drawing coordinate grids on no-tech white board

Discussion in 'General Education' started by WaterfallLady, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    I work in a REALLY small K-12 school. I teach THE ONLY high school math class. It's only one period of my day. It's in another teacher's classroom.

    Here is the problem. We've been doing lots of graphing with coordinate grids. I have no way to make a good coordinate grid on the board. I can't access an overhead or any other technology.

    Does anyone have any low tech solutions for this?
     
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  3. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I'm very low tech myself.

    I just use a straightedge-- a yard stick.
     
  4. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Have a large grid printed out on a peice of clear plastic that you can tape or otherwise attatch to the whiteboard.

    Other than that, just draw it out. My students have never had a problem with my horrible drawing :D
     
  5. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    The problem is that I have a class right before that, I don't have time to come in and draw on the board with a yard stick. Plus, I don't even have a yard stick! Then, I'd spend all that time drawing the grid, and I'd have to erase it after one set of problems. What a shame! My whiteboard is small so I can only draw one at a time. The kids I have are pretty low level, so they need the guidance of seeing every possible grid line, instead of just the x and the y axis.

    I do like your idea and I've basically been doing that with only the x and y axis, its just not efficient :(
     
  6. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Cool idea. Where do you think I could get it printed at?

    My drawing confuses the poor kids. :)
     
  7. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    I think someplace like office depot or office max would be able to do it. If you have a budget, I know my old school ordered them from someplace...not sure where...they just magically showed up.
     
  8. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    When you say low tech, do you mean you have no access at all. It is possible to put your grid on acetate and project it onto any board or surface using an overhead. If only you had an overhead, that would be something.
     
  9. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Could you buy a large-ish (4 foot by 4 foot) whiteboard and draw the grid on it with permanent marker, then use whiteboard marker to teach? The whiteboard could be placed on the chalk tray while teaching, and kept snug against a wall out of the way when not in use.
     
  10. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    I have an overhead but not in my room. Its hard to transport it from one room to another because of the way our school is set up spatially. I've borrowed it a few times but I'd prefer to have some sort of permanent solution.
     
  11. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Looks like my best option so far.
     
  12. Securis

    Securis Cohort

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    I do know that white board markers will remove permanent marker if you mark over the lines so you may have to spend time repairing your grid every so often.
     
  13. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Or even get a piece of showerboard or tileboard, which would be a lot cheaper. It's around $10 for a piece that runs about 3 by 4 feet. I haven't used it myself, but there's a lot written about it on here and other places on the web.
     
  14. ku_alum

    ku_alum Aficionado

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    Ooo, even better Mrs. K!
     
  15. TeacherShelly

    TeacherShelly Aficionado

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    Then you could use small squares of electrical tape, or office dot stickers as the dots. That way you don't have to worry about marking over them. Make them the same color as your white board marker.
     
  16. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    I was in almost the same position as you. One class a day of algebra and otherwise taught 5th. Small school. Everything out of my pocket.

    Did anyone say this yet? For a whole-class coordinate grid, you can buy the huge Post-It tablets with a graph (just vertical and horizontal lines, no axis). Hang on the board with magnets or whatever you use.

    For individual ones, just make one in microsoft word or download one from a graphs site (I don't have the address handy), mount on cardboard, insert into sheet protectors. Voila. Instant individual coordinate grids.
     
  17. fuzed_fizzion

    fuzed_fizzion Comrade

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    I have purchased the large chart pak graph paper from office depot or staples, then laminated a bunch of blank sheets. I tape them up and write on them with expo markers. I also have a pak of unscented baby wipes that takes all of the ink right off. This way I can draw on them or have students do work on them. If I have to stop in the middle of a problem I just roll it up and take it with me, then I have all of it for the next day without having to rewrite anything.
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2010
  18. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Staples carries, or used to carry, easel pads of self-adhesive write-on wipe-off sheets. You could pre-mark a couple of them and use them in rotation (and, once the sticky stuff gives out, follow some previous poster's suggestion and keep 'em in place with magnets).
     
  19. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I don't draw the whole grid; I draw the x and y axes.
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Not everyone has such a good eye, though, Alice.

    Though, golly, here's a thought: what about laminating one strip for the x axis and another strip for the y axis, perhaps attaching one to the other with a brad or something, and hanging the result from the top of the whiteboard?
     
  21. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    Make a small version by printing one from the internet.
    Take to staples, they will enlarge it to poster size for around $3.
    Laminate. Then you can use expo marker on it and it will erase. Just be sure to clean it often.
     
  22. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    Great idea, but my kids still need the guidance of all the grid lines in addition to the axis.
     
  23. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    I love my school. But yes, I am almost in the same position. My school will pay for things, I just have to ask and make sure I REALLY need it.
     
  24. Tealsmith

    Tealsmith Rookie

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    Here's an idea. Go to Home Depot and buy a piece of Melamine. It is particle board with a white plastic covering that is used for bathroom cabinets and such. Then buy a piece of pegboard with evenly spaced holes in it. Put the pegboard over the Melamine and spray paint it to make evenly spaced permanent dots on it. Cut the Melamine to a mangable size and hang it on the wall.
     
  25. Miss.H

    Miss.H Rookie

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    Can you alternate between a drawn grid and a large laminated piece of white card/paper with lines on. Then you can just use whiteboard markers and rub it off when you are finished.

    If it is time consuming to draw the grid. Get a student to prepare one grid while you are using the other. It will save you having to draw and lines and will give you more time to focus on other things.

    OR

    get some huge pieces of butcher paper and get some students or teaching assistant to draw up some grid lines and just use a different piece of paper each time. At least this way you keep a copy of each graph you do to refer back to later.


    OR

    You could also drawn grid lines on your board with a 'liquid chalk' pen. The lines stay there semi-permanently, so you can rub the chalk off and keep the grid lines on the board. When you are finished with the grid lines you just use a solution to remove the 'liquid chalk' pen lines.
     
  26. Miss.H

    Miss.H Rookie

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    I forgot to mention that 'liquid chalk' pens write on any non-porous surface. blackboard, whiteboard, windows, glass, laminate...so it gives you a few options.
     
  27. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    That sounds like the solution!
     
  28. MathTeacher29

    MathTeacher29 Rookie

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  29. WaterfallLady

    WaterfallLady Enthusiast

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    That is even a lot better. :) I think I can persuade my principal.

    The ideas keep getting better so I can't wait to see whats next.
     
  30. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Okay, that's nifty!
     
  31. BioAngel

    BioAngel Science Teacher - Grades 3-6

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    I use large poster paper that has graph lines on it when I have to do graphing with my kids. I like that I can actually save the paper and hang it up around the classroom--- then on another day I can go back to it with the kids.
     
  32. wrice

    wrice Habitué

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    I'd go to a quality art supply store and buy drafting tape- an opaque and easily removed tape that comes in different colors and widths, and string up an axis grid with that.

    Sharpie does come off with alcohol and a bit of elbow grease. Try it in the corner first, but you could do the grid in light Sharpie and the rest in dry erase. Or get one of those shower board sheets mentioned earlier from Home Depot and make it your permanent grid display with Sharpie.

    If you have access to an old fashioned chalkboard, you can wet a towel and moisten the board with it, then draw the grid in chalk over the wet board. That chalk will stick better than chalk drawn when the board is dry. Kids wonder when you erase why some chalk stays and you just smile a knowing smile...
     
  33. tgim

    tgim Habitué

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    Get one of those musical staff line/drawing tools for the white board...I have one for my chalkboard and use it to make 4-5 lines at a time, all parallel horizontally, then do the same vertically.

    You could also draw one on a piece of poster board and laminate it, then just put it up when you need it.
     
  34. FCLaura

    FCLaura Rookie

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    What I have done to keep writing on the white board that I don't want erased is to draw on the white board with a Vis-a-Vis (wet erase) pen that would normally be used for an overhead. You could draw a coordinate grid once, and then write on it with dry erase marker. You can erase over the vis-a-vis without it coming off. I have done this for the schedule in my elementary room. You'd have to clear it with the other teacher, but hopefully they would understand. Good Luck!
     
  35. Missy99

    Missy99 Connoisseur

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    Is it a blackboard or a white board? Don't they still sell those gadgets you can put four pieces of chalk or four markers in that will draw four straight lines at a time? You could draw a grid in a snap!
     
  36. tgim

    tgim Habitué

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    That's what I was thinking of - Missy99 - thanks for making it clearer.
     

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