Doesn't want to stop working.

Discussion in 'Third Grade' started by teacher3rdgrade, Sep 10, 2009.

  1. teacher3rdgrade

    teacher3rdgrade New Member

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    Sep 10, 2009

    Hi,

    I have a student who has to have everything just "so". The biggest problem is getting him to transition from one activity to the next. He typically refuses to stop an assignment until it is completed. He's not necessarily working slower than the others, sometimes no one finishes the work, but its time to move on to something else. Any suggestions how I can get him to stop something he is engrossed in? Parents have similar problems at home.
     
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  3. corney

    corney Companion

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    Sep 10, 2009

    Could it be possible he may have a touch of OCD?
     
  4. kacieann

    kacieann Companion

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    Sep 10, 2009

    I would be sure to tell the student exactly when he could complete the rest of his work. I would also keep a timer in the classroom for him to keep track of time and let him know when he has say 5 minutes left.
     
  5. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    Sep 10, 2009

    What if you set a timer exclusively for him to give him that cue that is nearly time to stop working? One of those visual timers- with the three different colors, then he could see it. That way he can prepare himself and be ready to stop when ____ time is over.
    Or even just play a song and when the song is over pencils are down- probably a song they are familiar with and know roughly when it is about to end. As the students manage this and are successful perhaps then you could shorten the song until they can all do it with no musical cue.
    Or you could probably do a finger play or something (If you hear me snap your fingers! If you hear me put your hands on your head type deal) that requires all of the students to drop their pencils or whatever- so a physical cue its time to move into the next activity.
    What have you tried to do? Is it during any and all transitions or is it just surrounding certain activities?
     
  6. newbie23

    newbie23 Comrade

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    Sep 13, 2009

    I had a student like this during my ST. I found that posting a schedule in the room was a must detailing all of our subjects for the day and transitions. Then I typically posted on the board more detailed plans (the names or a copy of the worksheet). It could be a pain but it seemed to help her with her anxiety and time management. The timer sounds like it would be a great addition.

    Also, are you showing any examples or finished products? Sometimes if students see a teacher's example (even just writing) they can get so caught up in trying to mimic that perfection it can become a problem.
     
  7. beatlebug731

    beatlebug731 Comrade

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    Dec 31, 2009

    Break the assignment down into different steps, so that each step can be completed in the amount of time that you have, so that he feels like he has accomplished something in the limited amount of time that he had.
     
  8. mmswm

    mmswm Moderator

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    Dec 31, 2009

    I like the idea of a timer. I also like the idea of breaking something down into smaller chunks so that it can be "finished" without being complete. My youngest son has trouble with stopping something before it's totally finished, then add to that he's a bit of a perfectionist, and his teacher has her hands full. At home, I give a five minute warning to help him change activities...even if its just "turn off the tv so we can go to the store". It really helps.
     
  9. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    Dec 31, 2009

    I find with students like this they need to know right at the beginning of the assignment they have x amount of time to work on it. Also, giving them a 2-minute warning that you will be soon moving on will also work well. I had one child who I gave an eggtimer and he knew when the sand was gone, work on whatever he was doing was also done, whether finished or not.
     

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