Dropping IQ?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by teacherintexas, May 31, 2013.

  1. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I had to pick up my jaw off of the floor during an ARD recently. A student was recently tested and we had his initial ARD. The diagnostician shared his IQ and said it was in the average range.

    It was a 75.

    After the meeting, I questioned her and she said they are nationally normed and that now 75 does fall within the average range.

    How does this happen????
     
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  3. bros

    bros Phenom

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    75 is not considered average by any definition of the term when considering IQ

    Average is one standard deviation from the norm, aka +/- 15 points

    75 would be considered borderline.

    Is English the student's native language?

    Was the IQ a verbal IQ test or a nonverbal IQ test? Might the district be willing to do a nonverbal IQ test to see if the student performs better (and therefore would indicate an issue with verbal activities)
     
  4. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    75 is totally not a normal IQ. That is bare minimum for anyone who is not mentally challenged.
     
  5. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Maybe so less kids will get identified? I know they lowered our speech requirements so now it's harder qualify for it (but I think that might be a district cutoff).
     
  6. Mr.history

    Mr.history Cohort

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    That is actually very sad. How much do they really save by having less kids in speech class?
     
  7. a2z

    a2z Virtuoso

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    I have heard some try to lump the "low-average" into the average category because it has the word average in it. I see this more when it comes to the achievement portion of testing when services want to be denied.

    I have never heard of 75 being within the real average range.
     
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    He did qualify for services.

    If this is considered average, our country is going somewhere in a hand basket.

    And to answer Bros, English is his only language.

    Maybe we need a new diag.
     
  9. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    It's technically "low average," and does fall above the 70 cutoff for EH/MR so informally it may be called "average" to refer to the fact that it's not below 70.

    Others have mentioned some reasons why IQ might have changed, but to chime in: IQ is stable after age 6 or so, so unless there is some sort of TBI or illness affecting the brain (e.g., chemo related to cancer) there shouldn't be too much of a shift. Measurement error is also a possibility, and as bros said the form of IQ test (e.g., if the child struggles in verbal intelligence areas then moving from a nonverbal to verbal/nonverbal IQ would obviously cause it to drop, but that's not IQ dropping - just measuring something different).

    In terms of qualification, what did the student qualify for?
     
  10. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    If a student who is say in 4th grade has an IQ of only 75, that means mentally they are at the academic abilities of about a first grader. Which means they could possibly have many difficulties with math, logic, reading comprehension, but can possibly be just as good with arts and encore subjects. They will likely require a lot of intervention and extra help. I'd be willing to bet money on anyone with a confirmed IQ score of less than 85 in a public school will be held back at least one grade. That's just my opinion though.
     
  11. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    I agree with EdEd.
     
  12. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Huh? Held back for a low IQ? If they're IQ is so low that they can't properly function in their grade level than they should be getting special ed services, not get held back.
     
  13. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    A child with a low IQ may struggle with academics, but intelligence is (at least theoretically) detached from achievement as a construct. So, it wouldn't be accurate necessarily to say that a 4th grader with an IQ of 75 would be performing similarly to a first grader on academic tasks. That may be true, but not necessarily.
     
  14. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    I don't think the comment mean the child would be held back because of IQ, but rather that - because IQ is so low - academic achievement would likely be on the lower end, leading to a greater likelihood of retention.
     
  15. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I understand that. But hopefully a child who's IQ is that low would be evaluated for special ed before simply being held back.
     
  16. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

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    Definitely would be good for such a child to receive more intensive services instead of retention.
     
  17. catlover

    catlover Rookie

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    I don't think anything has changed; the terminology is just confusing.

    Intellectual disability (what was previously called mental retardation) was historically defined as more than TWO standard deviations below the median. Similarly, gifted is more than two above.

    So it is possible to refer to the rather large range that is above intellectual disability but below gifted as "average."

    The one SD version of "average" is 85 to 115. The SD below that would then be "low average" and would go down to 71 or 70. If a child has an IQ of 75, they might well receive special services but probably not under the eligibility category of mental retardation.
     
  18. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    The diagnostician never referred to 75 as low average, even when I questioned her after the meeting. That's what left me nonplussed. I couldn't believe she let that parent believe her child had an average IQ.

    I still think we need a new diag.
     
  19. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

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    I am so not familiar with IQ testing. I've taken online ones for personal edification purposes and had a varied range. Maybe he should be retested because he is borderline?
     
  20. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    He qualified for services so there is no need for retesting.
     
  21. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    I didn't mean held back for low IQ, but held back if they are not at the capacity for grasping the concepts normal for their age. An IQ of 75 in grade school is definitely not a good thing.
     
  22. bros

    bros Phenom

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    There is a marked difference between online IQ tests and actual IQ tests.

    Typically the online tests are significantly inflated.
     
  23. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    The online ones measure certain right and wrong questions as well as some other logical ones to test your scope of thinking based on your age.

    A valid IQ score can only be determined when examined and scored by a professional.
     

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