DUI and getting a teaching job

Discussion in 'General Education' started by teacherteacher4, Jul 27, 2011.

  1. teacherteacher4

    teacherteacher4 New Member

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    Jul 27, 2011

    Hello all,

    I recently was arrested for a DUI. I have not had my court date but I have hired an attorney and I am hoping to get the charges reduced or dismissed. I know that it was wrong and I am not looking for a lecture. I am well past 21 and I barely blew over the legal limit. Not an excuse but I am a responsible person and I am accepting responsibility for my actions, however, I know that a steep battle is in front of me.

    My question is how will this affect my chances in getting a teaching job in California. I do not have anything else on my record (both criminal and DMV). I was recently hired as a teaching assistant and I am hoping that I am able to stay on at this school for the next few years but will I ever be able to work for a different district? Will this completely exclude me from the application pool even after my probation is completed and the DUI is expunged? (Yes I do know that a DUI is never completely removed from your record in California but you can still go through the expungement process). Thanks so much for any help you can offer. I have always wanted to be a teacher and I am hoping that this didn't destroy my chances forever.
     
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  3. kme93

    kme93 Companion

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    Jul 27, 2011

    I know that in Texas, you can even teach with a DWI felony. That said, I don't recommend getting one. :) A DUI should not hurt your chances for employment, even in another district. You will never be able to drive a school bus though.
     
  4. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jul 27, 2011

    I don't think it improved your chances, that's for sure. With a hundred or more other applicants competing against you for one position, I doubt that anyone would hire you with a DUI unless you have something really, really phenomenal to offer that the others don't.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    I agree with this answer. Altough (I believe- unless CA has some special law) you are still free to apply for positions, there are hundreds (probably more like thousands) of people that will be applying for the same job. When they have to narrow that number down to people they want to interview, I think a conviction would automatically put you in the "no" pile when there are so many applicants that don't have records. Also, any application I've ever filled out also asks if you've had anything expunged from your record, so you'd still have to list it even if you manage to do that. I think that's completely unfair and goes against the whole purpose of things being "expunged", but it is what it is.

    I think it's really sad that one little mistake could ruin your career forever, but unfortunately I believe it's a reality. You said you haven't been to court yet, so maybe there is a chance that your lawyer will be able to get the charges dropped. My best friend's fiance was pulled over for a DUI last year, but the charges were dropped in court since he was barely over the limit (as you said you were) and it was within a reasonable margin of error. Our police around here are CRAZY about dui's and are well known to pretty much pull over any car on the road after a certain time of night. I counted 8 pulled over in a 15 minute drive once and have been pulled over twice myself, but I had not been drinking either time. Lately, a number of those cases (a large enough number to make a big news story) have been thrown out in court because the police had no reason or right to pull the cars over in the first place (they weren't swerving or anything). Hopefully, your lawyer will be able to figure something out for you. If I were you, I would fork over the money for a really good attorney to improve your chances.
     
  6. teacherteacher4

    teacherteacher4 New Member

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    Jul 27, 2011

    I know it is unfortunate, especially I wasn't even pulled over for suspicion of a DUI. I know other teachers who have DUIs on their records but they happened well into their careers rather than at the beginning like mine. I'm hoping that once I get some experience under my belt that it wont be as big of an issue especially since by that point I will be off probation (if it gets that far). I understand that there are hundreds of applications for few jobs at this time but I am really hoping that this doesn't hurt my chances forever.
     
  7. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

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    I think the DUI could hurt your chances. If the school district knows of your arrest they will certainly weigh that in with the candidates that have a free and clear record. They have so many applicants that they can be picky. I know it was an error in judgement. But it could have a negative affect on your hiring situation in a state that is already having trouble placing teachers. I don't want to be a Debbie Downer. And I really hope that things work out.
     
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    You will have to have one heck of a resume.

    That said, there are so many applicants now that resumes get put on the bottom of the pile for things that might not have ten years ago.
     
  9. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 27, 2011

    The thing in your favor is that you already have a job for this year. So the resume thing may not be an issue-- make sure that you make yourself totally irreplaceable in this school.

    Make sure that when you leave, your recommendations are so glowing that the long-ago DUI pales next to the reports of your effectiveness.
     
  10. Caliguy104

    Caliguy104 New Member

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    Aug 20, 2013

    Hi, a similar situation just happened to me, except I am just starting a masters in education (no job yet). Were you able to get a job? Did the DUI have any other effects on your career?

    Thanks!
     
  11. teacherteacher4

    teacherteacher4 New Member

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    Aug 20, 2013

    I never did get a full-time teaching job and I was actually pink-slipped from the job I did have because of it. Since then I worked as a private tutor and a para-educator but never was given my own classroom. I have applied to over 200 jobs in California since the incident and I have only had 3 interviews (this could also be because of the job to applicant ratio). Hopefully the entire thing will be expunged on Monday (fingers crossed) and I can start again when applications for the 2014-2015 school year begin. I have also decided to try my luck out of state. I was just accepted to Master's degree programs in Oregon and Arizona so depending on where I go I will also submit applications there.

    My advice to you is to stay out of trouble and complete all of your court required classes/fines/etc. asap! Once all of that is done you only have to wait a year and a half before you can apply for early expungement. Hopefully this lines up well with you being in school and it will all be expunged and dealt with before you graduate.

    Good luck.
     
  12. eyeteach

    eyeteach Rookie

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    Aug 20, 2013

    I have two teacher friends who have gotten them and got convicted. One happened during the first year of teaching and the other happened before she was hired. This was about 4 years ago. Maybe the cop will not show up and it gets dropped. Maybe your lawyer can challenge the reading. Hope that you are able to get a job even if it means leaving the state.

    Also, in most places, a few years after your conviction, you can drive a bus.
     
  13. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 21, 2013

    A court will never dismiss a DUI/DWI case if the officer does not show up.

    They will schedule a special session, based around the officers schedules (or provide the chief of police with the date & time of the DWI/DUI session, so he can put the officers needed on duty then), if necessary to try the DUI/DWIs.

    For a last resort, they will have the officer submit written documentation or use their writeup of the arrest.

    They'll dismiss things like small speeding tickets if the officer doesn't show up, but never something big like a DUI/DWI.
     
  14. MathTeacher2015

    MathTeacher2015 Rookie

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    Aug 21, 2013

    I'm at a loss about my situation. Sounds like I should just give up pursuing teaching all together.

    I'm enrolled to start an MAT program this fall. My goal is to be a 6-12 math teacher beginning 2015-2016 school year.

    In 1993, being part of a production team and talent, I was involved in a educational 2 hour live call-in public access TV series that discussed HIV prevention/living. The last program created a legal incident and managed to land everyone involved with an obscenity misdemeanor which lead to a year probation, community service, and a fine.

    Being 2013, this will nearly be a 20 years ago incident. I believe the conviction will show up on my criminal history. That is the only blemish I have ever had.

    I'm really concerned about starting an MAT program that will cost me at least $50k that possibly won't matter if my résumé is going to the bottom of the barrel due to my 1993 conviction.

    I've been stressing out over the last couple of weeks about whether to pull out of the program or not.
     
  15. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Aug 21, 2013

    I recommend that you contact a lawyer.
     
  16. MathTeacher2015

    MathTeacher2015 Rookie

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    Aug 21, 2013

    Caesar753, can you enlighten me on how a lawyer could possibly help in this situation?

    I had representation back in 1993 courtesy of the ACLU. This particular conviction can not be expunged.

    That happened while I was completing my BA at 22. Now that I'm 43, I'm career switching, although teaching is what I have always wanted to do. I was hoping to get my Praxis 1 and 2 out of the way before student teaching starts fall 2014 but by then I would have at least amassed $28k in tuition costs if I continue the MAT route. Also, I wanted to be a more competitive 1st year teacher candidate by having completed a master's program.

    Thank you in advance for your feedback. MAT program courses start Sept. 2. What anguish!
     
  17. bros

    bros Phenom

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    Aug 22, 2013

    Have you tried consulting a lawyer recently to see if you can get the charge expunged? It would make no sense that it cannot be expunged, it is not a felony.
     
  18. MathTeacher2015

    MathTeacher2015 Rookie

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    Hello Bros,

    Yes, I've consulted with the original lawyer last year, and it is inexpungable. From my understanding, there is a statute of limitations to expunge but also due to the nature of the conviction, it does not qualify.

    Also, I've come across applications that ask you if you have any "expunged" charges. I don't think I'd ever be able to just sweep the incident under the rug.

    To put my mind at ease, I've opted to remove myself from the MAT program and continue to wrap up my BS in Mathematics with Teacher Certification. I think if I am unable to become a teacher, I will still have pursued my dream of finishing my math degree and use the effort to pursue another field of work.

    I'm passionate about math. So I'm doing this for me first. The desired result would be to be that agent of change to many frustrated and disillusioned students who are negatively challenged by math and give them a second chance to really appreciate it and how it opens doors to critical thinking, problem solving, basic life skills, and to prepare them for success in their further education. Math opens doors to everything!

    I don't regret what I did at 22 as people were dying, scared, homebound, and continuing to get infected, that the program indeed had its proper place at a time that no one wanted to talk about it, especially in Texas.
     
  19. bros

    bros Phenom

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    That is just bizarre that you cannot get it expunged. I know around here (NJ), you can typically get those things expunged.

    Although most people don't bother getting old convictions expunged. The court my mom works for recently got a call about a person who had a case against them in 1968 for trespassing or something when they were protesting against the Vietnam War.
     
  20. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    It seems like you're really jumping the gun here, honestly. Most of the time applications allow you to explain the circumstances around an arrest/conviction. I would imagine that if your circumstances match what you've said here, your application would still be considered just about everywhere. That's why I suggested consulting with a lawyer.
     
  21. Larla

    Larla New Member

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    Just because they ask you to list whether you have had anything expunged, you are legally allowed to say no if you had your dui expunged. The only people you are required to report your dui to are the lottery, if you're running for public office and the actual state licensing board where you get your original credentials.
    You don't have to list it to job applications. Definitely ask a lawyer about the details. People writing here don't know unless they've been through it themselves.
     
  22. Honest_Teacher

    Honest_Teacher Comrade

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    The teaching labor market is not as inundated with qualified applicants as many people on this board implicitly or explicitly claim, for what it's worth.
     
  23. kcjo13

    kcjo13 Phenom

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    Says who?
     
  24. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    I agree with the others - your application will likely be put to the side if there is any competition at all.

    I know you said you don't want a lecture, so feel free to skip on by. But I do want to address waterfall's statement - that "one little mistake" you reference could have caused a lot more damage than a ruined career. The OP better be thanking his lucky stars that it didn't ruin someone's ability to walk. Or breathe.
     
  25. Honest_Teacher

    Honest_Teacher Comrade

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    Apr 21, 2014

    "Teacher Supply: What’s New
    We now turn to a discussion of changes in the supply of teachers over the past two decades. Because the supply of teachers is a function of population demographics, salaries, opportunity costs, and working conditions, we examine how trends in each of these factors have affected teacher supply.

    Demographics. The teacher workforce in the United States has aged steadily since the mid-1970s and is on the verge of a large wave of retirements. In 2005, 42 percent of teachers were aged fifty or older, compared with 25 percent in 1996. The distribution of teacher experience shows the same trend. In 2001, 38 percent of U.S. teachers had more than twenty years of experience—up from 28 percent in 1986 and 18 percent in 1971.62 The implication is that more teachers will be needed to replace the many who will retire soon.

    In the past, two sources of supply have been important in responding to increased demand for teachers. One is the share of college students who train to become teachers, which has grown. The second is the reserve pool—licensed teachers who return to teaching after a period spent in another activity. Undoubtedly, both sources of supply will be important in responding to the increase in demand for teachers in the years ahead. But, as we show, several labor market developments have made it much harder for today’s schools to attract talented college graduates.

    Salaries and Opportunity Costs. The supply of teachers in the labor market has been adversely affected by increasing labor market opportunities for women and minorities. Before the civil rights and women’s movements, opportunities for women and people of color were severely constrained by discrimination. As a result, among the available alternatives, teaching was a relatively high-status occupation for both women and people of color—a situation that helped guarantee a steady flow of academically talented women and minorities into the teaching profession. Changes in the occupational choices of black college graduates illustrate this trend. In the late 1960s, six out of every ten black college graduates entered teaching within five years of graduation; by the early 1980s, that figure was one in ten.63

    As labor market opportunities for women and minorities have expanded, their opportunity costs have risen—and have risen most sharply for those with stronger academic abilities. Research by Sean Corcoran, William Evans, and Robert Schwab shows that from 1964 to 2000 the average ability level of entering female teachers declined only slightly, but the share of young female teachers from the top decile of their high school class fell from 20 percent to 11 percent.64 Figure 4, which is excerpted from their work, illustrates these trends.

    In summary, improved labor market opportunities for women and minorities have forced education to compete increasingly with other occupations for talented college graduates. And as figure 4 indicates, education is losing this competition. Part of the explanation is that other occupations reward strong academic skills more than education does.65 Using data from the National Center for Education Statistics’ 1993–2003 Baccalaureate and Beyond Longitudinal Survey, Dan Goldhaber and Albert Liu found that unlike teaching salaries, nonteaching salaries for recent female college graduates rewarded college selectivity, technical majors, and high GPAs."

    http://futureofchildren.org/publica...x.xml?journalid=34&articleid=74&sectionid=428

    Less competition in traditional teaching demographics = more jobs.
     

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