Does nyone have any information they could share with me about bi-polar disorder??

Discussion in 'Special Education Archives' started by Guest, Mar 9, 2003.

  1. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Mar 9, 2003

    Is it true that most Doctors will not diagnose a child with "bi-polar" disorder. Does this mean that it is not possible? What does the behavior look like in a child who may be struggling with this? Any suggestions on how to help them succeed in the classroom? The child in question is in 1st grade.....
     
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  3. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Mar 9, 2003

    From personal experience, I know that children are usually diagnosed with 'Probable Bipolar Disorder'. One of my own children was diagnosed at age 10. Don't know what age that changes. We have a little third grader recently diagnosed in my school. These children are volatile - their mood 'swings' can change minute to minute. You may not see a cause to the change. They need calm, stable, neutral feedback and responses. Be ready to remove the child from class to a safe place where he cannot harm self or others. Most children are treated with medication. It is often difficult to find the appropriate dose and type of medication. If you haven't been asked to do so, keep a daily log of behaviors, appropriate and inappropriate. A behavioral modification program should be agreed upon by all parties treating the child. Good luck.
     
  4. AngelaS

    AngelaS Cohort

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    Mar 9, 2003

    Speaking as a person with BP and who has taught a five-year-old diagnosed with it, I will add to the above that a lot of BP kids have light and sound sensitvity. They cannot work with bright lights and lots of background noise. If you can limit that as much as possible, the child will probably benefit. Routines are very important- if you are familiar with autism at all, you may find that some of the same strategies you use with those students will work with this child. :)
     
  5. Guest

    Guest Guest

    Mar 21, 2003

    I am an educator who has bi-polar disorder. Life is affected, but there is hope! I have found what helps me is to have things broken down for me. Too much at once is a little hard for me. Breaking down assignments may be very helpful for that child. Also, allow the child to move in his or her strengths. I have a strength in writing, and it is far easier for me to communicate in this genre than in any other. One thing to be very aware of is destructive behaviors. I can recall points in my childhood that I would just cut my skin or beat my head against the wall because I was so bombarded with my thoughts. One of the biggest things in my condition was the bombardment of thoughts, and I can imagine how difficult that could be for someone of that age (I was not diagnosed and treated until I was a teen, and I vaguely remember any symptoms in the years before then). Those with bi-polar can also have severe depression, which can be extremely dehabilitating for a young child. Impulsivity is also something you need to watch for. I would suggest the child go to a good counselor as well, that could help them through things. Bi-polar is something that will be with me the rest of my life, but I have learned how to cope with the help of a counselor. I don't know what else to say, but I hope this helps!!!
     
  6. Guest

    Guest Guest

    May 13, 2003

    I have a student who may be BP- He's been classified as ADHD, but now we're finding out more (it runs in his family) and seeing behaviors (extreme hi to extreme lo very quickly- Actual look of his face changes) Many BP kids have been misdiagnosed-hence they're being mis-medicated as well!
     
  7. Tara19

    Tara19 Companion

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  8. Guest

    Guest Guest

    May 14, 2003

    Re: Does nyone have any information they could share with me about bi-polar disorder?

    There is a GREAT website about bipolar disorder in children - it is www.bpkids.org
     
  9. Tara19

    Tara19 Companion

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    May 18, 2003

    Does this help you???


     
  10. Unregistered

    Unregistered Guest

    Apr 22, 2004

    My son is in first grade he has bi-polar, adhd, and odd. He does well in school, he is doing 3rd grade work right now. However he gets upset very easy, if the class room is to loud he will start to throw a fit, he will yell at the top of his lungs. There have been many of times he has been sent home early from school. The school want me to put him in special ed, I told them no. I took him to his doctor and got him to write a referral for a wrapp around for him next year, which is an aid hired by the school to work one on one with him, to kept him focus and whatever else he may need. Just remember that your child has every right to be in school just like the next, but the schools dont want to deal with deal. Dont be affraid to fight with the school, to make them help your child.
     
  11. Amanda

    Amanda Administrator Staff Member

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    Apr 25, 2004

    Re: Re: Does nyone have any information they could share with me about bi-polar disorder??

    I have a student with BP this year, and she does the same thing you describe (ultra-sensitive/throwing fits/yelling at top of lungs). She is also violent and has to be removed from the classroom a lot. Since this is kindergarten, we just completed the referral process and she is finally eligible for special services. Special services are usually in the best interest of the child, and the teachers usually have to fight the school to get kids the services they need. I had to go through a lot just to get to this point, and I am just working for an arrangement for next year. The current teacher will never reap any benefits from a referral since the process takes so long. Many parents are weary of the "label," but is worth finding out exactly what the school proposes for your child. For instance, our "special education" program is flexible for each child's IEP. She will only visit the special classroom as needed, when she is out of control and/or needs quiet time (such as those days she is in the irritable mixed state). This is quite helpful because she will can come back later that day instead of being sent home or sent to in school suspension, which were our only options before. Much of the time she does fine in the classroom. You might consider an option like this down the road if the school offers it. I am afraid if he relies on an aide all the time, it will decrease his independence and self-control, which is important for someone with bipolar disorder to learn. I am very familiar with this disorder, so I don't mean to offend. :)
     
  12. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Sep 14, 2006




    All children have the right to be there and learn. I have a child in my classroom who has not been diagnosed with Bi-polar but with ODD. Although, after reading some of the info on these links, there are a lot of similarities. Each day, she makes it very difficult for everyone to learn, including herself. She screams and shouts in class, runs around the room, talks out of turn, etc. Yes, she has the right to an education but so do the other children.
     

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