Does Your Certification Program or Route Matter?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ScottM, Mar 28, 2016.

  1. ScottM

    ScottM Rookie

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    Mar 28, 2016

    Hi all,

    I'm relatively new to this forum and introduced myself previously, but let me summarize my background and goals:

    -29-year old former engineer with degrees in mechanical engineering
    -want to teach high school math
    -able to move to any US state

    I'm still a ways off from applying to any certification programs, but it got me thinking: do schools care where you went to for your certification program? Would I have better luck finding a job if I graduated from a certification program at a "big name" school as opposed to one at a smaller, more obscure college?

    I was also wondering about certification routes - would I have a better chance to be hired if I went through a traditional route as opposed to an alternate route?

    Thanks for your input.
     
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  3. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Mar 28, 2016

    Your program doesn't make a huge difference. Traditional route does make a huge difference; not only will you be a more attractive candidate, but you'll also be a more prepared teacher.
     
  4. DannieJaeger

    DannieJaeger Rookie

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    Mar 29, 2016

    I do not think it will matter with being hired. My two cents: I did an alternative route after being in the healthcare field for over 10 years and it met my current needs (very cheap, not a lot of time - I did not even do any student teaching) but it made my first few years of teaching and learning on the job very stressful and not so great for my students.
     
    Peregrin5 likes this.
  5. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Mar 29, 2016

    I was hired specifically because I had been out "in the real world" for a decade before completing my teaching certification. Use your life experience as an advantage and you'll be in great shape.
     
    Peregrin5 and NOLATeach like this.
  6. NOLATeach

    NOLATeach Rookie

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    Mar 30, 2016

    Love this!
     
  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Mar 30, 2016

    I mirror what others have said. From my impression, in my local area at least, as long as you come with a credential, and you don't have a rap sheet of bad interactions, you're hired. I think finding certified teachers in math and sciences has become so difficult lately, that they're desperate.

    Definitely play up your engineering past. I wish I had that experience, and have been working on summers to build up similar experiences.

    Anyway, I know at my district, if you show up wanting to teach math, maybe even if you don't have the right certifications, you'd probably be snapped up immediately, and fought over by different schools.
     
  8. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Mar 30, 2016

    I personally recommend traditional route as it eases you into teaching (relatively speaking) compared to throwing you into a classroom which can be jarring and cause potentially good candidates to burn out quickly and quit, as well as be harmful for students whose learning might suffer due to poor teacher preparation.

    But if alt route is all that's available, go for it.

    I did want to say that if you're going to be a math teacher, you would probably qualify for APLE and other loan forgiveness programs. 100% of my loans are forgiven through loan forgiveness programs, and I wouldn't have had to pay for ANYTHING (if I had known about them sooner; I made a few payments before I realized that that was possible, but it still took out about 80-90% of my loans).
     
  9. vickilyn

    vickilyn Multitudinous

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    Mar 30, 2016

    I am an AR teacher, and for the first couple of years I thought I had truly screwed up - I should have gone in debt for the traditional route. However, I started knowing new TR student teachers and new teachers, and I found out that they were not truly that much ahead of where I had been. I was, as an AR teacher, highly motivated to learn more, engage in more professional development, and take my real world skills and quickly integrate them into the field of education.

    OP, you have the education, and any AR will have a training portion that will bring you up to speed with lesson plans, classroom management, and everything else you will need to conquer. I believe that going AR at your age will be advantageous - many AR candidates are middle aged, without classroom experience. Do what is best for you. I was hired quickly, and used tuition reimbursement to acquire my M.Ed., which increased my salary and my skill level. The path will be different for each individual, but you must be honest with yourself about your skill sets and tolerance for learning as you earn. For some people, that is too stressful. Keep in mind that this forum is filled with many posters who have gone TR and are struggling to find a job. There are no guarantees, but your background in math should make you a good candidate to become an AR teacher. Let me wish you the best of luck - I would do it again in a heartbeat.
     
  10. mckbearcat48

    mckbearcat48 Cohort

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    Apr 11, 2016

    Math and science are the "hot" areas right now, so it seems like you could easily link your background to those teaching areas.

    Good luck on your journey.
     

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