Does Master's degree = higher pay?

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by mikanna, Nov 17, 2011.

  1. mikanna

    mikanna New Member

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    Nov 17, 2011

    Hi everyone,

    I hope I am posting this in the right section. I am thinking of switching careers and applying for the teacher credential program (CA). I am currently a therapist with a BA in psychology and MA in counseling psychology. From my understanding, a teacher makes more money if she has a master's degree. My question is: Does the Master's degree have to be in education? Would my master's in counseling earn me more as an elementary school teacher?

    Thanks in advance! So happy I found this forum!
     
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  3. elateacher4life

    elateacher4life Cohort

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    Teachers are usually placed on a salary schedule based on their education(units/degrees) and years of experience.
     
  4. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    In most districts they do get paid more, but how much more really varies. In my district, the amount of extra money I'd make a year with the masters doesn't come close to what the masters would cost to get. I calculated that it'd take me about 10-15 years (depending on interest levels from loans) to even break even from the cost of going to get my masters in the first place. However, in my dad's district they are on a "step system" (we're performance pay) and those on the master's schedule move up a lot more. He's at the top end of the scale for experience, and at this point he makes about 20,000 more per year than a teacher with the same experience and no masters.
     
  5. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 17, 2011

    Your graduate degree must be applicable to teaching to move you on the salary scale. Unless you are certified to be and hired as a school psychologist, therapist or counselor, your masters won't bump your salary.
     
  6. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    In my district, the degree has to be in your teaching field, and it's only about $900-1200 more a year.
     
  7. mikanna

    mikanna New Member

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    Thanks for the replies...
     
  8. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    To answer your main question, YES. For me, they counted up the college units in total, so my Masters could be in any field, not just education, for it to count towards a higher pay. I got a nice starting salary when I was a 1st yr special ed teacher, but when I switched gears to SLP & got hired, they counted that previous Masters even though I need another type of Masters for the SLP job I recently got hired for. My starting pay is VERY nice now!
     
  9. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Wasn't your original masters in sped, Ms I? That would be applicable to most school positions. As a matter of fact, speech services fall under the special Ed/student services umbrella in districts near me...so your degree wasn't really in 'any field', it was relevant and applicable to your position.
    My district recently hired someone with a PhD...he is on the salary scale for his applicable masters, however, as his doctorate was neither applicable to education nor the position for which he was hired.
     
  10. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

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    I have two masters - one in MAT and MS in Animal Science. Because I am teaching science, MS counted for RANK I designation and a bump in salary.
     
  11. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Typically yes.
     
  12. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    czacza, for my particular situation, it worked out yes becuase yes, I do have a grad degree in special ed & the 2nd grad degree I'm working on partners up very well w/ special ed, but I was just saying to the OP that my districts would take a degree in ANY field to count towards a higher pay on the payscale.
     
  13. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Really? In these tight budget times? In California?

    So someone could have a non-education related degree in say...animal husbandry or video gaming design or some other non- applicable area and be moved up the salary scale? Sounds like a SPLENDID use of taxpayer money.:dizzy:
     
  14. anewstart101

    anewstart101 Cohort

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    California for you
     
  15. LITeachTeach

    LITeachTeach Rookie

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    AFAIK, in NY, the content of you graduate work doesn't matter. If you have extra graduate credits, you get the extra pay.
     
  16. DaleJr88AmpFan

    DaleJr88AmpFan Cohort

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    In my area, your degree would need to be in the field of specialty. Additional credits earned in education classes will bump us up on the payscale.

    Just be careful though... there are people that over-educate themselves out of a job. In these difficult times, it is cheaper to hire a first year teacher with a bachelor's than with a master's degree. I always suggest to new teacher/my student teachers to wait to pursue their master's degree until 2-3yrs are under their belt. It gives them time to get more comfortable in the classroom and not being in "survival mode". And, it offers them the opportunity to add practical experience for their new (master's) education. In the universities around here, you must have 2 years of experience before you will be accepted into an El Ed master's program.
     

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