DO's and DON'Ts of Job Seeking

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by SCTeachInTX, Jul 21, 2011.

  1. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2011


    Some of you have asked for a list that might help you on an interview...:cool:

    Do: Send a cover letter/letter of interest to the P once you have an interview and bring extras when you come in for the interview ~ Just in case someone is there that does not have a copy

    Do: Come dressed in a professional outfit, styled hair, (not too much cologne or perfume), dress shoes, and a BIG smile

    Do: Come prepared to show your personality. If you sit in the interview and answer questions "correctly" but don't show your personality... you might not win this job. So smile and give a little of yourself.

    Do: Tell about yourself and a little about your professional and personal life.

    Do: Find some way to show humor. People like to see that you have a sense of humor. It shows that you are flexible and are able to deal with the little issues that crop up in a positive manner.

    Do: Try to make the interview a "chat" with a friend. Give little stories about your classroom experiences and use real children in your descriptions of questions they ask.

    Do: Let them know that you want the position. Give them reasons WHY you are the perfect fit. Not only is your knowledge important, but let them know that you want to be vested in the school and that you have every intention of making the school community a big part of your life.

    Do: let them know when you are unsure about an answer. Just say, I am not sure about that. But I would be willing to stay late, take classes and read books to be trained. I am not afraid to ask questions and I PROMISE to have many.

    DON'T: Try to answer a question that you do not understand or do not know the answer to. Just concede that you have some things to learn, but you bring unique experiences that will enable you to quickly adapt and figure out any problem or program.

    DON'T: Allow the interview to be a round robin question-answer session where you are ping ponging answers, but not really receiving any feedback. Ask questions about the questions they ask. When asked, "How would you handle a child with severe emotional outbursts?" Answer the question, and then ask a question, "What are the procedures in place within your school that teachers follow when a child is having this kind of problem?"

    DO: Think before you answer a question and try to infuse that humor whenever possible into your answers. Make sure that your answers are knowledgeable and that you have studied up on the district, their programs and the initiatives that the school has in place.

    DO: Look at the person asking the question, but answer the whole group when you are interviewing.

    Don't let experience, or lack of experience be a stumbling block. Tell them that your experience will help you to adapt to a new environment quickly and that you work well with others. Or tell them that your newness in the field of education is a bonus because you are willing to stay late, come early, and soak up the experience from teachers that have already been successful on your team.

    Do: Tell the team that you are excited about being a part of the culture of the school and look forward to helping at PTA Meetings, helping with parent education, and helping with student clubs at the school.

    Do: SHOW your energy and enthusiasm.

    DON'T come across as a know it all that cannot be taught new tricks. That is the quickest killer of someone that has experience. When an interviewee comes in and seems very narrow minded about current programs in place and only discusses the programs they had at their former school, the team will wonder about you.

    PLEASE: PLEASE FEEL FREE TO ADD to these suggestions!!!!:)

     
  2.  
  3. MsMar

    MsMar Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 16, 2007
    Messages:
    2,771
    Likes Received:
    53

    Jul 21, 2011

    What great tips. Thanks for taking the time to share that.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2006
    Messages:
    27,534
    Likes Received:
    6

    Jul 21, 2011

    Don't spend so much energy on why it's a good fit for you that you forget what they want to know: whether you're a good fit for them!

    Don't put all your eggs in one basket. Apply everywhere until you sign a contract.

    Don't assume that your qualifications are unique. Many applicants have their Masters, many applicants have outside experience, many applicants have what you have. You've got to sell YOU as well as your qualifications. That's why they're bothering to interview you.

    Don't assume that you know more than they do. Their school hasn't been shut down by the state, and parents aren't outside picketing. So you can probably assume that they're doing at least some things right. Give them, and their way, a chance before you assume that your experience (or what you learned in school) trumps their experience.
     
  5. Irissa

    Irissa Cohort

    Joined:
    May 2, 2005
    Messages:
    534
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2011

    Do: Tell about yourself and a little about your professional and personal life.


    I've heard it both ways on this Do/Don't tell about your personal life.
     
  6. MrsCK

    MrsCK Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 9, 2011
    Messages:
    110
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2011

    Thank you so much for this!! Very helpful. I really hope they see me as the best fit for the school I'm interviewing at Tuesday! I will try to remember all of these tips! :)
     
  7. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2005
    Messages:
    840
    Likes Received:
    9

    Jul 21, 2011

    how personal?

    Sometimes, I end up telling stories about my children... which then lets everyone know that I have some (I have 4). I'm not always sure this is a good thing. On one hand, I want them to know I have professional as well as personal experience with the age group, child development issues, etc. (my kids are high school, middle, and elementary currently and they are on all ends of the spectrum as far as challenges for a teacher.).

    Thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2011
  8. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2011

    I think I would stick to telling stories about the children in classes that I have taught. I think that as a mother we have a definite perspective because we are the center of the universe for our children for most of their lives. And that will look and feel different than the children that we teach in our classes.

    However, being the Mom of four is definitely something that I would bring up when they ask about you. I also personally feel that teachers that have children are more in touch with parents and the needs /concerns of children. Does that mean that I look specifically for someone with children of their own? Nope, I just find that to be true because you are coming into the teaching profession with a unique point of view that some have not yet experienced.
     
  9. SCTeachInTX

    SCTeachInTX Fanatic

    Joined:
    May 27, 2009
    Messages:
    2,972
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jul 21, 2011

    I believe that it is imperative to hear a little about the personal life. Let's face it... In the end the personal life is an important part of how well the applicant will be able to handle the position.

    DO: Think on your feet and when the conversation feels not important to the person interviewing... Say SOMETHING that will catch their attention so that they FOCUS on you.
     
  10. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2011
    Messages:
    3,224
    Likes Received:
    147

    Jul 21, 2011

    Right now, my horses and riding are probably the biggest part of my personal life. Where I got hired I mentioned them in my second interview and he started asking me if teaching horses and students were similar. It was kind of fun to talk about it in those terms. He also mentioned that they had a parish member who had a farm and if I was hired he would see if he could board my horse. He did give me his contact info but I ended up going to another barn where a dressage trainer was but I thought that was really nice.
     
  11. Rainbowbird

    Rainbowbird Groupie

    Joined:
    May 6, 2011
    Messages:
    1,359
    Likes Received:
    22

    Jul 21, 2011

    The point about not letting the interview become round-robin and one-sided is a good one. I let this happen in one interview and it just felt wrong. There was no give-and-take, and if I had thought of this beforehand, I might have been able to curb it and get the interview on better footing. As it was, they just asked me questions very robotically and blandly, and I really didn't get a chance to shine, IMO.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. ally06,
  2. Missy
Total: 173 (members: 3, guests: 147, robots: 23)
test