DOL

Discussion in 'High School' started by hammer2, Jul 17, 2007.

  1. hammer2

    hammer2 Rookie

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    Jul 17, 2007

    I'd like some ideas on using DOL for 9th grade English. I'm sure there are many ways of using sentences for students to correct. Are sentences used each day and then corrected orally? Are several sentences given at the beginning of the week and then corrected at the end? Is there a quiz given every so often? Suggestions, anyone?:thanks:
     
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  3. ayotte04

    ayotte04 Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2007

    I think it's easier to digest if you do just a few every day. That way it's short and sweet practice for the kids....and they don't forget it all by Friday. I haven't had a lot of practice with this, so I'll yield to all the other veteran teachers.
     
  4. lmjcatz

    lmjcatz Rookie

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    Jul 17, 2007

    I used DOL exercises as bellwork fairly often with some of my 9th and 10th grade classes last year-most of the exercises were 3-4 sentences. The students had a couple of minutes to work on them, then we went over them orally as a class. I collected the week's worth on Friday and graded them according to corrected errors-regardless of how the students did on their own, if they corrected everything when we went over it as a group, then they received full credit.
     
  5. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Jul 17, 2007

    I worked with a teacher during a practicum experience who used a sentence daily, and we would correct it as a class afterwards. I don't think she ever assigned a grade, but it was daily bellwork, and didn't necessarily tie into the lesson for that day.
     
  6. EngTeacher15

    EngTeacher15 Companion

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    Jul 18, 2007

    Where do you get the activities for DOL? Do you just make up the sentences, or do they come from a book?
     
  7. inlovewithwords

    inlovewithwords Companion

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    Jul 18, 2007

    I would really like that kind of a resource as well...
    Okay I'm going to ask it...What does DOL stand for? :eek:
     
  8. Mrs. R.

    Mrs. R. Connoisseur

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    Jul 18, 2007

    DOL stands for Daily Oral Language. Yes, there are books of sentences of sentences to be corrected - lots of them can be found at any teacher store. Ours are from (I think) McDougel-Littel and we bought the ready-made transparencies and the quiz booklet, too. I rarely use DOL because it gets boring REALLY QUICKLY for both students and teacher. I also didn't see transfer from DOL to peer revision or student writing.
     
  9. wig

    wig Devotee

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    Jul 18, 2007

  10. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Jul 18, 2007

    When I taught English I did DOL as a warm-up every so often. When we did it we did 3-4 sentences a day. Every month or so we would have a DOL quiz on which students could use thier corrected DOL sentences.
     
  11. EnglishMiss

    EnglishMiss Rookie

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    Jul 18, 2007

    Here's some thoughts (hopefully not too rambling) that might be relevant. Have any of you read/heard Jeff Anderson? I heard him speak last year and I haven't been able to read any of his books (Mechanically Inclined sounds really good. www.writeguy.net) but his talk was thought-provoking. One thing he mentioned: In DOL, we give kids sentences with oodles of errors, so they learn grammar like a roll of the dice: "well, if there's a comma there, must mean that's wrong and I should take it out. If that word's capitalized in the middle of the sentence, must mean it should be lowercased," etc., and they're not really learning any rules of why they're changing it. In Jeff's words "it's like trying to take a drink from a fire hose, you blow them away." I've noticed in DOL as well that the sentences break every rule possible and they're to correct them all, it's too much to take in in 5 minutes. He suggested instead using good examples of punctuation (use examples of good writing from established authors) that just illustrate one or two concepts of, say, ways to use commas. Have the students help you point out where they are, why they're there, then have the students write a similar sentence using the same structure and using the commas correctly. That way it's positive reinforcement, showing and writing good examples, instead of looking at bad examples and correcting them all the time.
    What do you all think? I really like the idea, but it requires having lots of good model sentences from literature! He's actually started a blog, http://www.greatsentences.blogspot.com/ for teachers to post good sentences to imitate and learn from. Does anybody know of any sort of teacher's book that has a collection of these? Other thoughts?
     
  12. ChangeAgent

    ChangeAgent Comrade

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    Jul 18, 2007

    EnglishMiss, I agree!

    In the Writing Center where I went to undergrad, the staff, every week, wrote a grammar rule with sentence as a non-example, and a sentence correctly using the rule (commas, subject-verb agreement, semi-colons, etc.). Perhaps in this vein, choosing one rule a week (or whatever chosen amount of time), then each day providing an example where the rule is incorrectly used, and an example in which the rule is followed may help.

    This allows students to correct the first sentence--and recognize incorrect usage--as well as see the correct use of the rule--and, as you suggested, emulate it, or write their own.
     
  13. lmjcatz

    lmjcatz Rookie

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    Jul 18, 2007

    We have a book with DOL transparencies that coordinates with the literature book, but I rarely use them-I prefer to customize the DOL to reinforce comma usage, pronouns and antecedents, subject-verb agreement, etc.-whatever areas of weakness I find recurring most often in my students' writing. I agree that trying to find random multiple errors of all types can be frustrating for the students, and they don't seem to learn much like that. By focusing on errors in one or two areas, the students do seem to begin to identify the errors in their own writing. I am going to try the Caught ya series with a couple of my classes this year, but probably not until we've reviewed all of the basics (which I'm anticipating will take the first 10-12 weeks).
     
  14. ValinFW

    ValinFW Comrade

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    Jul 19, 2007

  15. wig

    wig Devotee

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    Jul 19, 2007

    My goal was to have them type the entire story when finished, but we ran out of time. They really got a kick out of the stories. I did see a transfer to their writing - especially when it came to writing dialogue. I put two sentences up a day. They copied it into their notebooks skipping every other line and then corrected it in red pen.

    Someone mentioned that you can now get it with a CD so you can print them out. I want to investigate that.
     
  16. hapyeaster

    hapyeaster Rookie

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    Jul 19, 2007

    Giggles in the Middle has the CD. I bought Caught' Ya, Grammar with a Giggle! last year, and never used it. It was difficult for me to follow. Now that I look in the back of the book, Caught' Ya Again, or Giggles in the Middle would be better to buy, because it will get you through an entire year. The first book tells you how to use them, has elem - high school, and I just need middle.

    I used DOL for the first six weeks last year, and then the kids got tired of it. Me too! But, this year, I have an interactive white board and I will be having them correct the sentences on the Promethean Board. NO more overhead transparencies!!!
     

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