  1. Allie

    Allie New Member

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    Jun 7, 2009

    Hi Everyone,

    I am an aspiring teacher. I just applied to Graduate school to get my masters while also getting my license to teach business and marketing in high school. I have been warned not to "educate myself out of a job." I do not have any teaching experience, just corporate training experience. Am I making the right choice to go back to school to get my masters, or am I going about this in the wrong way?

    Thank you for any advice you may have!

    Allie
     
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  3. PreKyay

    PreKyay Companion

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    I think that administrators value real-world experience as well as teacher training programs. Don't discount your life experiences and certainly not the knowledge you have in the content-specific areas in which you are planning to teach.

    As far as the benefits of getting your master's --I would like to see more feedback on that as well!
     
  4. rachaelski

    rachaelski Habitué

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    I have 2 master's degrees and I am starting my PhD in the fall. I have not had trouble finding a job. Some districts may not count a graduate degree that does not deal with education. My first year of teaching I had a master's in International Affairs. Though I was teaching English/Language Arts, my P put me on the master's pay scale. As I searched for jobs this year, Ps seemed impressed with my resume. If questioned I explain that I value education, giving and receiving. The day I stop educating myself is the day I should get out of education.
     
  5. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

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    Well put RS!
    It's all up to you. If you want the experience NOW, then put the Masters on hold and get the teaching in. You can do both. Take the Masters online and meanwhile STUDENT TEACH. You see what it's like, AND decide if it's REALLY what you want to do? Good luck with your decision.
    Rebel1
     
  6. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    The forever question: does having a masters and no experience make you less employable because you may be more expensive?

    You will find opinions on both sides.

    I came to public school with a masters and experience (from teaching at the university level and at a private school) and both were honored on the salary schedule.

    Do what feels right to you, the answer will always be a debate.
     
  7. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jun 8, 2009

    In this economy, schools are looking to save money.

    There's a steep learning curve in teaching; that first year can be rough. There's no way to tell which new teachers will be successful and which won't; education alone doesn't seem to determine it.

    So many districts would much rather gamble on a first year teacher with a BA than an MA.
     
  8. mollydoll

    mollydoll Connoisseur

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    Many districts in Virginia state on applications that they give preference to candidates with masters degrees. I suspect this is something that varies widely across the country.
     
  9. ANGRY AL

    ANGRY AL Companion

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    Districts in eastern PA, even in good economic times, look for the cheapest hire. From people in my administrative courses, I've learned that, ideally, they want to hire a young woman with a bachelor's and zero to one year experience. It is their expectation that she will leave within five years to start a family and they can hire someone else at that point at entry level salary again.
     
  10. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    Many of the colleges I've looked at for Masters require that you have 2 to 3 years of teaching experience. And I have been told by other educators and professors that it is better to wait a few years and then go back to get your Masters. It has nothing to do with educating yourself--- schools NEED well-educated teachers, however, money wise it's an issue. Most schools don't want to pay you more money just because you have a Masters. They would prefer that you have experience AND a Masters degree--- experience either as a teacher or person with a background in the content you'll be teaching.
     
  11. JennM

    JennM Rookie

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    Jun 9, 2009

    I agree with KA Alum. Getting your Masters in Teaching is like a double-edged sword. Some districts will LOVE you, because you went that extra mile to get the higher degree, while others just don't want to pay the extra money for you. In my opinion, though, the market for teaching is getting so competitive right now that eventually, it will be customary for teachers to have their Master's. In other words, it will be unusual for teaching candidates to stop at their BA's. Who's knows how long it will take for society to get to that point, but at least you will be prepared!
     
  12. TeachEnglish

    TeachEnglish Rookie

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    Jun 9, 2009

    I'm debating the master's question myself, and this is what I've decided: The job market sucks (I just got laid off twice), so why not go back to school? I'm going to start by just getting an endorsement in ESL (I'm already certified in HS English), then hopefully start my masters in a type 75 (administration). From what I hear, the really rich districts want people with a masters because it makes them look better and they can easily afford it. The districts that are looking to save money may be more inclined to hire a teacher without a masters. It'll take a few years to get it, so in the meantime you can claim you're either working on it or you don't have it yet.
     
  13. Mom2two

    Mom2two Companion

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    I have always been told to get tenured first, then get your masters. That's what I plan to do...
     
  14. skittleroo

    skittleroo Connoisseur

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    I can only speak about how it is where I live - in DFW area. I have never had districts not want me because I am too educated. Here, if you have a master's (which I do), you only get paid $1000 - $1500 more per year. You don't get a master's for the increase in pay. You get it because of your desire to improve yourself. It does make you more marketable and gives you a leg up on advanced opportunities.

    the whole hiring new people every few years doesn't make sense because districts will pay way more to train those teachers properly. Now I have heard of a few rare cases of teachers that have taught for 30 years being done that way, but not for those with a few years under their belts.

    If I were you (and I was in that position), I'd start working, get a year under my belt, and then start grad school. That is what I did and still graduated after less than 4 years teaching. It can be done and I have 6 kids of my own.

    I started looking for a job with a better district this year. Having a master's helped me get the job I wanted. But then again I was applying to a district that requires you to get a master's - this district values education. Anyways, i really don't think you can go wrong investing in yourself.
     
  15. Michelle

    Michelle Guest

    Jun 9, 2009

    If one is teaching English, is a master's in English a bad idea? Or is a master's in administrations preferred?

    Since the outlook is grim right now for new teacher hires, I'm considering returning to get my master's in English with a concentration in Composition and Rhetoric. Would I be better off with a master's in teaching/administration/education?
     
  16. TeachEnglish

    TeachEnglish Rookie

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    Michelle, it depends on what you want to do. After teaching two years and working in supervisory positions outside of schools I know that I eventually want to be a department chair, assistant principal, or principal. So that's what I'm getting my masters in, but if you don't want to be an administrator then doing that as your masters would be pretty pointless. If you do composition/rhetoric, you are opening the door to possible junior college positions, but in my area (Chicago) it doesn't mean you can teach more areas. If you want to make yourself more marketable, think about drama, speech, journalism, or ESL. If you don't know what you want to do, try teaching for a year somewhere and then deciding. What about private schools, they're usually less competitive because the pay is so much lower and the benefits are a lot worse. Hope this helps you a bit.
     
  17. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jun 9, 2009

    One thing that may make you a lot more marketable: Speech and Debate. Most forensics coaches are either English or Social Studies teachers; I was a rarity as a math teacher.

    It can be hard to find forenisics coaches!! The hours are long; around here there are tournaments almost every weekend from late September to Memorial Day.

    I'm fairly sure that my forensics background got me my first math teaching job. Sure, I knew I was destined to be a great math teacher. But the principal hiring me saw the opportunity to fill an impossible-to-fill position, and also get the math teacher she needed.

    On the west coast, the prevalent league is the National Forensic League. Take a look at their membership roster, and be sure to mention your willingness to coach at any school that might have (or want to start) a team.

    I just PM'd you some of their contact info.
     
  18. Doug_HSTeach_07

    Doug_HSTeach_07 Comrade

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    Jun 9, 2009

    Ding ding, we have a winner. I think it's a great idea to start a masters program for many professional reasons but also because the requirement is coming sooner or later.
     
  19. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    NY state has been there for quite some time. And I'm sure we're not the only ones.
     
  20. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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    What are you going to get your Masters in? Marketing/Business or is it a masters in education that also provides you with a license.
     
  21. tiki7719

    tiki7719 Companion

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