Don't want to leave, but...

Discussion in 'General Education' started by lily1989, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 27, 2016

    I may not have a choice.
    Last year I resigned (said it was commute) from a sped job where I had ZERO support, was getting physically hurt, school was falling apart and it actually was a bad commute.
    I landed my dream job teaching 1st grade. Now, I was given a very difficult class. I've gone for support but haven't gotten much. Push has come to shove. P came in and observed and said she has serious concerns but is here to support me, that it will take a lot of hard work but I can do it but she is very concerned and hasn't moved kids like this is in 12 years. She has come in and done some teaching herself. Never got any specific feedback so asked to meet with her after break.
    I know in this district you can resign over the non-renew.
    If I do have to resign, will I be able to get a new teaching job??? I love teaching and don't want to leave. I'm working so hard and am heartbroken. It's dec 27 and I'm posting this from my classroom while rest of building is empty.
    My question is IF I have to resign after all this, how will I ever be able to land another job?
     
  2.  
  3. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    503

    Dec 27, 2016

    Before you worry about resigning or being non-renewed, maybe everyone here can give you some pointers for the rest of the year? It's not too late to turn it around - I'm in my first year and my class was difficult - two students were moved to another class, which helped a lot, but I still have a few that I struggle with. But I asked for help, tried EVERY suggestion I got (even if it was just to find that that particular method wasn't for me - I even tried one that was so bad for me that when I told it to my AP, she looked at me and said, "Yeah, you're screwed. Get rid of that."), and my class has improved tremendously from the beginning of the year. I have a student who spent the first 3 weeks of school ignoring every direction I gave, doing whatever he wanted, destroying pencils, and crawling around on the floor while I taught. That same child now (mostly) follows directions, asks for help when he starts to get stuck and frustrated, sits with the class during lessons, and while he's not doing perfectly, he's doing way better than he was at the beginning of the year. He participates. But I had a LOT of help getting to that point.

    What are some of the difficult behaviors you're seeing in your class? What are one or two MAJOR things that need to change so you can teach? Don't try to fix everything - pick one at a time, and focus on that. When it gets better, pick another one. What have you tried so far for behavior management? What does your discipline/consequence system look like?
     
    lily1989, Backroads and vickilyn like this.
  4. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 27, 2016

    1. No repect for classroom materials or procedures. Many just do what they want in terms of how they treat glue sticks/erasers/class library.
    2. TALKING DURING INSTRUCTION. Like yelling across classroom at each other or just not listening.
    3. Refusal to comply: a few just will not read or sit where they're told

    I've tried:
    Behavior charts (not helpful, they just compare them to one another)

    Logical consequences

    Office referrals

    Parent communication
     
  5. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    503

    Dec 27, 2016

    How many warnings do students get? Are you consistent - does EVERY SINGLE OCCURRENCE of a behavior receive the same consequences or do you let things slide? How often do you practice procedures, expectations, and routines?

    Read "The First Days of School" by Harry Wong - I'm reading it as part of my development goals for this year, and the chapters on behavior and classroom management are life changing. And I'm not exaggerating.

    Choose a system. My school uses BIST - which basically consists of ONE warning for a hurtful or disruptive behavior, then safe seat, buddy room, recovery room, then principal - and they have to work their way back through each stage to get back to the classroom. If your school has a schoolwide system, learn each aspect of that; or find something that is easy for you to implement in your classroom. It really doesn't matter too much which system you use as long as you are consistent. As soon as you stop being consistent (and I'm saying this from experience!), your kids will know that you don't mean what you say and will do whatever they want. The goal is for them to know that you mean what you say, and there will be follow through every single time. It's exhausting, but it will make everything else a lot easier in the long run.

    I'm not an expert by any means, but I've spent all of first semester working on this so I know how it feels to feel like your class is completely out of control! Use your winter break to map out procedures. If they're not doing something how you want them to, how do you want them to do it? Teach it, model it, and practice over and over and over and over and over again. You'll get sick of hearing yourself say it. But show your kids that your expectations must be followed. If they're not? Practice again. And again. And again. Until they do it right. And then day one when you get back, teach the procedures you've planned out. Teach, model, practice until they can do it how you expect them to do it. It doesn't even matter what "it" is - if you don't like how they're doing something, teach them the correct way. Especially in 1st grade - in my state Kindergarten isn't required, so 1st graders sometimes have no school experience. I don't know if that's true of where you are, but it could be a factor. Teach them how to behave in school.
     
    lily1989 likes this.
  6. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2014
    Messages:
    11,266
    Likes Received:
    2,805

    Dec 27, 2016

    Since you must be certified SPED, have you considered getting into things like token economies? I am not a huge fan of behavior charts, office referrals in first grade are seldom efficient, only serving to draw attention to the fact that the teacher is not in control.

    If you haven't looked into Daily 5, I would like to suggest it, or at least elements of it. Structure and following rules and organization are part of the program, and somewhere or somehow, you need to find a way for them to be successful. Praise without earning it is hollow and they can spot that a mile away, while praise that has truly been earned can change everything.

    You need to decide if you are giving up or willing to roll up your sleeves and get to work. Your post sounds like you are giving up, not invested in this class. You don't need to make them perfect, but you need to work to show growth, not only for the students, but for yourself as a teacher, if you really want to continue teaching. Turn this gig around, get experience, and then you can look for a better district if you want. Walk away from this job, making it two failures in a row, and you most likely will be relegating yourself to future jobs as bad as your last two, or worse. That sounds depressing, doesn't it?

    I'm with Miss-M - roll up you sleeves, seek help, contact instructors from your college, ask the admin for help, ask coworkers, and spend your time training yourself to teach them more effectively. Fwiw, I spend a lot of time on the computer learning more about dealing with student behavior. There is a wealth of information available if you have the drive to find and learn it.
     
    lily1989 and HeartDrama like this.
  7. hummingbirds49

    hummingbirds49 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2016
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 27, 2016

    Thank you all for your feedback!
    I guess the frustration is coming from the fact that I have asked for support and havent gotten it. I am hoping that will change when we come back from break.
    Thank you for your words-you have helped me to get off of my pity party and get busy! Lots to do to prepare and turn things around after break. I appreciate your advice and will be implementing it!!!
     
    HeartDrama likes this.
  8. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2005
    Messages:
    5,280
    Likes Received:
    748

    Dec 27, 2016

    Some places just aren't supportive of struggling teachers so you have to find support yourself. You've found this site and asked for help here so you are on the right track. Bookmark this site and read it and as many professional books and teacher blogs as you can during the break.

    What are your top three concerns?
     
    lily1989 likes this.
  9. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 28, 2016

    Yes sorry, I accidentally signed on with my old username!
     
  10. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 28, 2016

    I posted them above. Essentially just not listening and talking through instruction, not respecting materials and not respecting one another or complying. A lot of talking back or refusal to participate in certain activities
     
  11. McGonagall

    McGonagall Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2016
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    16

    Dec 28, 2016

    When you say not respecting materials, what do you mean?
     
  12. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 28, 2016

    Throwing and breaking pencils
    Ripping apart erasers
    Using sticky notes to write notes
    Not even attempting to put library books away in the right place
     
  13. McGonagall

    McGonagall Rookie

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2016
    Messages:
    33
    Likes Received:
    16

    Dec 28, 2016

    I've not seen that in a classroom (yet). However, may I suggest a few things?

    My second job is for a local youth organization. I am our education program coordinator as well as our lead learning center program staff. By the end of the long summer, (our busiest time of year), I was finding that our supplies were horrendously depleted. It was so bad that kids would not even try to hide their destruction - they would rip up cards in front of us, toss their book on the couch and walk out, break pencils or waste paper...it was bad. And I was quite tired of it, especially when I was using such a large part of my budget to stock the room.

    So here is what I did.

    First, I cleaned out the library. It seems like a mean thing to do, but it helped. We had so many books crammed in our shelves that, quite frankly, it was impossible to find what you were looking for. I tossed or donated the old and crummy books, and soon we were left with pretty bare shelves. I used some of my budget to buy new, popular books. The shelves only contained what kids were interested in, and I kept a chart by the bookshelves so that, if there was a book that they wanted, they could place it on the "wish list". Our library really is just a few bookshelves and there was no check out system, so books can't be taken home (much like a classroom library, which is really just a teacher's creation). This new system helped the books stay where they were, and it also helped ME notice when a book went missing. The kids were not overwhelmed with choices and they also were able to take ownership of the books/library through maintaining the wish list. Consider class jobs to keep the library area organized and clean. We have a program at my facility of middle schools who do volunteer work within the building, and part of their job was my library - keeping it cleaned, organized, and also showing leadership to the younger kids to put books back where they were found. The same can be done with classroom jobs.

    As for supplies? Gosh darn, I had HAD it! We have a closet in our room (keep in mind - our learning center is no bigger than a small classroom, with eight computers lined up against the wall, two tables with chairs and four bookshelves. We have a couch, too). So anyway, the closet. I took ALL our pencils, pens, markers, crayon boxes...I took it all. I took the paper. I took the decks of cards. I bought one of those long show organizers and I stocked it up with all our supplies and then locked the door.

    Our kids have membership cards that they're supposed to bring with them, so we went to a check out system. Didn't have your card? Solve your problem. Better ask a friend. But whoever's card was in that slot, the item was their responsibility and there were consequences if the item was not returned or returned in poor condition. Three strikes, you're out.

    Make classroom membership cards in Microsoft publisher. Buy bulk lanyards on dollar tree's website. Tell the kids that the room and its supplies are THEIR responsibility, and it's time that they treated them with respect. Do not waver. If they don't have their card, too bad. Better borrow a pencil from a friend. I know it's first grade but we have six year olds at our facility that handled this system and it changed my entire world. It was not without fault, and it takes a lot of micro managing on your part (when there are simply not enough minutes in the day), but eventually the system is self-sustainable and there's not as much responsibility on your shoulders to maintain it. You can even, eventually, give a responsible child of "checking in" the item or checking items out.

    As for pencils, I also had pencils made (there are cheap sites out there to do it) that showed they were MY pencils that I was loaning out. There was no question about whose pencil it was that was broken on the floor, because it was dark blue and said my name or my organization's name.

    It might be worth a try to adapt this to your classroom.
     
    lily1989 likes this.
  14. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    503

    Dec 28, 2016

    As frustrating as these things are, also bear in mind that 6 year olds often DON'T KNOW that there is a correct way to use these supplies. Classroom libraries are tough - do you have a system to know where books go that is accessible for students? Because my 2nd graders struggle with fiction vs nonfiction, let alone any kind of genre. Have grace - remember that they are 6 and some of these may not be entirely out of spite or disrespect; it's just how kids are. Come into the new year with the mindset that, "oh my goodness, you guys. I completely forgot to teach you how I want these things done! Let's learn and practice so we can take good care of our classroom." Whether you already taught them or not, let them know that you have high expectations and you recognize that they may have been unsaid, unpracticed, or unenforced and that will change moving forward. Be firm, but don't act like they're in trouble or you hate them for it. It's a process and they legitimately often don't know that there's a better way to do things.
     
    lily1989 likes this.
  15. Leaborb192

    Leaborb192 Enthusiast

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2016
    Messages:
    2,407
    Likes Received:
    1,180

    Dec 28, 2016

    ,
     
    Last edited: Feb 13, 2019
    lily1989 likes this.
  16. Mr Magoo

    Mr Magoo Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 16, 2016
    Messages:
    261
    Likes Received:
    56

    Dec 28, 2016

    .
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2017
  17. miss-m

    miss-m Devotee

    Joined:
    Oct 25, 2014
    Messages:
    1,078
    Likes Received:
    503

    Dec 28, 2016

    It's really pretty irrelevant - these behaviors are disruptive to the learning environment regardless of whose property it is. As soon as the property is destroyed, the teacher still has to worry about students now coming to her with complaints of, "I don't have a pencil/eraser/whatever!" Students need to be taught how to take care of classroom supplies - whether they're community supplies or individual.
     
    teacherintexas and lily1989 like this.
  18. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 28, 2016

    They are community supplies
     
  19. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    73

    Dec 29, 2016

    I noticed you mentioned that you had received no support from your P in your second post, but in your opening post you did say that your P came in to do a model lesson. I do feel that was helpful, though you should've taken notes during your P model lesson and worked to incorporate those strategies into your own teaching. That said, I do feel your P should've helped you to incorporate some of those methods with your own. It sounds like your administration wants to be helpful to you, but are occupied with other tasks. On the other hand, you could be dealing with an administration which refuses to hold students accountable and discipline them- these situations make for a stressful working environment when the P doesn't listen to the teachers. I don't know, only you can decide but if you are really this stressed out then you can give notice and leave mid year to seek other employment. There are private schools where the students are disciplined and with good supportive admin. There are jobs outside of the teaching field as well, such as a paraprofessional. If you want to keep said positions, please research "student centered learning" and work to incorporate this into your classroom as it will allow students to talk and move around while still being engaged. Use heterogeneous grouping and do not pair talkers together during these cooperative activities. I'm taking a guess, but it sounds like you're working a charter district? If so, you should consider moving to a public district with more support or a private school.
    :)
     
    lily1989 likes this.
  20. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 29, 2016

    Thanks! No, I am in a regular public elementary school. I hear private pays less and you have no job security?
     
  21. Secondary Teach

    Secondary Teach Companion

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2016
    Messages:
    181
    Likes Received:
    73

    Dec 29, 2016

    Well it depends actually, some of the more rigorous college prep K-12 private academies tend to pay more than your typical run of the mill private school. Typically, the more well off the private school is, higher the enrollment is, the better area it's located in, how well of the parents are, and tuition of the school it will pay more. But, you may need to apply and interview with some to be sure. In contrast, while some of the inner city private schools may pay less- they tend to have fewer students, more involved parents, more supportive admin, and the admin usually deals with any behavior problems. You also have more freedom in your teaching. I teach in a catholic high school, myself but have no experience in a public school.
    :)
     
  22. jteach89

    jteach89 Companion

    Joined:
    May 20, 2012
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    10

    Dec 30, 2016


    I understand your frustration! I am a first year grade 1 teacher. Taught prek and 3 year olds for the last 3 years and its hard. I feel like I have an OK handle on classroom management but I have a few behavior issues in my class and chatty students. Like many have said its about your rules, routines and procedures. For the classroom materials, you may have to show them how to use a pencil or glue, how to use an eraser, how to put it back. Then have a student model how to treat the materials and then let the class demonstrate how to use the materials. And then give them a sticker or class points (class dojo). Only to the kids that do it the right way and it should be immediate so it can be reinforced.

    In terms of teaching, I also feel that my structure hasn't always been the greatest so
    a lot of times I reflect. How is my transition? What are students expected to do once they arrive on the rug or to their desk? Timing/pacing of lessons? For me, my problem kids I try not to stay on the rug too long or set a timer.

    And for the ones who don't comply not sure what your style is but they need consequences for their behavior.
    If you want to be negative you may have to take away something they like or no prizes for them on Fridays when its prize box day.
    If you want to be positive you could say, I would like you to read for 5 minutes and if you do I'll give you a sticker. For 10 minutes you get 3 stickers something like that..

    Overall teach explicitly the desired behavior and model, immediate praise/reward for the desired behavior. After a while, once most get it you can fade the extra attention. And be FIRM and consistent. Remember you are in charge and you are in control. And also as teachers, not sure what class setting you are in but I'm learning that my reaction to certain behaviors can either make it worst or better. So for my real bad ones, I try not to react as much. (But its hardo_O)

    I hope things work out ;its not going to happen overnight but you've made it this far, keep us posted!
     
    Secondary Teach likes this.
  23. AdamnJakesMommy

    AdamnJakesMommy Habitué

    Joined:
    Jul 1, 2012
    Messages:
    919
    Likes Received:
    40

    Jan 2, 2017

    I teach middle school and so I, obviously, have to have excellent classroom management to effectively teach at all. I have "houses" set up in my classroom. Each house competes with one another for points. I give points for homework, attendance, and random things like (I ask a question and see which group gets a hand up to answer correctly kind of thing, or I will ask a question, take up answers and tally for each group). I take away points for: messy caddies/tables (this could be your messed up classroom supplies), leaving chairs pushed out (really if I have to push it in, all it takes is me saying "I see some chairs out in the blue group that I need to push in--and whola, somebody from blue still packing up will magically push in all the chairs), being out of seat, talking during instruction, blurting out, etc.

    I find that the less you often you have to pause and figure out who the specific problem is and point out one particular individual, the more successful you will be in getting the whole class redirected and back on track. For example, I will say "there is some talking over in the Green group right now, the group is about to lose points" (inevitably there is always the one kid who the other kids listen to who will give them the look or the "shhh" that will get them quiet)--magically, the entire room gets quiet at this number. What is really great about this is I don't name names and I don't have to hear "but it wasn't me!" or "so and so was asking me a question." I can't stand trying to teach while simultaneously playing detective to see where the mumbling is coming from, I have my groups oriented in a way so that so long as my ears detect the general direction--I know which group has the talker(s), and all I have to do is say the group name, no one specific----it just saves me time and stress.

    Every time I issue a progress report (approx. every 3 weeks), I give up winners' prizes and reset the game. You will have to figure out what works best for your kids, but my first placers get a homework pass, candy, and are excused from the tri-weekly notebook quiz and are allowed to listen to music while working on their computers (read theory, learning farm, etc.)---they love that last bit. 2nd place gets a homework pass and candy. 3rd gets nothing but a better luck next time.

    It is highly effective for me, so much so that two of the remaining three 7th grade teachers have also implemented it this school year.

    Edited: Just read the post above mine. Absolutely agree--never show students something bothers you. One of the other teachers on my hall really lost control early in the year because of this. My students have never heard me yell or get upset in any way, shape, form or fashion, they know nothing ruffles my feathers. Never engage in a power struggle---issues with individuals should be handled away from the other students---conference in the hall, for example.
     
    Upsadaisy likes this.
  24. lily1989

    lily1989 Rookie

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    31
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 9, 2017

    I posted on here a couple of months ago. My P was concerned about my instruction and management. I took her critiques and have done every single thing she has said. I have had a growth mindset, hard-working and positive attitude.
    Yesterday I had my mid-year meeting with her and she said I am getting needs improvement and basically said if I don't improve, I will be non-renewed.....the thing about my P is, she doesn't ever recognize the good that anyone is doing, and once she has something in her head she stays with it (others in my building have verified this). It is my first year in this building, I am a new teacher. She hasn't even come to observe much of these changes. She also has told me I shouldn't be implementing some of the things (such as specific visuals) that SHE TOLD ME to implement because she says at this point my kids shouldn't need them.
    So I'm feeling beyond angry to be honest, because I spent my entire Christmas vacation in school, spend every weekend in school, work 14 hour days, have DONE EVERYTHING she has said to do, collaborated with everyone I can, and I am seeing big improvements (not saying it is perfect, but I dont think I deserve this). She blames me for their behavior in specials...when I am not even there!!! I resigned from a teaching job last year because of commute. I am thinking I may need to resign from this toxic environment. What are your suggestions? I am very nervous I wont be able to get another job because I just resigned last year and then will resign again.
    I have also begun looking online into other jobs outside of teaching; but all need prior experience in their fields. I am beyond discouraged right now.
     
  25. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Maven

    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2008
    Messages:
    5,030
    Likes Received:
    1,496

    Feb 9, 2017

    Tearing up/breaking supplies is not just kids not knowing how to properly use them. This is blatant disrespect and property destruction. Have you spoken to the parents about this? Maybe they need to have their own supplies and be responsible for them since community supplies are giving them a no care attitude.
     
  26. jteach89

    jteach89 Companion

    Joined:
    May 20, 2012
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    10

    Feb 9, 2017


    I'm sorry your going through all of this. For all new teachers admin should be the most supportive because it's very VERY challenging. To me how can you expect children to learn, if the teachers are not supported by admin? That tells a lot about her when it all boils down to providing the best education for students. I have to remember to forgive myself because I know too Im not perfect either! No one is perfect. You learn from your mistakes. At the end of the day these are children and you know you tried your best to help serve them.
    I can only suggest on what you could do but at the end of it all I hope you'll make the best choice that works out for you. Perhaps you could try to stick out the year or until June and then resign. At least you'll have a full school year experience. In the meantime you could be job searching so that way you'll have a job already lined up. I know its easier said than done but keep up the good work. Your doing a great job. It may not be 100% where you want it to be or what admin wants it to be but you know you tried your absolute best. You're not a robot and it takes YEARS to be an effective teacher. So they should be more understanding of that.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. YoungTeacherGuy,
  2. Iris1001
Total: 423 (members: 2, guests: 398, robots: 23)
test