eager child refusing to take turns

Discussion in 'Kindergarten' started by jwu88, Nov 23, 2008.

  1. jwu88

    jwu88 New Member

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    Nov 23, 2008

    I have a student who is very bright and always eager to participate. However, his eagerness is becoming an issue because he does not like to take turns with other students when answering questions; many times he will just shout out his answer. I'm a first year teacher and can definitely use some advice from other teachers on this issue.
     
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  3. Lumi

    Lumi Companion

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    Nov 26, 2008

    I have two kids like this this year. Whenever they blurt out the answer, I give them a warning and tell them that if they do it again they will have to "move their clip down" (their clip being part of my classroom management system). Then I remind them to "put a bubble in their mouths" and put their hands in their laps. I also remind them of the importance of raising their hand to tell me the answer. Then to reinforce this, you model for them and raise your hand right after you ask someone a question. You can also reinforce a closed mouth by the bubble (blown up cheeks) or by raising one hand and covering your mouth with your other hand. I've found that technique works pretty well. I won't call on anyone to answer the question unless they have their hand up and their mouth covered. Also, I make the differentation between when I say, "everyone...?" and that means I want everyone to say the answer or "....Blake?" when I only want Blake to answer the question. A lot of times I will say somehting like, "Your name isn't Blake" to someone who blurts out the answer. And then I will talk about how it's so unfair to take the answer out of Blake's mouth and say it for him. Finally, you can also reward the class for remembering your rules about blurting out. Tell them at the beginning of your teaching time that for every X minutes they as a group can go without blurting out an answer, they will all get X reward. For my class it would be a marble in our marble jar which is our whole group reward system (once they earn 100 marbles we get some sort of reward, extra recess, popcorn, popsiccles, a movie, something like that). But of course, you can only do that once you have lots of practice with the individuals who are doing most of the blurting out. One other thing you can do is have your blurters sit right next to you and if they blurt out, you stop what you're doing and physically, gently... and calmly place one of their hands over their mouths and the other hand up in the air. Then the very next time they do it right, make sure to call on them and give them lots of praise for doing it the way they're supposed to.
     
  4. jwu88

    jwu88 New Member

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    Nov 30, 2008

    those are super helpful suggestions, I will definitely try the "bubble in their mouth" and "hand over mouth with the other hand raised." Is there ever a time when you had to remove someone from the group because it was a constant distraction to your instructional time? I've only removed this child twice from group time all year but I hate having him miss it.
     
  5. Lumi

    Lumi Companion

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    Nov 30, 2008

    Yes, I do still have to occasionally remove a child from the group but I always have them sit in a chair that's near the group situation so they can still listen and participate by watching. Also, I sometimes have my aide come up and sit with the group on the floor and that seems to help them settle down considerably having an extra adult there for crowd control.

    You might also consider implementing a positive reward system too. Sometimes if I have a very difficult class to control (not my problem this year, thankfully) I will bring in a bag of mini marshmallows and give one to each child who remembers the rule of raising hands and not shout out. Everybody loves marshmallows so they will all do it. If you don't want to give sugar consider something else (depending on food allergies, of course) like a goldfish cracker or a raisin. I've also done candy corn and smarties. One roll of smarties goes a long way since they have so many little pieces in them.
     
  6. Blue

    Blue Aficionado

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    Dec 1, 2008

    You might set up a system of anwering that pre-determines who is going to answer the question. For example, call upon the children one desk as a time, or one table at at time.

    Practice waiting until called upon to answer a question.

    The whole school experience is so new and exciting to some children that they are overwhelmed by all the rules, and can't remember them. They are still egocentric.
     

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