Dyslexia?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by princessbloom, Nov 12, 2014.

  1. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Nov 12, 2014

    Obviously none of us are doctors. Clearly we cannot "diagnose" children. I have tried every roundabout way of informing a parent that her child has some sort of disability (without using that word). Mom freaks out with her low test scores and will email me in a panic once every 2-3 weeks. I've sat down with mom on SEVERAL occasions. She mentioned that she was going to get her tested (?) but is not following through, despite me checking up on her. I'm in a private school so we do not test. My school is unfamiliar with diagnoses of any kind.
    Having come from public, I've seen a lot of kids with learning disabilities.

    Mom keeps freaking out on ME like it's my fault. I tutor the child twice a week and work with her in small group in Reading and Math, differentiated.

    Here is a checklist of information about the child, of which I've mentioned to mom.
    -she is inconsistent with how she grasps concepts. One day she has it, the next day it's completely gone.

    -when she speaks she talks in circles and never gets to her point.

    -she lacks vocabulary. she often refers to "things" "whatchamacallit"

    -she goes way off topic when talking or answering a question.

    -her independent functioning level at anything is poor. She needs a lot of assistance from teacher and redirection to do her work.

    -She has difficulty following oral directions.

    -Her work and handwriting are messy.

    when i brought the previous 2 up to mom she acted like she has never noticed this at home. I don't get how she couldn't.

    Mom says she does all homework by herself with little to no help. I seriously do not understand how that is possible.

    Please help. My admin isn't much help. I'm considered to be the "senior" person in this area at school since I have prior experience, though I'm not expert.
    From what I just know about other ESE kids I've had (who had IEP's and were pulled out), it seems to be along the lines of dyslexia? Or some other language-based learning problem.

    May I get a more seasoned person to chime in?
    How do I get mom to understand, or at least to calm down and listen to me?
    What else can I do?
     
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  3. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Nov 12, 2014

    Definitely not an expert here. In fact, one of the reasons is why I don't want to teach elementary is because I wouldn't want to have the responsibility of catching things, (signs of learning disabilities, etc) or actually missing them.

    But what little I do know about dyslexia, this does not sound like it. I could be wrong of course.

    How old is this child?
     
  4. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Nov 12, 2014

    8. :)
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 12, 2014

    Could be a language processing issue. The child's local school district might be able to provide screening? Not sure...I know we screen in district preK kids...
     
  6. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Nov 12, 2014

    It sounds more like a processing issue.

    I had a student one year with dyslexia. She was very bright, followed directions well, and could comprehend things extremely well when being read to. She showed typical signs of dyslexia, like struggling to relate letters and sounds, writing backwards (her name was almost always written backwards), very low reader, etc. She could segment sounds and say "/c/-/a/-/t/" but when told to put it together, would say something like shritma.

    I know there are different types of dyslexia, but, in my experience, it doesn't sound like your student is dyslexic.
     
  7. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Nov 12, 2014

    I did think processing at one point too, but dyslexia kept creeping up in my mind.

    Never heard of public schools taking on private for testing? Interesting. I'll have to find out about that.
    I just wish I could get her on board and to stop getting so frustrated with ME.
     
  8. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Nov 12, 2014

    PS-I mention dyslexia because I have seen dyslexia manifest itself in other ways aside from just writing things backwards.
    This student has a tendency to do that, but I've seen worse. It's mostly numbers, and she does have strange phonetic spelling!
    But I'd say it's probably more processing.

    Any suggestions on what I can tell mom? She wants to meet again. I'm doing my part, but I kind of feel like I'm beating a dead horse with what I'm saying to her.
     
  9. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Nov 13, 2014

    It does not sound like dyslexia. I'd say it is something more in the vein of an auditory or language processing disorder - maybe some issues with expression as well.

    With regards to public schools evaluating students in private schools:
    IDEA regulation

    Sec. 300.131 Child find for parentally-placed private school children with disabilities.

    (a) General. Each LEA must locate, identify, and evaluate all children with disabilities who are enrolled by their parents in private, including religious, elementary schools and secondary schools located in the school district served by the LEA, in accordance with paragraphs (b) through (e) of this section, and Sec. Sec. 300.111 and 300.201.
    (b) Child find design. The child find process must be designed to ensure--
    (1) The equitable participation of parentally-placed private school children; and
    (2) An accurate count of those children.
    (c) Activities. In carrying out the requirements of this section, the LEA, or, if applicable, the SEA, must undertake activities similar to the activities undertaken for the agency's public school children.
    (d) Cost. The cost of carrying out the child find requirements in this section, including individual evaluations, may not be considered in determining if an LEA has met its obligation under Sec. 300.133.
    (e) Completion period. The child find process must be completed in a time period comparable to that for students attending public schools in the LEA consistent with Sec. 300.301.

    There is also this useful page from Wrightslaw

    Here is a useful letter from the US DoE, Office of Special Education Programs

    4. Require LEAs where private schools are located to conduct child find for children in private schools.

    Each LEA must locate, identify, and evaluate all children with disabilities who are enrolled by their parents in private, including religious, elementary schools and secondary schools located in the school district served by the LEA, in accordance with 34 CFR 300.131(b) through 300.131(e), 300.111 and 300.201.
    [34 CFR 300.131(a)] [20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(10)(A)(i)(II)]

    In carrying out the requirements of this section, the LEA, or, if applicable, the State educational agency (SEA), must undertake activities similar to the activities undertaken for the agency's public school children.
    [34 CFR 300.131(c)] [20 U.S.C. 1412(a)(10)(A)(ii)(III)]

    The child find process must be completed in a time period comparable to that for students attending public schools in the LEA consistent with 34 CFR 300.301. Such child find process shall be completed in a time period comparable to that for other students attending public schools in the LEA

    To summarize:
    The school district in which your private school is located in is responsible for evaluating the child and creating an IEP, in addition to providing any necessary services the child may require.
     
  10. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Nov 13, 2014

  11. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Nov 13, 2014

    I'd chime in that it's not hugely important that you identify (formally or informally) a particular label for what's going on - not only can you not legally do this (as you've mentioned), but it wouldn't really be helpful. Let's say you were 40% more sure it was CAPD - what would you then do that you haven't now? Sounds like you've already strongly suggested to the parent to seek advice from other qualified folks.

    In terms of whether it "is or is not" dyslexia - keep in mind there is no universally agreed upon definition. It simply means a discrepancy between expected and actual levels of reading performance, ruling out lack of instruction. Could be due to disorganized language processing, fluency with decoding, etc.

    Finally, knowing whether it would be considered dyslexia or not does not give you any additional ideas as to what would work in terms of interventions. There are no interventions out there which only work with dyslexia. Stick with skill identification and interventions known to address those specific deficits.

    A few suggestions:

    1) As bros suggested, public schools can test. Doesn't sound like the mother is taking advice regarding outside consults, but this may be an option that is more affordable and practical if the option is more clearly laid out by someone in your school qualified to do so. You don't have to suggest a specific disability or category of qualification - you could just say, there are additional services that may be available - this assessment could help determine what additional options are out there.

    2. With the mother, focus on very specific skill deficits of the child, very specific interventions you are implementing, and very specific data monitoring skill development. This will help her see that you are exhausting all resources at your disposal. If she asks for "more," you could always ask for suggestions as to what additionally could be done, then either do those things are explain why you can't (time, training, not effective, etc.).

    3. You can't please everyone. At the end of the day (or year, I suppose), she may just not be satisfied with what you've done. This is not ideal, but it's okay. Sure, you want to work with her as much as you can, but it's not in your control what she chooses to do. If you've done what you can, presented her with options, etc. be at peace with that, limit the amount of time and energy you give to her, and focus your time and energy on what you can achieve.

    Good luck!
     
  12. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Nov 13, 2014

    I wouldn't necessarily lean towards dyslexia; however, I would try to advise mom to seek an evaluation through the local public school district. I know that my district has tested private school students before.
     
  13. princessbloom

    princessbloom Comrade

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    Nov 13, 2014

    I contacted my old school today to ask the testing coordinator about this.

    Thanks everyone!
     

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