Doing Away with Long Term Subbing

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by jen12, Jan 29, 2014.

  1. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Jan 29, 2014

    I heard today that one of my school districts is considering doing away with long term subs.

    You're going to love the justification:

    The Affordable Care Act requires employers to provide insurance for employees working more than 30 hours a week. They want to limit subs to that many hours.

    Now...forget about the fact that subs are shafted in every aspect of work anyway, but limiting hours also limits the ability to afford one's own medical insurance...the very thing that the district doesn't want to pay for either!

    And what does that do to classrooms when a teacher needs a leave of absence? They'll have two subs share the job and nobody gets long term pay? That' will work great for consistency and classroom control!

    The other thing that drives me crazy about this is that on Wednesdays the kids have early out. Subs are required to stay on campus for an additional two and a half hours, even if you're not doing LTS. Other days require subs to stay 45 minutes after school is out. Cutting all of this excess out and counting actual work hours would probably bring the work week down to less than 30 hours. I've also been told that as a sub I'm not an actual "employee" so I'm not clear on why this law would even apply...

    Anyway, just venting. It's amazing how a law intended to help people can be twisted by employers into hurting them instead. :(
     
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  3. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Jan 29, 2014

    It isn't as if many opponents of Obamacare hadn't been saying this all along. If you force employers (and in this case government employers) into a situation where their costs will go up, they will find ways to make sure that doesn't happen.

    Where do you expect the school district to come up with the extra funds for the LTS. Also, many LTSs don't work full year. Do you expect a district to pay for a full year of health insurance or just the few weeks/months the employee is working full time?
     
  4. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Jan 29, 2014

    Someone posted the same a few days ago. Hate it for you all.

    Of course, in my non-education jobs during high school and shortly after, I always kept at 38 hours. Walmart did this as did a grocery store. Point being, I'm not really surprised. Businesses (and schools) are going to do what they can to save money/increase profit.
     
  5. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Jan 29, 2014


    I'm not going to argue the politics here.

    To answer your question about coming up with the funds, I would guess that because LTS is under a "seasonal" type of situation like summer theme park employees or other similarly short term employment that it wouldn't actually meet the restrictions of the law. I spent ten years in corporate human resources before I went into teaching. I'm familiar with benefit administration. Most corporations require a certain amount of time worked before employees even qualify for insurance, often as long as six months. A long term sub job rarely lasts that long.

    I think it's a knee-jerk reaction from the district to be worried about it. I suspect they can squirm out having to provide the insurance without actually taking away the one aspect of subbing that new teachers count on to help them work into regular teaching positions. If not, a whole lot of people are going to be forced to leave subbing. Then we'll be in a teacher shortage like a few years ago.
     
  6. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Jan 29, 2014

    It's sleezy, no matter who is doing it. Employees are supposed to be loyal and hard workers, but the employers treat them like disposable diapers.

    Sad.
     
  7. HeatherY

    HeatherY Habitué

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    Jan 31, 2014

    I think they could get around this by using a third party like they do here. I'm some sort of contractor. Subs can actually purchase health care through the third party, not through the school district- at a reduced rate, but certainly not the rate that the district employees get.

    I don't know what they would do if they couldn't have long term subs. Maternity leave anyone?
     

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