Dr Laura quits

Discussion in 'Teacher Time Out' started by Irishdave, Aug 17, 2010.

  1. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Aug 17, 2010

    Dr Laura Announced that she would not renew her radio contract
    It is because she used the N word trying to make a philosophical point
    It is sad that this can happen. I really liked her to the point statements about parenting
     
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  3. Starista

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    Wow... While I have disagreement with a LOT of her beliefs her book "10 Stupid Things Women Do To Mess Up Their Lives" helped change the way I view my career, men, and most importantly myself when I was in my early 20s.

    I recommend that book to ANY woman who believes that she needs a boyfriend/husband to validate herself. It's a great self-esteem builder.
     
  4. Unbeknownst

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    I'll be the first to say that I am most adamantly against the N word.

    But what I am more against is that someone can lose their career, no matter how long they've worked there (10, 20, 30 years ...) for saying a word.

    Dr. Laura is a pretty neat woman. I hope she finds a suitable alternative career to be as helpful as she is now to so many women.
     
  5. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Aug 18, 2010

    She says she just wants to step away from radio...she says that she is tired of being monitored all the time. She is going to continue her books and she has started blogs and websites.
     
  6. Cerek

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    After looking up the dialogue that created the controversy, I have to agree with Dr. Laura and the point she was trying to make.

    When the caller complained about racial insults from her husband's friends, Dr. Laura pointed out that black comedians on HBO use the N-word constantly (only Dr. Laura actually enunciated the word used).

    The caller then said she couldn't believe Dr. Laura was "on the radio spewing out" the N-word.

    Uhm...no....Dr. Laura wasn't "spewing" the word, she was repeating the word that black comedians "spew" in their stand-up routines on a regular basis, which emphasized the point she was making that the word is only considered horrible if it is said by a non-black.
     
  7. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2010

    There is a big difference in calling someone a curse word or saying it AT them, and saying the word because you are talking about the word or a situation in which it was said.

    A good friend of mine, who is probably one of the most accepting, least racist people I know, was talking with some people about generational differences, and she was commenting that in Argentina, the n-word (she said it outright) doesn't have as much meaning and that many people use it in a non-derogatory was to refer to a black person all the time. Another woman jumped all on her case about saying the word,even though they were discussing the WORD, not a person or group of people associated with it.

    I think not even discussing the word just gives it more negative power.
     
  8. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2010

    I will add, too, that this becomes a huge issue with my students when we are reading literature that has the word in it. I say it because I don't censor literature. But many of the students think that if a white person says the word while reading they must be racist. I have even had students say "OH, it's coming up. Only so and so (insert black student's name here) can read this part." I try to tell them to stop empowering the word.

    But again, I am not African American, and I don't know how much that word stings every time someone says it.
     
  9. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2010

    If only Rush Limbaugh, Don Imus, and 90% of the others would follow her on the way out. Her delivery was completely offensive and if she were Black, my opinion would still be the same. She was unprofessional, rude, and dismissive regardless of her race.

    Not all black people support or use the word. You can't stereotype an entire race of people just because rappers and HBO comedians use the word. So rappers and HBO comedians speak for the entire Black race? That shows her shallowness if she believes that.

    The N-word also refers to a person of any race who is less than, ignorant, rude, etc. So if the word is so powerless, does she support someone calling her or her family members the N-word? After all, HBO comedians say it, so she shouldn't have a problem being referred to as the N-word, right?

    Furthermore, when Blacks use the word the context and pronunciation is different. Other ethnic groups and groups period, or even family members or people with unique relationships with each others use traditionally offensive words to refer to each other.

    Many women refer to each other using the B-word, H-word, W-word and yes use it as a non offensive slang term.
    But that doesn't mean if you are not a part of "their group" that you can come in as an outsider and use the word. Social Psychology 101, Dr. Laura.

    Secondly, when whites have used the word, the word was uttered to Blacks before they were spat on, gang raped, set on fire, beaten, hanged from trees, cut open, buried alive, killed and tortured by angry white mobs...and that is why Black people take huge offense to outsiders (whites) using the word. It's due to the historical context. It's amazing that anyone has to even explain this.

    Does she care to know her Black history, or does she let the HBO comedians educate her on Black history and culture?
     
  10. Ms. I

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    Aug 18, 2010

    It started when a black female caller who was married to a white man said that he called her the n word...perhaps when they argued or maybe he just called her that to bellittle her. And what's Dr. Laura's advice w/ all her supposed "words of wisdom"? :

    "If you didn't want to be called a n-----, you shouldn't have married him."
    In total, Dr. Laura said the word 11 times! :eek:

    Oh yes, that's fabulous advice! She needs to be off the air. That's what happens when you say/do something inappropriate. I notice throughout the yrs, she doesn't like talking to black callers anyway. She's more abrupt & short w/ them. She doesn't really want to help them. :rolleyes:

    People can't treat people any kind of way, no matter how subtle they think they're being & continue to have success. It will catch up to them someday. People can call it God's doing, karma, whatever they want to call it.
     
  11. VANewbie

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Wow.SMH-I will step away from this thread now.
     
  12. OedipaMaas

    OedipaMaas Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Dr. Laura is a hateful, bigoted person not fit to dole out advice. Thank goodness she is finally off the air.
     
  13. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Well I will say that Dr Laura has always commented frankly.
    in this case she pointed out that her situation does have extra stress.
    That is real life, I wish that it was not so. A marriage is a journey not a destination.
    Her biggest point is choosing the best mate you can. Do not overlook the dips in the road. If you marry outside your faith, race, your Political Persuasion, your body type, etc. they all carry their own unique environment. if you are not ready to take them on don't start.
    Does your boy friend have a habit that you are will to live with, will you want to live with it for 40 years?

    When it comes to ways of the heart or lust, we tend to think in the moment, people don't realize there is more than to marriage then the wedding.

     
  14. MissJill

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Good
     
  15. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2010

    As an African-American woman, age 27, I am sad to hear that Dr. Laura is off the air. Personally I feel that she did nothing wrong. She was not calling anyone the word simply just saying it. I'm tired of people thinking they are the word police. We as black people do not own that word and I'm tired of people thinking that we do. It just a shame that people has exploited this situation to air other grievances they have against Dr. Laura.

    Mrs. I/Ms. I. I think you may have been listening to a different conversation because that quote did not come out of Dr. Laura's mouth!

    I just wish I could meet her so I could tell her to tell her "haters" to buzz off and to keep up the good work!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    PS. Ans since when do people have to have the right to say a word. I can't think of a word that only white people say that others can't or that asians can say that other can't. Let's think about that.
     
  16. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    Really? Please explain a time where she was both hateful and or bigoted!
     
  17. Special-t

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    Aug 18, 2010

    How could she have felt comfortable enough to repeat that word over and over again? I realize she was making a point, but personally, I feel so uncomfortable saying that word that I could never utter it repeatedly to make any point. The fact that she felt so comfortable saying that word - repeatedly - is shocking.

    If white people think they have permission to use that word, just because some blacks use it, they are just looking for an excuse to say it. Why would anyone say that word just because someone else uses it????????????? It's the most immature argument in the books ... "He did it, so why can't I?" ... Don't we tell our kids that's not an acceptable reason to do something wrong?
     
  18. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Many people who dislike her are tolerant of "people who have a baby out of wedlock" but are not tolerant of her. It doesn't make sense to me. she will point out that a person's past choices are what put them in the position they are in today.

    "If your husband took off and doesn't pay child support remember you chose him" is the type of Dr Lauraisums she will say.
    "Do the right thing"
    "Your kids are in Daycare ... in other words someone else is 'parenting' them"

    Sometimes she will say things that will make people feel guilty and since in this "me generation" we are not to have guilt in our lives <sarcasm>.
    Can I say that I have never felt guilty while listing to her show? no.
    Many times I have said "heck that's me" and I was made to look at myself, and I hated it She was right but not Politically Correct.

    I wonder how many have really read her books or listen to her
    I remember one time she got on a Gay man ... not because he was gay but because he was not acting correctly in the relationship with his Significant Other.
    recently we had a discussion about "just close the door and teach it your way" BUT what was the "Do the right thing" in that debate?
     
  19. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    Why do you have to have permission to use it, and from who do you gain permission?

    As a black person who gave me permission to use it?

    And again I'm looking for someone to please explain the argument that she can't even say the word. Please ANYONE?
     
  20. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    I agree with everything in this post. My mother had me listen to Dr. Laura since I was in my preteens lol. (I am currently 27)
     
  21. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    You should not use your comfort level to judge someone else comfort level. That is like me saying how could she breast feed on public transportation, i know her child has to eat but, I feel so uncomfortable breastfeeding period, its shocking that she would breastfeed in public. -------See how ridiculous that sounds.
     
  22. webmistress

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    It's not about someone technically giving anyone permission to do anything. She's an adult and can do or say what she wants.

    However, she has to be aware of the historical and cultural context of whatever she is doing, and she needs to be able to handle and expect the consequences that result from engaging in behavior that is controversial and using a word that has one of the most offensive, harmful, and degrading stories behind it.

    If I go to another country, there are certain things that are perfectly acceptable in America, however, we all certainly know that we need to follow the standards or rules as to respect whatever group of people we are around.

    I know 'deaf' people who are highly offended if we call them deaf, so I won't do it. Out of respect for another human being, I call her hearing impaired, though other deaf people are fine with the other terminology.

    It's the same thing with mixed-raced people, people with disabilities, and people of other racial ethnicities. I don't care if I think nothing is wrong with the word, if I know it offend millions of people then something must be wrong somewhere, and I watch my language in their presence.

    From my other post, historically speaking, actually just as little as 40 years ago,
    "When whites have used the word, the word was uttered to Blacks before they were spat on, gang raped, set on fire, beaten, hanged from trees, cut open, buried alive, killed and tortured by angry white mobs...and that is why Black people take huge offense to outsiders (whites or non Blacks) using the word. It's due to the historical context. It's amazing that anyone has to even explain this."

    I also said in my other posts that lots of women use the B-word as a compliment, and term of endearment among each other. But if you are not a part of their specific group, you would certainly offend them by calling them that word.

    ETA:
    And I know many kids whose parents call them "Ugly, black, nappy headed, dumb, and crazy." Or on the opposite end...red n-ck, or poor white t---h.

    Does that give me a right to call the children such a thing, even if that's what their parents call them?
     
  23. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    Most Blacks I know would not have taken offense to how Dr. Laura used the word.
    Yes! Historically the word did have a different meaning and evoked different feeling but today it does not. And I am speaking from an African-American background. I feel that Dr. Laura did nothing wrong and I'm sad to see her go off the air.
     
  24. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2010

     
  25. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Yes I have seen how the word has changed
    My maternal Grandmother (b.1900) would use the n-word but it was not in a hateful way but my dad (b.1905) he used it hatefully.
    My grandmother once saved me from a couple white boys who caught me drinking out of a "colored" water fountain.
    I have seen the terms go from the n-word, to Negro, to colored, to Black and now African-American.
    Much as the words Wop, Dago, Honky Mick, Polock, & Chink, the N-word has been with us a long time. I wish that no one would use any of them but this is real life, I don't know how many times people assume that because I am Irish I get drunk (drunken Irishman). Should I take offense or let it roll off my back like water off a duck?
    Dr Laura is not the first and she will not be the last
     
  26. Cerek

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    She did handle the consequences and, IMO, did so in a professional manner. She had already issued an apology before the story was picked up by the mainstream media. By the time anyone but her regular listeners found out about the dialogue, Dr. Laura had already admitted she should have tried a different approach to make her point and had apologized to the caller.

    And this is part of the point Dr. Laura was attempting to make; that many members of the group in question use the word themselves, even though the word is supposed to be extremely offensive. You asked earlier if rappers and comedians speak for all Black people. Maybe not "all" blacks, but the fact that these rappers and comedians remain very successful while using the word obviously means other blacks are not offended by their use of it. If the word is so hatefully offensive, it should be stricken from the language completely, not just for certain groups. If the target group takes measures to KEEP the word in circulation and use, then they are sending a mixed message.

    I believe this is the type of hypersensitivity Dr. Laura was talking about. I'm sorry if your friend finds the term "deaf" offensive, but if (s)he cannot hear, then - by definition - (s)he is deaf. That is not being hateful or derogatory, that is just stating a fact.

    Hearing impaired is not necessarily the same thing, since it can be applied to those who are hard of hearing rather than completely deaf.

    Now, I understand you use the term to avoid upsetting your friend and I respect that, but if I don't know the term offends a particular individual, I'm not going to feel guilty or insensitive for describing their condition in a factual manner. As you said yourself, many deaf people are NOT offended by the word and their is no "historical context" to blame for putting the correct use of the word in a negative light.

    Please provide examples of Blacks being gang raped, set on fire, hanged from trees, cut open, buried alive or tortured by angry white mobs as little as 40 years ago.

    There were some whites who still spat on Blacks at that time and there might even have been rare examples of a black being beaten and killed by a group of whites, but the rest is hyperbole rather than fact.

    And, again, I counter that - if the word IS so offensive to the group - they should eliminate it's usage completely.

    Your argument is that there is no question a word should not be used if it is so universally offensive and, IF the offensiveness of the word truly was universal, I would agree. Now, I understand the N-word is far more emotionally charged than the other examples you used, but the problem is that you are saying we should not use ANY words that might offend someone at sometime, even though that same word does NOT offend those same people other times. No, I don't agree.

    Frankly, we do not have any "right" to NOT be offended. That is not found anywhere in the Constitution. However, we DO have a Right to Free Speech, and this right was considered so important to our Founding Fathers that they listed it first among all the amendments to the Constitution.
     
  27. JustMe

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    Aug 18, 2010

    I've never heard of Dr. Laura, but I'll be looking into this after supper and responding.
     
  28. JustMe

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    Okay, so I listened to the full audio recording. I don't know this woman; I've never so much as heard of her. Maybe I shouldn't admit that, but it's true. So, here is my opinion:

    She's not the most polite person.

    It seemed that each time she said "black" it was a heavy word. This is what the word "black" looks like when she says it: We have a BLACK! president.

    She most certainly didn't call anyone the N word.

    I feel that while it's a valid item of discussion, it wasn't discussed in a manner which would likely prove helpful.

    I certainly don't think she should feel the need to leave her show because of this.
     
  29. McKennaL

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Uh... needing permission to say a word? Are we going to start burning books we don't like too?

    I used to listen to her all the time, until she went off in our area...and have missed her ever since. She was brutally honest...as am I. I was always glad to hear her opinion...and I will tell you, her thoughts and comments have helped me in MY life, and also helped me in counseling others.

    Ex: Think of yourself in 5 years from now. When you look back on this issue and how you are thinking of handling it - do you agree that this was a good choice? If your child was your age, and asking you advice of how to handle this problem in THEIR life...is this what you would counsel them to do?

    ****

    I heard the call....and I think it was phoney. A phoney issue spoken by a person with an agenda and a mission to race bait.

    Pure and Simple.
     
  30. webmistress

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    Cerek I will respond to the rest of your post later, but I have to start here. The fact that I have to explain these things shows for sure that Blacks in the past and Blacks in the present are completely dismissed and ignored, that is, unless it's the HBO comedians and rappers.


    1st, it doesn't matter if it happened 1,000 years ago. The time period was not my point.
    The fact is, it happened, every day, for HUNDREDS of years period. And the ignorance and hatred of the perpetrators were passed down to their future generations. So the hatred is still here. The difference is that there are LAWS now that help keep the racists in line. Or at least the laws used to.

    Furthermore, do you dismiss the Holocaust, the World Wars or any other crimes against mankind because it happened a certain amount of years ago?

    But to answer your question:

    1998
    James Byrd, Jr. (May 2, 1949 – June 7, 1998) was an African-American who was murdered by three white men in Jasper, Texas, on June 7, 1998. Shawn Allen Berry, Lawrence Russell Brewer, and John William King dragged Byrd behind a pick-up truck along a macadam pavement after they wrapped a heavy logging chain around his ankles.


    Byrd, who remained conscious throughout most the ordeal, was killed when his body hit the edge of a culvert severing his right arm and head. The murderers drove on for another mile before dumping his torso in front of the Jasper's black cemetery.

    ---------

    Instead of taking him home, the three men took to a remote county road out of town, beating him with anything they could find, urinated on his unconscious body, chained him by the ankles to their pickup truck, and dragged him for three miles. Brewer later claimed that Byrd's throat had been slashed by King before he was dragged.

    However, forensic evidence suggests that Byrd had been attempting to keep his head up while being dragged, and an autopsy suggested that Byrd was alive during much of the dragging. Byrd died after his right arm and head were severed after his body hit a culvert. His body had caught the culvert on the side of the road, resulting in Byrd's decapitation.

    State law enforcement officials, along with Jasper's District Attorney, determined that since Brewer and King were well-known white supremacists, the murder was a hate crime."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_James_Byrd,_Jr.
    ------------------------------------------------

    1981: Michael Donald

    Henry Francis Hays, 42, received a death sentence for the lynching-style murder of Michael Donald, a 19-year-old who was beaten, slashed and strangled with a rope after he was abducted at random from a street in Mobile. His body was strung up in a tree by the curb.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Donald

    ------------------------------------------------------

    2009: 7 East Bay teens arrested - hate crime alleged

    One minute he was hanging out with seven seemingly friendly guys in a park, the next he said he was on the ground, the blows coming from all sides, a fist or foot landing hard enough to fracture six bones in his face.

    But it was the words accompanying the blows that made Manning, 24, think he was about to die.

    "Coon." And then, "How do you like this, you f-ing n----r?"

    http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/artic...3R15LAQK.DTL&hw=Brandon+Manning&sn=002&sc=377

    ------------------------------------------
    Trust there are many many more cases. And many happened just ONE generation ago.

    This boy would be 70 years old today. I'm sure we all have relatives that are older than 70.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Murder_of_Emmett_Till
     
  31. Cerek

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    Aug 18, 2010

    She did emphasize BLACK President, because she was saying she thought racism would become less of an issue when we elected President that was black. Instead, allegations of racism have increased.

    She did not emphasize the word "black" in most of the rest of her comments, except when she was making the point that BLACK comedians on HBO seem to use the N-word all the time in their routines and other Blacks think it is funny then.

    Having read the transcript and, now, listened to the audio, I agree completely with the point Dr. Laura was making, even though she admits she went about it the wrong way.
     
  32. webmistress

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    How can you tell a group, a group that you are not a part of, what they should do in regards to what they have suffered at the hands of another group?

    Do you actually know how many Black people have eliminated the term from their vocabulary? Have you taken a survey? And please tell me how anyone can force the rappers and comedians or whomever else to stop using the word.

    A race as a group does not function like a pack of migrating birds. Just because one or one million do something, doesn't mean the rest will automatically follow.

    What do you mean by truly universal? 100 people? 1 million? 1 billion? There is absolutely nothing in the world that is truly universal when it comes to society.

    Even family members and countries go to war against each other.
    There will never be 100% consensus among 100% of the members in groups.


    Actually you can use any word you want at any given time.

    I'm speaking for myself, as a person who is very respectful, empathetic, and compassionate of other people's unfortunate struggles and experiences that I might not be able to relate to.

    Ever thought about walking in someone else's shoes? Maybe then you could see their viewpoint just a little.

    Constitution, Founding Fathers, yes they 'found' a lot of things including the Native Americans and Africans who the Constitution did not even apply to when it was written. If those rights were so important and the FF were so noble, they would have made sure all groups of people were included. Instead, people had to sacrifice their lives over a period of HUNDREDS of years to get the Constitution to apply to their group.
     
  33. JustMe

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    I agree this is an example of the hypersensitivity Dr. Laura was referencing.
     
  34. Cerek

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    Aug 18, 2010

    No. It shows that, when you use examples of extreme hyperbole, you will be called on to back them up. I did not dismiss the plight of Blacks and conceded that there were cases of Blacks being beaten and/or killed by whites within the past 40 years.

    What I dismissed, or rather contested, was the allegations of Blacks being set on fire, cut open and buried alive as recently as 40 years ago.

    Then you should have stated it that way, rather than claiming each of these atrocities happened within the last half-century

    Really? These events you described happened every single day for hundreds of years?

    While it IS true slaves were beaten, whipped and sometimes even maimed by their owners, it is also true they were a vital part of the owner's livelihood, so it would be counter-productive to buy a slave, then whip or beat them so badly they weren't able to do the work the owner needed done.

    I'm not dismissing that it happened, just pointing out that owners bought slaves to provide much-needed labor on their farms, not to just beat, whip and torture for mindless amusement.

    As for owners passing down this hatred to their future generations, I absolutely disagree with that. But if it IS the case, then I suppose that explains whey rappers and Black comedians still use the N-word, since some Free Blacks were also slave owners. There were Native American slaveowners as well, so I guess the hatred has been passed down to their future generations also (oh, there were also white slaves. admittedly a very small percentage, but not all slaves were Black).

    You're the one that established the time period, not I, so don't be upset that you were taken to task on it. Although your response once again illustrates the point Dr. Laura was making.

    Since I disputed your allegations, you've now made baseless accusations against me in a frustrated attempt to depict me as a racist or bigot (or both). I never denied slavery existed. I never denied many slaves were mistreated, beaten, whipped or tortured. I did not deny Blacks had been beaten and/or killed by whites during the time frame you mentioned.

    What I DID do was challenge your assertions that the more heinous events (ie hyperbole examples) you mentioned occurred in this time frame and that they occurred with the regularity you claimed.

    Once again, I never denied things like this had happened.
     
  35. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2010

    The 'deaf' reference was just an example to show that if you are not a part of a certain group, you may have no idea what offends them. Hypersensitivity or not, I respect the people whose presence I am in.
     
  36. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2010

    I invite you to re-read my post #41, which was a summary of a portion from my post #8. Notice the quotations in post #41.

    And everything I mentioned in the so-called hyperbole, I provided a factual example of and clearly backed up what I said. There are many more examples. You can stay stuck on 40 years if you like, but by doing that, I am sorry to say that you are missing the main idea and not able to see the forest for the trees.

    As the author of my own posts I can state my point the way I see fit. I am sorry if you are not able to grasp the main idea and the supporting ideas of my paragraphs.

    I said, "historically speaking" which means exactly what it says. History = the Past.

    Defending the slave masters are we? This right here let's me know that I need to be the mature, respectful, professional that I am and dismiss myself from this discussion.

    No wonder the N-word is nothing to you because you can really justify the whipping and beatings of other human beings. It's all so ingrained in your subconscious and identity. Once we get to the deep roots of why anyone would justify that word, the truth comes out and one's true colors are shown. And I can admit the truth goes deeper than just the word itself.

    Here's some reading material for you before I leave...

    (White Privilege) Written by white authors. They actually get it. I hope you read their books and articles.

    http://www.case.edu/president/aaction/UnpackingTheKnapsack.pdf

    http://books.google.com/books?id=hS...&resnum=3&ved=0CCoQ6AEwAg#v=onepage&q&f=false

    http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/~rjensen/freelance/whiteprivilege.htm

    "Racial privilege shapes the lives of white Americans in every facet of life, from employment and education to housing and criminal justice. Using stories from his own life, Tim Wise shows that racism not only burdens people of color, but also benefits those who are "white like him" — whether or not they’re actively racist.

    Using stories instead of stale statistics, Wise weaves a compelling narrative that assesses the magnitude of racial privilege and is at once readable and scholarly, analytical yet accessible."

    http://www.amazon.com/White-Like-Me-Reflections-Privileged/dp/1933368993/ref=dp_ob_title_bk

    Take care of yourself and Happy Reading.
     
  37. Irishdave

    Irishdave Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Since I started this thread let me comment
    Both webmistress and Cerek made good points about African-Americans since 1492. (I just picked this date out of the blue)

    There have been acts of racism during the last 147 years, since the
    emancipation proclamation, there is no debate and there have been extreme cases of exaggeration and there has been over sensitivity in some parts of our population.
    What I am saying is you are both right
    There are so many things that we have been sensitive about
    • 9/11
    • the holocaust
    • Abortion
    • Educational reform
    • religion
    • the economy
    • Health care
    • racism
    what it bolls down to America is a work in progress

    America in not a location it is the Journey

    Now everybody calm down I have to go to sleep I have a DDS appointment in the morning (I hope) I have a bad toothache
     
  38. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Aug 18, 2010

    cerek

    Just like when I'm teaching kids, after taking some breaths I am able to better explain certain things on their levels. One final explanation on the 40 year reference, this is as simple as I can make it.

    When I made that statement, re-read both posts and you will see that nowhere did I imply that there was a massive amount of those crimes happening 40 years ago. I did not put a number on the amount of crimes. So it disqualifies as a hyperbole.

    Most of the numerous horrific descriptions that I gave, where presented in the cases of James Byrd and Michael Donald. Also (Hate Crimes....Unarmed Innocent Blacks killed)....Google Abner Louima, Amadou Diallo, Sean Bell, William McCay...the perps...Justin Sigler, Brian Carrenza, William White, and there are more cases. I don't have time to sit here and do the research for you.

    Try this: "Number of hate crimes against blacks, religious groups rise." (2009)
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/2009-11-23-hate-crimes_N.htm

    A Pandemic of Hate Crimes Targeting Blacks: 2009
    http://imagine2050.newcomm.org/2009...c-in-america-is-hate-crimes-targeting-blacks/

    Just Google and you'll have all the evidence you need. Don't get distracted by the crime descriptions, the point is they are racially motivated hate crimes and murders. You should realize that I don't need to list every type of crime description in my previous posts.

    Finally, you are confusing my numerous graphic descriptions with the amount of cases that happened. The 2 are not related.

    I said, "historically speaking, actually as little as 40 year ago."

    Final Interpretation: All of those things happened in the past and are a huge part of American History. And SOME individual cases happened as little as 40 years ago, maybe not as many lives were lost to make it mean anything to you, but they did happen. One case is way too many. And there are many cases that don't make the news or go to trial.

    End of discussion for me.
     
  39. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2010

    Perhaps my word choice of "permission" has connotations I didn't intend. No one needs permission to use words. But some bigoted people, who would ordinarily only use that word in the privacy of their inner circle of friends, claim they can use the word publicly since many black people use it.

    So when I say "permission", I mean that some people feel powerful being able to say that word under the guise that it's now socially acceptable.

    It's only my opinion, but I think it's a word best left as a reminder of atrocities against a race of people and shouldn't be flung around in a casual manner.
     
  40. ekk5968

    ekk5968 Rookie

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    Aug 18, 2010

    The use of the "N-word" (i feel ridiculous just having to type it like that) does not hold the same meaning as it held 50 years ago. It funny to me that people who are not a part of the group which so called is able to use the word can tell people who are in the group when and how the word should be used and how or how not the owrd can be used...so backwards!!!!
     
  41. Special-t

    Special-t Enthusiast

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    Aug 18, 2010




    I beg to differ that the word does not have the same meaning as it did 50 years ago, in that I've heard (in recent years) people use the word with it's most despicable meaning (mostly in states where I've lived aside from California). So, to some, it does not hold the same meaning, but to others, it is still loaded with hatred. If black people want to use the word - I'm sure they are not using it to despise themselves or other blacks. But, it's not always possible to know the hearts of other races who use that word.
     

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