Does anyone want to sub their first year?

Discussion in 'Job Hunting & Interviews' started by jillneedsajob, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. jillneedsajob

    jillneedsajob New Member

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    Aug 5, 2006

    I was wondering if anyone wants to substitute for their first year?

    I just graduated in June (Bachelor of Arts in Education with majors in early childhood education and elementary education). The only real teaching experience I have is my ece practicum in grade 1 (3 months long, including a lead week) and my student teaching in grade 2. So I feel I lack enough experience to know what grade(s) I am or am not wanting to teach. I love second grade, but for all I know I could be a brilliant 5th grade teacher (or know that I should completely avoid it at all costs!). Also, I feel subbing would give me experience with the different schools in my area.

    As much as I'm looking forward to having my own classroom, I just don't feel ready for one right away (to be honest, I think I'm scared). I get the feeling from a lot of posters here and from some of my old classmates that subbing is kind of something that people do just because they don't have a "real" job yet (in other words, an unwanted last resort).

    I feel that a lot of people are going to look at me subbing as something I had to do because I couldn't find a full time position versus making the choice to sub. Honestly, I've only applied to two districts. And really, only for one job I knew I didn't have a shot at (4th grade), the other district is just being in the pool. So I haven't even had an interview yet. (there are several positions available that I'm qualified for around my area, so it isn't like there is nothing available)

    So I guess to make a long story short, for anyone that recently graduated (or really for anyone), do you want to sub for your first year of teaching?
     
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  3. MissB

    MissB Companion

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    Aug 5, 2006

    I think it's absolutely fine to sub or take a para position your first year out. Many people feel they would still like some more time in the classroom before having a classroom of their own. If you think that will give you the experience you need to feel confident, then go for it!

    But, at the same time, I think that everyone is nervous their first year! Remember if you sub this year- next year you are going to have your own classroom (hopefully)- and you could be just as nervous then! Good luck.

    P.S. To finally answer your question: I graduated in May and have no desire to sub.
     
  4. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Aug 5, 2006

    I subbed my first year out of necessity. I think it would be great if teachers could sub for a year and then be guaranteed a classroom, but unfortunatley that's not how it goes. It could take a while to find a job. If opportunity knocks take a job.

    Anything new will leave you nervous. Subbing and managing your own classroom. The important thing is to believe in your abilities.

    I'm not against being a sub. I just would rathr take a permanent position over subbing if offered.
     
  5. cactusfive

    cactusfive Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2006

    I went the route of alternative certification so I found it very helpful to sub for a year before teaching. I did not even think of interviewing right away because of lack of experience. I really enjoyed subbing and found it a great way to find not only schools that were a good fit, but grades too. I got to experience a wide variety of classrooms and adapted my classroom from those that I enjoyed subbing in. You also are exposed to a lot of different classroom management plans that will help you in the future. If you don't feel like you are ready to have your own classroom, I would recommend subbing.
     
  6. KRaeLamb

    KRaeLamb Rookie

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    Aug 5, 2006

    I was in your shoes!

    I was in your shoes, in December. See, I greaduated in December and had taught 2nd grade during my student-teaching period (3 months, 3 lead weeks). So, I was a nervous wreck about trying to find a job....middle of the year, any grade, any subject, any school. So, I did a long-term sub job for the remainder of the year. I taught 3-5 grade math and I got to see what each grade was like.

    Also, during this time, I started grad. school to expand my teaching possibilities. I started in Special Education K-12...this way I am keeping my placement possibilities open.

    I strongly suggest subbing....it helped me see where I was best suited in the elementary school (I learned just by watching others and oberving during my planning periods that I don't think I would ever teach Kindergarten or first grade!).

    (PS-I was awarded a job in the high school setting for this fall....talk about a culture shock. I wish I could have subbed in a high school first!! I've never, not even with a clinical, been in a high school as a teacher!!)

    Good luck, and always keep your options open. You never know who will see you and recommend you......and for what job!
     
  7. Ann2006

    Ann2006 Cohort

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    Aug 5, 2006

    If you doubt your abilities and think subbing will be easier, in some ways it can be more difficult, especially with classroom management. I would suggest going straight into teaching. As far as knowing which grade your prefer....when you are out job hunting, you are eligible to teach any grade level on your certificate. I started with 4th for three years, then 6th for one year, then 1/2 year of 8th and 1/2 year of 5th. In the fall I'll be teaching 6th, 7th, and 8th. The point is we teach what they need us to teach so that we can continue working in a field we love.
    If you are lucky enough to get to teach the same grade level year after year and you are not wanting to teach a different grade, then you will be happy.
    If you are like me and like to change it up because you get bored easily, like me, then you will be happiest in a situation where they ask you to switch year to year.
    I enjoy whatever it is I am doing at the time.
    As far as being nervous....it's the nature of who we are as teachers. We worry and we over plan. We make our lists and check them twice!!! We constantly come up with new and better ways to do things and sometimes we keep what works.
    If you did well in college and feel prepared, just dive in and have fun.
     
  8. Suburban Gal

    Suburban Gal (formerly Elizabeth) Banned

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    Aug 5, 2006

    You'll find subbing a wise move. Take on 2 or 3 distrrcts and and see what's out there. Use it to help you decide what you like and to build anything you feel need some work, like classroom management. Quite honestly, I see npthing wrong with it and feel that subbing can only help you - not hurt you.

    Besides, if you do a really good job for a district and they really like you then you can use that as a means to get in full-time as an actual teacher.

    Good luck! :cool:
     
  9. Steph-ernie

    Steph-ernie Groupie

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    Aug 5, 2006

    If that's what you feel you want to do, then that's great. You need to do what's right for you. One thing to consider though - I don't know if this applies everywhere, but where I subbed (so cal), subs don't get benefits. I didn't in the districts I subbed in, and I had some friends subbing in other districts, and they didn't either. So ... if you are married and can be on your husband's insurance, that wouldn't be a problem. I wasn't on any prescription medications at the time, and was fairly healthy, so I just did without health insurance from January till August when I started my regular teaching job. It was fine for me, however, there were a few times when I feared that I was getting sick, and knowing I had no health insurance, it was something I couldn't afford.
     
  10. njeledteacher

    njeledteacher Cohort

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    After having subbed for a couple years while I completed my teacher cert program, I would definitely recommend it to you if you're not sure what grade(s) you want to teach. Keep in mind that subbing isn't the same as being the classroom teacher, and the kids can sometimes give you a hard time, and you're not respected as much ...as sad as it sounds. But, you do get great experience, and the administrators get to know you. The downside is that you may not get called every day and there are no benefits. It's ok to do for a while, but I would definitely keep sending out those applications.
     
  11. Jan Smith

    Jan Smith Rookie

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    Aug 6, 2006

    SEVERAL ways to look at this-
    1. Yes- people will think you could not get another teaching position
    2.Yes subbing helps you - I'm not sure about getting you noticed
    3. The money and benefits are an issue.
    4. Most subbing- unless it is a long term- is not like the real day to day teaching!
    5. Feeling like you are not ready is very normal!
    I subbed for 3 years because I wanted a certain school in a certain district- I earned the respect of the teachers and the principal and got exactly what I wanted.
    6. One more- if you do a "great" job of subbing- they may not want to hire you and just use you as a sub.
    All things to think about- been there and way past now- 24 years later! Good luck on any decision you make.
     
  12. Ann2006

    Ann2006 Cohort

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    Aug 6, 2006

    In the state of Illinois, subs must be fully certified teachers with Illinois certificates. Many who come to sub here are retired teachers or teachers who can't find a teaching position or teachers who prefer subbing because of the flexibility.
    Either way...they are teachers just like all of us.
     
  13. MissFrizzle

    MissFrizzle Virtuoso

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    Yes, subbing is not the same as having your own classroom, but it does give you experience in learning how to deal with certain behaviors, learning how most schools operate on a daily basis, and seeing the things you've learned about set into action by other teachers.

    I subbed. I spoke to my colleauges, and never had a bad experience. I don't have a full time position either, but that is my own fault- I didn't really try to get one with all my heart.

    If you sub, remember not to get to comfortable. Continue to search for that full time position. You will find it.

    You will probably never be observed by anyone as a sub, but this is an even better chance to make up a good lesson and call in the principal to observe you. In teaching, you need to draw attention to yourself. Good LUck
     
  14. WITeach

    WITeach Cohort

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    Aug 6, 2006

    I graduated in December and subbed from December through the end of the year because I did not find a permanent position. I enjoyed subbing for that semester and I think I learned a lot. It was a good first step before getting a permanent job. I think subbing helps prepare you for some of the unexpected things that come up when teaching. Having your own classroom is a much different experience and after having a permanent position, I would not prefer to go back to subbing again.

    I don't think there is anything wrong with wanting to sub. If you decide during the year that you are ready for your own classroom, ask the principals at the schools you are subbing at to observe you. Then, you can get good letters of recommendation from administrators that have actually seen you teach. :)
     
  15. Suburban Gal

    Suburban Gal (formerly Elizabeth) Banned

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    That's your view based on your experience, but that doesn't mean that jillneedsajob needs to shy away from her for those exact same reasons. It may NOT have worked for you, but who's to say that it won't work for her?

    Boy do you have some wrong information! I just came from Substitute Teaching and I wasn't a FULLY CERTIFIED teacher with an Illinois certificate. Sorry, but all you need in Illinois to sub is a 4-year degree. That's all. Once I proved I had that, I got certified to sub K-12.
     
  16. Ann2006

    Ann2006 Cohort

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    :sorry: I would like to apologize to Elizabeth who pmd me that she was offended by my misinformation. She is right and I am wrong. :eek: It is substitute teachers in CPS that must be certified not all of Illinois. :sorry:
    Ironically, she has a bit of wrong information as well since Chicago is part of Illinois so it can't be all of Illinois that accepts subs without teacher certification...but I'm not offended. :sorry:
    Friends?:sorry:
     
  17. Maryhf

    Maryhf Connoisseur

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    Aug 6, 2006

    I have substituted several times during my career - out of a desire to teach! My first year out of college I was lucky enough to have parents to live with and who would pay for health insurance and I subbed almost every day. I was requested regularly by the superintendent's wife but was unable to turn it into a full time job. I did however learn something new every day in the classroom! I took a notebook along and wrote down all the great ideas I encountered. When I got a "real" job the next year I was ready with lots of tried and true methods. After years home with my kids, I subbed again and found the same thing to be true. I saw new techniques and discovered that I have a gift for middle school teaching.
    You should follow your heart. If you don't feel you're ready for full time, you should sub. You will learn a lot if your mind is open to it.
     
  18. ChristyF

    ChristyF Moderator

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    I'm sorry your experience subbing was so negative. I never looked at it as a way to get a chance to teach at that school (although that is how I got my job). I saw it as a wonderful way to get experience at different age levels. I was able to learn how I did and didn't want to do my room based on how other teachers had theirs. I was also able to learn which school(s) I didn't want to apply at because of the attitude at the school. I personally feel that subbing was an excellent way for me to get started. As a teacher, that time as a sub, also makes me appreciate what they do that much more.


     
  19. Mrs_Goatess

    Mrs_Goatess Comrade

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    Aug 7, 2006

    I'm alternatively certified.

    If I had been hired straight out of college, I would have left the field. Period.

    Subbing for the last year, short and long-term, has taught me more than anything else could have. Knowing what I know now, I know I was COMPLETELY unprepared to have my own classroom. I'm ready now.

    And, aside from your own financial situation, no one should have any say in what position you should have. As long as you're qualified to do it, it makes you happy, and you're finacially comfortable, no one should have anything to say. Do what you're comfortable with, not what your degree says you should do. (If that was true, I'd be in an entire different field!)
     

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