Does it look bad to only stay until contracted?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by tamilda, Oct 11, 2014.

  1. tamilda

    tamilda Rookie

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    Oct 11, 2014

    My commute is absolutely awful if I stay any longer than 3:30pm. I'd prefer to rush home as soon as my contracted time is up (3:15pm). But I'm worried that the fact that I arrive and depart EXACTLY at contracted times will make me look bad in the eyes of the principal. For the record, after going home and relaxing for a few hours, I end up working the rest of the evening :( What do you guys think?
     
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  3. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    As long as you get your job done, I don't see how it matters.

    I do usually get to school 20-40 minutes before my contracted time, but there are some weeks where I leave at my contracted time every day. Other weeks I'm there late everyday. No one stays late at my school- it is empty w/in 30 minutes.
     
  4. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    I don't think it will make you look bad. You're supposed to stay for contracted hours, you're doing that. Other than that, if you're prepared to teach, that's all that matters.
     
  5. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    I guess it depends on your Admin. My P shows up at 7:45 everyday - school starts at 8 - and leaves right after school whenever she can.

    We had a PD day and I was in the office as she was getting ready to leave at like 2:45 although the school day ends at 3. She joked that her union's contract said nothing about her having to stay until 3:10 like the teachers' contract. She could leave when she wanted - and she did.

    I always try to leave at contract time because traffic can be a nightmare and I just need to get out of there ASAP at the end of the day.
     
  6. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    School starts at 7:40 and my principal arrives at 7:30. He's normally gone by 4:00-4:30.

    Teachers' contracted hours are 7:15-2:30. Many leave right at 2:30.

    Personally, I couldn't care less whether a teacher leaves at 2:30 or 5:30--as long as they're doing their job!

    During my last year as a classroom teacher, I'd head out pretty much every day at my contracted time. I was extremely productive during my prep time and lunch hour.
     
  7. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    I don't think it matters as long as you get your job done. It's not good to make assumptions based on what time people leave anyway. For all you know, they're putting in way more hours at home.

    I leave pretty much around contracted time, but I do my grading and planning at home. I am basically completely unproductive if I tried to stay in my classroom and work.
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I think that it has a lot to do with your school culture. At my school most teachers leave at contract time.
     
  9. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Honestly, it would be looked down upon at my school if you didn't stay back at least 1 day a week. However, I teach high school and that may be the difference. If we didn't stay back, students who missed quizzes, tests, etc or need help wouldn't have an opportunity to make them up.

    I know of many teachers who are out at contracted time 4 days a week and no one cares, but they do give that one day a week for students who need help.
     
  10. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Our contracted time is way past our dismissal time. Kids get dismissed at 2:45pm. Contracted time ends at 3:30pm. There are basically no students on campus at all by that time.

    Contracted time ending at the same as dismissal time would be a parking lot nightmare.
     
  11. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Ah, I guess that would make a difference. Our contracted time ends only 20 minutes after the final bell, which is rarely enough time to help a student. Contracted time would be 2:30. Every teacher stays until 3:30-4, at least once a week.
     
  12. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Same at my school. I don't know if the admin specifically notices or cares, but other teachers are definitely pretty judgmental about those that leave right away, as if they think they're not dedicated enough or something. Most of the time admin leaves with 30 minutes or so of contract time, but many teacher will stay 3-4 hours late. I have been working really hard at getting back into fitness, and I'm going to the gym almost every day after school. If I leave right at contract time and head over to the gym, I get home around 6:30-7:00. I definitely don't want to stay late at school and get home later than that- especially since I find that if I don't go workout right away, I'm far less likely to go at all. Other teachers see me leaving in my workout clothes and I get a lot of comments like, "Oh I wish I had enough time for that....you're so lucky, how do you do it, do you take a lot of work home at night?" I just try not to let it bother me. At my last school, most teachers were out within 15 minutes of contract time and it was almost looked down upon to stay late (as if you were "sucking up" or something), so it totally depends on your school culture and how badly you want to fit into that.
     
  13. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    I think there will always be judgment about something. I stay after school 3 days a week with an after school club-I'm there with students until almost 6:00. When I left right after dismissal on Friday (I had an appointment) someone made a comment about me leaving already. Honestly, I don't think you can win with some people. I would not change how I did things for that reason.
     
  14. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I usually stay at least 20 minutes over but I'm not doing work. I'm just chatting with our secretary usually. My P doesn't care as long as your work is done.
     
  15. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    It doesn't matter, as long as your work gets done. Some teachers come in early, others stay late, some come in & leave at contracted time. As long as you are there for the contracted time, you should be okay.
     
  16. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    I feel like I'm looked down on because I leave pretty close to my contracted time. People have made comments to my grade level team. But I have a new baby at home and I'm not willing to give up more time with him. I think a big difference from other schools I've been at is that contracted time is only 15 minutes after dismissal, and we're usually not done dismissing students until 5-10 minutes from our contracted time. Everywhere else, I've had to stay 30-40 minutes after dismissal.
     
  17. 2ndTimeAround

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    Well, at my school the teachers that leave as soon as they can every day are also the ones that spend half (or more) of their instructional time showing videos. And/or teachers that hold kids over into other periods so their students can make up work then instead of after school. I consider these things to be more of a management issue but it does cause a bit of resentment among the staff.
     
  18. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Truthfully, I have always left real close to contract time and I never cared what other people do or say. In reply to the occasional person commenting, all I say is "I'm efficient". Like other posters have said, if I am prepared to teach, what I do with my own time is my business.
     
  19. Go Blue!

    Go Blue! Connoisseur

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    Exactly. Many people seem worried about how their co-workers and colleagues view them, but I have yet to meet a co-worker that signs my checks. Thus, I couldn't care less what they think about what I do.

    If my Admin is ok with it, that's all I care abut.
     
  20. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Most admins aren't going to give a crap about when you arrive or leave. They care about your job getting done. If you arrive and leave right at contract time, they'll be fine. If you come two hours early and leave two hours late, but aren't getting your job done, they'll get angry.
     
  21. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    :thumb:

    We try to teach students not to be swayed by peer pressure. Why let ourselves be swayed by the same thing?
     
  22. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    From what I have seen, our admin and the rest of the staff are similar to most others - as long as the job is being done well, then the time (so long as it is outside of contract time) that you leave is okay. We have some who leave right at the end of contract time to beat the commute home, and some who don't leave until 7 or 8 almost every day (ha...wonder who that is). My colleagues are always telling me to get out closer to contract time (or at least soon after), but my admin never mentions that, and instead has mentioned when casually observing that she sees the positive effect of all the extra work I'm putting in. I felt that that was a great way to approach that - as that's directly discussing the quality of what's happening in the classroom, as opposed to the time needing to be spent in the classroom, which will vary for every single person.
     
  23. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    If I were at school for 12-14 hours every day, I would burn out in under a year.
     
  24. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    ...part of this is because there was no major reason to head out earlier (running into horrible traffic, and wife/friends all being in a different city two hours away because of the sudden move), and much because it's the first couple months of a job that I was hired last minute at. I'm working on finding more efficient strategies and naturally will go home slightly earlier (and instead bring some of the work home) when my wife moves down to the area.
     
  25. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    You'll become more efficient in future years and can become part of the crowd that leaves earlier. My first year I stayed ultra late everyday too, to the point that my P made fun of me for it. lol

    I didn't understand how everyone could leave so earlier with all that stuff to do.
     
  26. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Some teachers take stuff home to do. I've worked with several people who take stuff home to work on, after their own children have gone to bed. If it works for them, so be it.
     
  27. chitown

    chitown Companion

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    I always leave after contracted time just because contract time is when the students get out also, and it's just too hard to get out of the parking lot with all the kids and parents leaving also. I don't know if anyone really cares when I come and go. I'm in early every day just because that's my personal preference, and I usually stay at least a little bit late. I would leave at contract time some days if it was easier to get out, but that's because I do work at home after my kids are asleep. I think it would be silly if the P deemed me more or less worthy based on the amount of time I spent at the school, but I do know that it happens.
     
  28. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    I think it would depend on your school. I personally don't care when and where other teachers get their work done as long as they are teaching effectively. If you can get everything done during contract time, that is great. If you take work home because you'd rather work around your family, that is great. If you stay late because you don't want to take work home, that is great.

    The only situation that has bothered me in the past was a teacher in a younger grade would leave at contract time without preparing for the next day and would let her kids play while she did lesson plans and prepped. When I got those students, they were far behind others who had the other teacher who actually taught during the school day. That was horrible.
     
  29. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I will add to my earlier statement-

    As long as they are staying your contracted hours, I couldn't care less when my colleagues are coming and going. But I am a rule follower. Those that habitually sneak in late and out early drive me nuts. At my old school, we ended up having to use a TIME CLOCK because we had several that did this. A time clock. Seriously. And they still had people clocking them in and out, so it didn't work. It just caused people like me extra stress when something came up during my 45 minute commute. Extra long train, car accident, etc... I'd freak out that I was going to clock in 2 minutes late. Or I'd get there super early and the office would be locked. I'd forget to clock in and then it'd look like I was 30 minutes late.
    (People have legitimate reasons for coming late/leaving early at times. Doctors appointment or something. Fine. I've done it, but I always had permission first. I'm talking about the people who did it several times a week. Or even just once a week.)
     
  30. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    I'm still stuck on something. Everyone who leaves at contracted time every day (esp on high school level): when do your students make up missed tests/get extra help? Even those that said contracted time ends 45 min after the students get out- is that always enough time? My tests take at least an hour to complete, assuming they're not missing anything else. Do you ever set aside extra time for those instances or is there a different plan for students who need extra time/help?
     
  31. 2ndTimeAround

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    I typically stay after school for students to make up tests. On the very rare occasion that I cannot stay after making plans with a student, a colleague will often proctor for me. We do favors like that for each other. I always stay a bit late for grading and prepping anyhow, so watching someone's student while I do is no big deal.

    Some teachers, however, have students make up tests the next day in class. I have done this before when a student has made it clear that he will not come to arranged make up times. But I'd much rather he come after school and not miss the lecture the next day.

    I've found that the teachers that typically do not stay until contracted time or right at it, aren't the type that aren't too concerned about best teaching practices to start.
     
  32. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    During study hall or intervention period. They rarely stay after because at least 90% of our students are involved in other activities.
     
  33. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    My high school had a late start on a certain day of the week. Teachers had to be there at regular time and that is when you had to make up tests and stuff. You could also go in for extra help. It is a pretty common thing in my area.
     
  34. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oh, don't mistake my meaning. I said I used to not understand. I now completely understand how they can leave earlier, and why in most cases it's necessary.
     
  35. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Our students can come in at lunch, or during certain periods. Also the tests can be paused and they can complete them at a later time.

    Most of our students take the bus or get picked up right after school anyway, so they can't stay behind.
     
  36. HistoryVA

    HistoryVA Devotee

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    Ah, ok. We don't have study halls or intervention periods and students can't come in during lunches because there are so many different lunch periods. We also have after school busses. With practices/rehearsals/stay backs, there are students at the school until at least 7 pm every night.

    It's always interesting to hear how things run in other schools.
     
  37. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    I have students come in at lunch or before school. If that doesn't work, I'll let the student make up the test during class. If that doesn't work, I will stay late. Most of the students at my school are unable to stay late because they ride the bus, so I rarely need to stay late even for make-ups.
     
  38. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    I have a child that rides the bus home from school before I am able to get off work and I also work 40 minute from home so I do leave as soon as contracted time is up. I do stay late one day a week to catch up/get ahead. My director is very understanding that I have a child at home (most of the other employees either don't have children at home or have a spouse/someone at home) so she doesn't mind that I leave at that time. Sometimes I do end up taking work home with me that I do while watching TV with my daughter.

    When I taught I always got to school before contracted time so students would come into my room before school started to make up missed work or work on homework. We also had an intervention period that they could come in for extra help during the school day so it wasn't necessary to stay late after school.
     
  39. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    It really is cultural. At my last school, lots of people left at contract time. That doesn't happen at my current school. Most people stay at least 1.5-2 hours after dismissal. I'm still struggling to find a balance. Fridays I leave 30 min after dismissal and I don't look back.
     
  40. Jem

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    I come in right before school starts, but I stay at least 1.5 hours after school to get everything done. Sometimes it annoys me when I need to check in with another teacher and they are always gone right after school. If we don't have the same prep time, it makes it impossible to talk with them. But other than that, I don't care at all when people leave. ;)
     
  41. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    I don't think it's bad as long as you're getting work done and doing a good job, it shouldn't matter. Some of the most hard working teachers at my school have to rush out in the afternoons to go pick up children from the school bus or daycare programs. I don't know how it works at your school but occasionally we have option PDs after school (that teachers get paid for.) If you have the opportunity every once in a while to stay after for something special like that I would make the effort, just to show you're flexible if need be.
     

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