ed. schools...stigma? help please:)

Discussion in 'High School' started by ajg2612, Oct 1, 2007.

  1. ajg2612

    ajg2612 New Member

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    Oct 1, 2007

    I'm currently working on a term project--for my MAT program in Secondary English Education--that seeks to explore incongruities between secondary English education and English in academia (college and university settings). In particular, I'm interested in the stigma attached to Secondary English Ed programs within the larger context of university and college settings. I'd like to explore the implications that this stigma has for both teaching and learning: how does this affect the college-level learning atmosphere and pre-service teachers? (How) does this stigma later translate in classroom practice?
    If anyone has any thoughts, contradictions, etc. on the above issues, please post!:)
    Thank you!
     
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  3. JessicaKellin

    JessicaKellin Rookie

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    Nov 17, 2007

    I suppose I just have some thoughts to add, though I would add that history can suffer a similar stigma. I am a history education student but the way my education program works, I am taking many classes with secondary education students of all subjects. I have several close friends who are secondary English ed. - I think that there is a stigma with English in general that it is very liberal, artsy, impractical, etc. One friend who is an English major, but not interested in teaching, told me that she chose a major she loves and one day she will be living in a box. She dramatized obviously, but there is some truth there. Like I said, I think English in general, and possibly the humanities in general, have a stigma for being impractical, thus teaching English (or history) can be seen as impractical.

    Good luck with your term paper!
     
  4. ajg2612

    ajg2612 New Member

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    Nov 17, 2007

    Thank you so much for the reply (and I can definitely see how the stigma transgresses disciplines).
    Wish you the best!
    -Alana
     
  5. Enigma_X

    Enigma_X Rookie

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    Nov 28, 2007

    Well, I can share my experience.

    My ultimate goal has always been to be a college professor, so I wanted to do in undergraduate school what would most help me get into and succeed in grad school. I looked at the lists and realized that the secondary English education degree was several English classes short of the regular English degree. I conferred w/ my advisor (who also happened to be the head of the English department), and then decided to pursue a tradiotional English degree w/ an emphasis on literature. The secondary English education degree is seen as "watered down" by academics. I also found that even still some of my professors were disappointed by my decision to teach a while before graduate school, as though that somehow tainted the purity of my dedication or whatever. Another aspect: I think it also has to do w/ education and English being in two entirely different colleges within the university. They were constantly contradicting each other and blaming the other school for any problems I was having resolving the incongruencies.
     

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