Does your school have a crazy wellness policy?

Discussion in 'Early Childhood Education Archives' started by mrsammieb, Aug 25, 2006.

  1. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Okay, I just finished teacher orientation and kids can't bring snacks anymore on birthdays. It is so we are "healthier". Ideally, it is good then everyone isn't eating cupcakes all year long but COME ON? We also have to have an MSDS sheet for everything in our rooms from glue to hand sanitizer!

    Personally, I think it is ridiculous!
     
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  3. chicagoturtle

    chicagoturtle Fanatic

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    Our only rule are that things must be store bought and sent in in their original sealed packaging.. Not sure what MSDS is...
     
  4. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    Material Safety Data Sheet, it is basically a detailed list of what is in the product and what to do if it gets in your eyes or skin or if you drink it.
     
  5. Maithal

    Maithal Cohort

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    Try Popcorn for Birthdays

    How about asking your principal/administration if you're allowed to pop popcorn for birthdays instead. Much healther too I might add. I did this on birthdays when I taught pre-k spec ed because I had so many children w/allergies. One boy was allergic to egg, peanut butter, and dairy and he had asthma. I always felt bad for him, but he was great! He was so mature and easy to please and knew everything about his allergies (i.e. what you could and couldn't have). My students loved having popcorn and were always asking for it. Plus, it saves parents from having to buy something. Offer this as an aternate suggestion. Let me know if you use this idea and what your principal says.
     
  6. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    We have a policy like that, too, and it's also new this year. We ARE still allowed to have cupcakes for birthdays, but most of our other foods are limited. No candy at all (not even a lollipop attached to a Valentines card), no popsicles, no juice that isn't 100% juice...in the end, it's nothing that is of "limited nutritional value." The parents are not happy. Neither are the teachers...some of our math lessons involve sorting m&ms or graphing jellybeans, etc, and we have to figure something else out now.
    Kim
     
  7. mrsammieb

    mrsammieb Devotee

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    I don't understand how if parents aren't happy, teachers aren't happy WHO is happy (other than the nurses?). I guess it is good not to leave the maybe one child out but should EVERYONE have to be involved? I don't think it is so much about allergies than obesity.

    I like the idea of the popcorn. I am sure they could say it is a chocking hazard but I am going to ask!
     
  8. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    I have used Carob( in place of chocolate) for goodies.
     
  9. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I understand that many schools are now trying to limit the amount of sweets children eat, hoping that children will not eat as much sweets at home??? My school also does not allow any cupcakes and sweets on the campus, but, what's interesting, is the type of food that the cafeteria serves our students: pizza, fruit pies, cookies, etc.
     
  10. wdwteach

    wdwteach Cohort

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    NCLB is responsible for this mess. We can't have sweets even at parties. We have a very short list of approved foods and drinks to choose from. What were we teachers thinking when we made these children so fat? :rolleyes:
     
  11. Grade1&2

    Grade1&2 Rookie

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    Our school only allows healthy food, even for lunch. I think it's great, it is so important for children to learn to make healthy choices. Some parents have a hard time at first but they get used to it. We have bright green papers that we put in the lunchbox of kids who brought food that was not allowed.

    I teach in a private school and we promote health. :)
     
  12. wdwteach

    wdwteach Cohort

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    I teach in public school and we would be in major trouble if we told parents what to send in their child's lunchbox.
     
  13. dcnuck

    dcnuck Companion

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    If the schools would continue phys ed like when we were kids every day of the week, there would not be such a problem concerning kids being healthy. My kids rotate p.e., music and computers and art so they don't get p.e. like we did. Then it wouldn't matter if they had the occasional sweets.
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2006
  14. Music Doc

    Music Doc Habitué

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    On the other side of the coin, all eleven of our high schools have multiple soft drink machines placed throughout each building, loaded with sugared/caffeinated drinks!
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    For the past 2 years, at my school, we have initiated a healthy snack program. At least 3 times a week, the students are offered fresh fruit or veggies (e.g. mini carrots or celery sticks) from a bin delivered to every classroom. These are the only snacks that the kids can eat in the classroom (snacks brought from home are eaten at recess). Healthy eating is an important part of our Phys.Ed and Health curriculum, so the kids learn how to make wide choices. Several teachers have special class pot-luck lunches during the year where students bring healthy foods to share. Our students bring their own snacks and lunches, and, while we offer guidelines of healthy choices, I can't imagine dictating (and then enforcing) what the kids bring. Physical activity is very important in our schools--our kids have a 30 minute recess in the morning and a 40 recess at lunch (after they have eaten). They have gym twice a week (40 minutes each period) and as of this September, we are mandated to have 20 minutes of "vigorous activity" daily outside of recess and gym.
     
  16. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    Part of our wellness policy states that no vending machines can be turned on until two hours after children have left the building, and must be off at 12:01 AM.

    As a parent, and as a teacher, I do see the value in limiting kids' food choices. However, I think that an all-out ban on certain items just makes them more attractive. And I do think that celebrations call for a more relaxed food policy. I don't think any child should have potato chips or soda on a daily basis...but to not allow kids a popsicle on the last day of school or a lollipop on Valentine's Day is just too restrictive.

    And as for the post about the school lunches...you should see our breakfasts! They serve juice instead of fruit, they serve doughnuts, poptarts, cookies, honey buns. When the lady from the health department came to give us an inservice about the new food policy, we (the early childhood teachers) attacked the breakfasts. They responded that the doughnuts and such were "fortified" and that if they served a banana, they couldn't serve the juice, because they were only allowed to serve one fruit...but, honestly, what is better for you, OJ or a whole orange?? And what sort of habits are we teaching kids if we tell them that Poptarts and cookies are acceptable breakfast options?? So they can have cookies at breakfast, but not at a class party. How do we expect kids and parents to understand the difference???
    Kim
     
  17. Tbug

    Tbug Companion

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    We have a policy where we encourage parents to bring in healthy birthday treats. A list of healthy suggestions was sent home at the beginning of the year to encourage parents.
    Well, last year I had this one parent who never gave sweets to her kids (and, didn't allow them to watch tv and such normal kid videos like arthor). She complained about everything!
    One day, one of my mothers brought in mini cupcakes for her twins birthday. I set them down on the counter near the door...bad mistake! When sugar-free mom walked in to drop off her kids, she went off on me, claiming that I could not pass those out and reciting the causes of diabetes and it's link to sugary foods. I said that we have not banned these foods and yes...ofcourse I was going to pass them out. Did she want to tell the twins on their birthday that we were not passing their treat out?
    She finally took the cupcakes and she said she was going to the princepal. I said fine...go ahead!
    In the end, it came down to the pastor of the school (who was good friends with this family...go figure!) telling me that I could either not give them out, or, cut them in half (yes...the mini cupcakes). I was not letting this one mother tell me what to do, so I cut the cupcakes, telling the kids that they were just way to big (!) to have a whole one.
    I don't understand why parents think they can make a decisions like that for all the other children!
    I am for healthy snacks and personally always bring healthy food to eat in front of the kids, but this was a bit extreme!
     
  18. benemma

    benemma Rookie

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    That is too bad.....I hate that things have come to that. We're taking all the fun out of school.
     
  19. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    A couple of years ago I heard about this school in Maine that decided to serve students healthy, organic, locally grown food in their cafeteria. The cafeteria workers actually prepared meals on a daily basis. They made organic pizza, lasagna, etc, from these ingredients that were all organic and from the local farms. Isn't that amazing!! In all of my life experience and what I see now, food in the cafeteria always composed of highly processed food that was shipped from who knows where. Chicken nuggets, corn dogs, fish sticks. Walk into your supermarket and read these ingredients. They are not really that healthy. I think it's amazing what this school in Maine is doing. ALSO! Once they began serving their student healthy food, they noticed a decrease in behavior issues and an increase in academics. Students were healthier and happier.
     
  20. kinderkids

    kinderkids Virtuoso

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    Wow........can you imagine the cost of a program like that?:eek:
     
  21. Peachyness

    Peachyness Virtuoso

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    I can't remember if they mentioned how they afford it or not. But the cost is well worth it in the long run.
     
  22. Miss_J

    Miss_J Habitué

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    We are adopting a wellness program this year and it is on the agenda for tomorrow. I can tell you more then. One thing I must say is that we are to encourage wellness and they have cut recess to 10 minutes a day now!?!?!? How does that work???
     

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