Don't I have a right to be disappointed?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by holliday, May 24, 2010.

  1. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

    Joined:
    May 8, 2008
    Messages:
    8,558
    Likes Received:
    1,671

    Jun 1, 2010

    It's probably semantics, as I was honestly disappointed in the actual student. Actually, I was steamed, especially after being stuck on the phone with his dad for a half hour as he used me as a therapist to explain why his marriage failed and his ex-wife was ruining his son (all laced with a ton of profanity). I probably sugar coated my own feelings to extricate myself from the conversation faster.
     
  2. education2caree

    education2caree New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2010
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 1, 2010

    I don't think there is any thing wrong in using that word and i don't thing its an issue.
     
  3. Silmarienne

    Silmarienne Cohort

    Joined:
    Apr 26, 2007
    Messages:
    541
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 1, 2010

    Some people object to any kind of personal reaction from you, ie, "I was very disappointed". Maybe in the future you should carefully edit out all personal response and stick to the facts... I think the parents will find that both less personal and more harsh, but they won't be able to say anything against it.
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2006
    Messages:
    7,946
    Likes Received:
    4

    Jun 1, 2010

    Been there. So incredibly awkward, yes?! :eek:
     
  5. aj322

    aj322 New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 5, 2010
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    0

    Jun 5, 2010

    This is the biggest problem with kids these days. Of course dissapointed is an appropriate word. Kids should have to accomplish something before everyone tells them how wonderful they are.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. YoungTeacherGuy,
  2. DiamondGirl
Total: 310 (members: 3, guests: 268, robots: 39)
test