Dyslexia Teaching tips

Discussion in 'General Education' started by katie11, Aug 5, 2011.

  1. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2011

    Recently one of my student came to me with a question that she couldnt see board properly. she fails to remember subjects and lacks in confidence. I was much worried about her studies. I started to put extra efforts to make her study well and encourage her to gain self-esteem.
    I sit with her and make her read word by word. It takes three hours of extra class for me. But im doing for her future. I give her reading theraphy daily. Is there any other suggestion for Dyslexia.
     
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  3. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    Aug 5, 2011

    The New York Times just had an article about new research on dyslexia. I've put one interesting suggestion in bold type. I hope this helps!


    Study Says Dyslexia May Have Auditory Tie


    Many people consider dyslexia simply a reading problem in which children mix up letters and misconstrue written words. But increasingly scientists have come to believe that the reading difficulties of dyslexia are part of a larger puzzle: a problem with how the brain processes speech and puts together words from smaller units of sound.

    Now, a study published last week in the journal Science suggests that how dyslexics hear language may be more important than previously realized. Researchers at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that people with dyslexia have more trouble recognizing voices than those without dyslexia.

    John Gabrieli, a professor of cognitive neuroscience, and Tyler Perrachione, a graduate student, asked people with and without dyslexia to listen to recorded voices paired with cartoon avatars on computer screens. The subjects tried matching the voices to the correct avatars speaking English and then an unfamiliar language, Mandarin.

    Nondyslexics matched voices to avatars correctly almost 70 percent of the time when the language was English and half the time when the language was Mandarin. But people with dyslexia were able to do so only half the time, whether the language was English or Mandarin. Experts not involved in the study said that was a striking disparity.

    "Typically, you see big differences in reading, but there are just subtle general differences between individuals who are afflicted with dyslexia and individuals who aren't on a wide variety of tests," said Richard Wagner, a psychology professor at Florida State University. "This effect was really large."

    Dr. Sally Shaywitz, a director of the Center for Dyslexia and Creativity at Yale University, said the study "demonstrates the centrality of spoken language in dyslexia -- that it's not a problem in meaning, but in getting to the sounds of speech."

    That is why dyslexic children often misspeak, she said, citing two examples drawn from real life. "A child at Fenway Park watching the Red Sox said, 'Oh, I'm thirsty. Can we go to the confession stand?,' " she said.

    "Another person crossing a busy intersection where many people were walking said, 'Oh, those Presbyterians should be more careful.' It's not a question of not knowing, but being unable to attach what you know is the meaning to the sounds."

    Dr. Gabrieli said the findings underscored a critical problem for dyslexic children learning to read: the ability of a child hearing, say, a parent or teacher speak to connect the auditory bits that make up words, called phonemes, with the sight of written words.

    If a child has trouble grasping the sounds that make up language, he said, acquiring reading skills will be harder.

    The research shows that spoken language deficiencies persist even when dyslexics learn to read well. The study subjects were mostly "high-functioning, high-I.Q. young adults who had overcome their reading difficulty," Dr. Gabrieli said. "And yet when they had to distinguish voices, they were not one iota better with the English-language voices that they've heard all their life."

    Experts said the new study also shows the interconnectedness of the brain processes involved in reading. Many scientists had considered voice recognition to be "like recognizing melodies or things that are primarily nonverbal," Dr. Gabrieli said. Voice recognition was thought to be a separate task in the brain from understanding language.

    But this research shows that normal reading involves a "circuit, the ability to have all of those components integrated absolutely automatically," said Maryanne Wolf, a dyslexia expert at Tufts University. "One of the great weaknesses in dyslexia is that the system is not able to integrate these phoneme-driven systems" with other aspects of language comprehension.

    As a follow-up, the M.I.T. researchers have been scanning the brains of subjects performing voice recognition and other activities, and have found "very big differences in dyslexics and nondyslexics in a surprisingly broad range of tasks," Dr. Gabrieli said. "We think there might be a broader kind of learning that's not operating very well in these individuals and that in some areas you can circumvent it pretty well. But in language and reading, it's hard to circumvent."

    One of the unusual aspects of the M.I.T. study is that it isolated the skill of processing vocal speech from reading and from skills involving the meaning of language, experts said. The sentences were basic, like "The boy was there when the sun rose," and the Mandarin sounds meant nothing to the listeners.

    Dr. Wagner suggested that something like the voice-recognition task might be used to identify young children at risk for dyslexia.

    Often diagnostic tests require separating sounds from words. A child might be asked to say "cowboy" without the "boy" part.

    "For young children, it's a real difficult task," Dr. Wagner said. "Sometimes they'll say, 'cowboy without saying boy,' because that's exactly what you've asked them. The holy grail is to come up with tasks you can give to a 3-year-old."

    Dr. Shaywitz said the study also has implications for teaching.

    If a teacher asked, " 'Oh, Johnny, what is the capital of New York State?,' Johnny will go, 'Uh, uh, uh,' and the teacher will say, 'Oh, gee, you don't know it,' " Dr. Shaywitz said. "It's more likely to be a problem of word retrieval than knowledge. If she reframes it as, 'Is the capital Houston or Albany?,' Johnny is more likely to answer correctly."
     
  4. katie11

    katie11 Rookie

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    Aug 8, 2011

    thanks a lot Myrisophilist. This was so helpful
     
  5. TeachingHistory

    TeachingHistory Companion

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    Aug 8, 2011

    Some things I know from family members...

    Color code...highlighters and post it's will be her friend

    Chunk info so there is limited words in one location. Double or triple space EVERYTHING

    Visuals to go along with auditory. Books on tape when she is reading for a subject and not working on specific skills.

    When she's reading or looking at anything, block off (with post-its or paper or anything really) all extra images, words, colors, etc. You can actually take an index card or piece of paper and cut a window out to help her read.

    Use only one side of the paper, not front and back.


    Dyslexia is different for everyone, so what I have above may or may not work. Once she figures out how her brain works things will get easier and she'll figure out what she needs to do to adapt. If I think of anything else, I'll let you know.
     
  6. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Aug 8, 2011

    I love Sally Shaywitz. She's right on.

    The dyslexic children with whom I work have a very difficult time with phonemic awareness. Most of them. That's what's being referred to in the article. Look up phonemic awareness and see what you find.

    You can also look here:

    http://www.interdys.org/FactSheets.htm

    It's the website of the International Dyslexia Association's fact sheets. You'll find some good information there.

    One of the things research has proven to help dyslexic children read is sequential, systematic, multisensory phonics instruction like Orton Gillingham. It's what I do with my dyslexic students and it is amazing.
     
  7. Giggles1100

    Giggles1100 Comrade

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    Aug 8, 2011

    Does your school have the Kurzweil program? This is a computer based program that has thousands of books and text books on them and the student can read along on the screen as it reads to them, they can sped up or slow down the voice on the computer get definitins and sound them out, PLUS you can scan all your worksheets and tests into it and she can do her work on it.

    Also, provide a copy of all your notes to her, ask her if she prefers them typed or written in cursive, many like them written in cursive because when a word is written in cursive the letters cannot flip on them or reverse their order, the brain will not allow it.

    Allow her to use a computer to do her written work such as essays or paragraphs so she can learnt he value of spell check and if typing is too hard use the PC's Text to type function, you wil need a microphone for this but your tech dept should have one for you to use.

    Colored gels over her text or highlighters might or might not work, just depends on her brain. Every dyslexic is different.

    Orton Gillingham is a good program to use if she is in elementary or early middle school and is delayed to hep her in reading.

    If handwriting is hard for her, teach her cursive, again this helps with letter placement and keeping them from flipping on her. Also allow her to tell you or record what she wants to say before she writes it, because sometimes the process to get it on the paper from her brain is hard and they spend so much time trying to spell and get the words down correctly that they forget what they wanted to say.

    I teach at a private Special Needs school and just moved form HS to 5th and 6th grade and I find now if I can get to them younger HS is much easier for them but unfortunately the public school districts just don't have the time or money to be able to hire teachers to work with them one on one, they might have a dyslexia program they get pulled out and go into an hour a day and some kids thrive and do well in that like my son did but others have more of a struggle, so it is especially nice when they have a teacher like you that will take the time to help them out as well! Good Job!
     

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