Does anyone oppose "Year round schools."

Discussion in 'General Education Archives' started by kocolynn, Jun 21, 2006.

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Does anyone work in a year round school? or have any ideas!!!

Poll closed Jun 23, 2006.
  1. Anyone for year round school?

    5 vote(s)
    71.4%
  2. I need advice on year ound schools?

    2 vote(s)
    28.6%
  1. MissV

    MissV Companion

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    Jun 29, 2006

    I don't like the idea of year round school for 2 reasons:

    #1: TCAPs (state tests) are in the beginning of April. You miss out on 2+ weeks of extra teaching time with year round schooling. Plus, that extra time is added on during the summertime. It's my observation that most students think that school is over after TCAPs. This year was particularly bad with 7 weeks left after TCAPs, I don't think I could have survived 9!!

    #2: I would miss out on more summertime planning if the school year were year round. For me, I LOVE regrouping and formulating new ideas during the summer. I find it particularly hard to do my planning on shorter breaks. (I typically get nothing done during the Fall, Christmas and Spring breaks).

    This summer, so far, I've pieced together an entire phonics unit:) And I STILL have time to rework my math one before school starts:):)
     
  2. MissV

    MissV Companion

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    Jun 29, 2006

    Some kids need to experience summer camp...
    and others..summer school
     
  3. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Jun 30, 2006

    Year round schools still have summer school.
     
  4. goopp

    goopp Devotee

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    In our school district, students start Aug 1 and go until May 26. That gives students 8 weeks off in the summer and teachers 6 weeks. That's plenty of time for summer "vacation", but not enough time for them to forget everything they were taught the year before.
     
  5. robin0103

    robin0103 Rookie

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    No, we come back to a new room.
    Example: We have 3 rooms for 6th grade: Room 7, 8, and 9
    We have 4 6th grade classes. (One class is always off track.)
    I start in Room 7. When I go off track, the class who is returning will get my room. When I come back on track, I will be moving into Room 8 (because they are going off track).
    This way we can have 4 classes of students even though we only have 3 rooms.
     
  6. cwp873

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    Wow! What a pain! I resent having to put everything away for the summer. I can't imagine doing it so often! I guess it is one way to deal with overcrowding though. Do they make sure that all siblings are on the same "track" so that they are off at the same time?
     
  7. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Jul 3, 2006

    This is not how our local year round schools operate. Everyone here is on the same school year still. The only difference in the year round schools here is that they start/finish on different dates than other non-year round schools, and different breaks...that is it, in a nutshell. Many teachers have to pack up their things until the next school year, but there are many who have to in non-year round schools as well, so it's not just year round schools.
     
  8. robin0103

    robin0103 Rookie

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    The district makes every effort to accomodate siblings & place them on the same track. Sometimes it doesn't work out... but most often they will be on the same schedule.
     
  9. TexasAggie2323

    TexasAggie2323 Comrade

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    I would like it but since my parents own a business that is based on tourism it would really hurt me in helping them with it. It also would pretty much make me sell it once they passed on.
    As it is right now, I can make a great supplemental income that I could not make with all the little breaks. I think this would be a problem for teacher's that needed to work during the summer to make the money that they are not making during the school year.

    I will make a pretty good salary as a first year teaching in Dallas (40k+) but there are still a lot of schools in S. Texas that start at 28k which is disappointed. I would think that those incomes would need to raise to at least 35k to make it worth it.
     
  10. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    I know the poll is probably closed by now and no one cares, but I have done a few research projects on an extended school day and year and I strongly feel that learning and education occur everywhere- in school as well as out of school. I probably learned the most valuable lessons outside of school during summer vacation. It is then that one learns to do new things, take control and have some hands on creative play, it is also a time the children are given to be themselves and learn new things and take the time out they need to grow and jump and play. Kids need to be kids- and if not during summer then when? The kids will be given other vacations, but it will not be enough. Summer is ideal with the temperature and the freedom they are given to enjoy that temperature. I have pretty extensive research done on this issue and it has not been proven to help the children or any of the other supposed benefits listed here and elsewhere. Also it is a well known fact that children must take an active role/participation/interest if learning is to occur and have a lasting impact on the student. It is crucial! In the heat of the summer months- where would you rather be- in school, or out in nature learning things you never would have learned in school. Extending the school day and year will bring about the demise of childhood. Which I (through stipulation) have defined as the early years of life during which a child explores and learns through active, self-initiated, hands on play. Childhood is a time to think, create and imagine! In the long run, all of these carefree elements of childhood prepare the child for the real world- whether it is exploring the beaches, watching birds, asking to touch all of the little children you see, or even climbing trees, all of these help us to choose our future path. Childhood is an essential part of life- it is the time during which you explore without cares or worries. It is then that one is at their simplest and arguably most joyous! Let children be children and "build sandcastles in the sky." Let them be children and imagine themselves as a rodeo clown!
     
  11. harbodin

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    Sep 1, 2006

    If each and every child had the same summer opportunities, that would be wonderful and ideal. However, where I am, the children enjoy coming to school year round, and many participate in our optional intersession (shortened day like summer school) because they just sit in front of the tv at home (if they are lucky enough to have a tv) and are actually fed 2 meals a day. Also, I am in very southern VA, bordering NC, and it is too hot to go outside and play a good portion of August anyway. Most of our children don't even understand what a vacation is. Their vacation is a trip an hour south to Greensboro.
     
  12. tm91784

    tm91784 Comrade

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    Sep 1, 2006

    I oppose year round school because everyone needs a break!! Also, the weather is too hot in the summer and schools do not have air conditioning. Students also need time off so that they can schedule a family vacation if their parents are fortunate enough to get vacation time in the summer. Kids need time to just be kids and not worry about school and homework.
     
  13. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    To each is own. Some people don't like it, others I have met really love it, including students and families. Research doesn't mean anything because every child is different and every child's needs are different. Our year round schools are pretty succesful.
     
  14. corps2005

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    I do not, nor would ever want to, work at a year-round school. My reason for this is that we plan to visit our families in Peru and other places during the summer months, and are often gone for well over a month.
     
  15. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Sep 1, 2006

    Just to reinterate, most year round schools around here get an 8 week (some 6) break for summer. I think when people think "year round" they assume they do not get a break at all. The only difference is that they get more breaks during the year as opposed to one long summer break.
     
  16. Research_Parent

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    How I wish we had something similar to the Australia model here in Phoenix, Arizona...

    The summers here are WAY TOO HOT for kids to be outside and most of the activities here have to be inside...
     
  17. nasimi77

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    I subbed a lot in Los Angeles, which is almost exclusively year-round. The consensus is, most (not all, mind you) of the teachers love it for the mini breaks, the parents don't. (again, this is just from my experiences). Many parents I've talked to prefer the consisentcy of a "traditional" calendar school-year. Another draw back is, say in LA UNIFIED, the teachers are in session for as little as 6 weeks, and then they have to pack up everything and move to another room. That can be a real pain. Many teachers prefer the traditional calendar because there isn't such a sense of "rush" all the time. A lot of teachers I talked to feel like because of their schedule, they feel like they aren't able to teach all that they are required to. I don't know that a year-round schedule is the best for the kids either. Even with "shorter breaks", the kids come back and the teachers have a shorter amount of time to re-teach what was previously learned. It can at times be a viscious cycle. So many parents and administrators saw test scores actually decline due to year round schools that now by next year ALL elementary schools will be back on traditional calendar. I guess it depends how the YR schools are implemented. There are positives and negatives to both, I think.
     
  18. ozteach

    ozteach Comrade

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    That's the only way we school here (Australia). We start at the end of January, have 10 weeks of school, 2 weeks off, 10 on, 2 off etc until nearly Christmas (summer here) when we have 6 weeks off. That makes 4 terms of school. It works really well, especially for working parents who do not have to find 14 weeks of care all at once. The two week breaks are refreshing without causing the need for revision, they allow us to teach in 'units' of about ten weeks (eg topics for history etc). And, best of all, we don't feel too bad at the end of our summer break, because we know it's only 10 weeks till the next break!:D

    I think this is a fantastic system, and always wonder about the split year that you guys have. What a long teaching session you have - our kids have had it by about the 9 week mark (especially the littlies) and really need the break.

    Many of our schools are air-conditioned (it's mandatory in some parts of the country due to extreme temperatures), and we only have snow in a VERY few areas, so that's not a problem.

    Are there many parts of the US moving to year round schooling? I wasn't aware that it existed at all over there!
     
  19. ozteach

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    I think the daycare thing works better if the whole system changes. Here we have several short breaks with a 6-7 week break over our summer (Dec/Jan). Daycare and outside-of-school-hours centres run programs over these periods, there are week-long camps available for the 2 week breaks and vacation-care programs for the longer one.

    I can see your point, though and think that it's easier to have a unified system.
     
  20. JaimeMarie

    JaimeMarie Moderator

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    For me, we start school the week before labor day, and usually after snow days don't get out until about June 20th. That gives us about 9 to 10 weeks off. I like having that time away all at once. I really don't feel refreshed after Christmas, Feb or April break, which are all one week long. Every school has a different start and end date here.
     
  21. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Very true. I'm not sure if I'd like some of the things that other year round schools have to put up with, like packing up every break or a few other things that have been talked about. Like what Robin was talking about with the tracks...I don't think I would care for that at all.
     
  22. teacher333

    teacher333 Devotee

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    How is the teacher salary figured out for a year round school? You are attending more days per year than the usual and customary
    180+ we have to work in our District. How do the parents handle child care - I would think they would be the most vocal against something like this.

    I think I would like it - less traumatic when you have to go back after a short break than a long break. The only difference is you may not feel as rejuvenated when you go back.
     
  23. nasimi77

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    Funny thing is, the year-round schools in Los Angeles were originally implemented because of the huge over-crowding issue we faced 7-9 years ago. The schools simply weren't big enough to accomodate all of the staff and students at the same time, so they had the rotating "multi-track" (A, B, C...sometimes a D track!) system. Now, that enrollment has dropped dramatically, they are going back to traditional. When I taught 1 year w/LAUSD, we had what they called "Concept 6" calendar. We taught for 4 months, had 2 months off. I must admit, that was nice. But, they are doing away with that system all-together now. It's interesting to see how so many other places and even countries (Australia!:)) are implementing year-round. I still say, as a teacher, I'm grateful for those paid holidays too, like Lincoln's b-day, and Washington, Vet's day, etc. They are the little resbits us traditional calendar teachers covet that much more! ;)
     
  24. clarnet73

    clarnet73 Moderator

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    I think i'd like it. I sometimes feel like I LIVE for those 3-day or 4-day weekends, because there's actually time to get projects done. I'd love having a week or two to relax and rejuvinate before heading back in! :)

    Teacher333, to answer your question, most that I've seen still go the same number of days, it's just that the breaks are spread out differently... so you'd get paid the same because you'd be working the same number of day.
     
  25. oldsoccerlady

    oldsoccerlady Rookie

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    Interestingly enough, my children (ages: 7, 10, 12 14) have mentioned that they would like to go to a year-round school. They think that they would prefer more frequent but shorter breaks than a long long summer break for the following reasons: they get bored by the end of the summer; it is difficult to go back to school after an extensive break; they would like to enjoy time off during all four seasons; they wouldn't get so burned-out by the end of the year.

    I used to think that year-round school was a bad idea. I've changed my mind. As a parent I get worn out too (homework help, volunteering, etc) and would appreciate more mini breaks. I also feel worn out by the end of a long summer. As an educator I might appreciate the more frequent but shorter breaks as a good time to regroup, reorganize and come come back feeling refreshed.

    Of course, I haven't actually ever tried year 'round schooling.
     
  26. Gracie

    Gracie Rookie

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    Year Round Schools

    I just started working in a year round school. I love it!! We are getting ready to "track out" and begin our three week break. It made the first quarter go by so fast seeing that vacation time in the horizon!! I don't think I would ever want to go back to a traditional calendar!
     
  27. SwOcean Gal

    SwOcean Gal Devotee

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    I see the argument that research has nothing to do with the extended school year, but it certainly does. How else is one supposed to know if this is good for our children or irrelevant to our students education? A lot of issues in education could use thorough researching to avoid stupid pitfalls education has fallen into, educators themselves should also be thoroughly researched themselves- to make sure they are intelligent, educated, reliable people in it (the field of education) for the "right" reasons. But this is a whole new topic in and of itself. Back to the issue at hand, some people do seem to love it, but I stand by my research and wholeheartedly oppose the extended school year.
     
  28. srh

    srh Devotee

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    It is important to keep in mind that YR schools ARE implemented quite differently among districts. In my area, one district has several such schools--my friend teaches at one. She LOVES having an extended break at "non-vacation" times of the year, for travel purposes. Also, students really don't "lose" everything from grade to grade the way they sometimes do with long summer breaks. That is one reason they are implemented here, along with overcrowding. It is hard on parents, for daycare reasons, but if it's the student's education that is in question, I'd say they serve a great purpose.
     
  29. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Because not all kids are alike and every child is different. I agree YR schools are not for everyone. But on the same side, traditional schools are also not right for everyone as well. That is why families also have homeschooling as an option. We should ALWAYS have options, because we are not a cookie cutter society.
     
  30. nasimi77

    nasimi77 Groupie

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    I agree, JenPooh. Let's face it, we live in a different world we grew up in. There's just a lot more options available to us now than ever before. As mentioned, homeschooling, multi-track YR schools, private schools, and now, even e-learining environments.
     
  31. srh

    srh Devotee

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    I meant to add that in the schools around here, the majority of teachers do NOT have to pack up and leave every session. There are usually one or two teachers who do so each year (they rotate), but it mostly depends on the facilities and how many classrooms are available at any given time. With four tracks running throughout the year, there is a lot of overlap, but it takes some good management skills to figure out the most logical (least intrusive) method of implementation!
     
  32. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    I am waiting on a teaching job. We have two schools that are year-round. I think I would like teaching a a year-round school.

    I have been a student in year-round school. When I was in third and fourth grade my elementary school followed that scheduling. We had 5 track schedule. I was on track C and had the regular winter holiday plus an extra month off in the winter. This was nice. I don't remember my teacher yelling or us kids being as anxious as traditional scedule. However, I think the way year-round was done at my school might be hard on teachers. We were very over crowded and teachers had different rooms when returning from break--that would be highly stressful. But I think if it isn't multi-track or teachers at least didn't have to change rooms it would be great!
     
  33. corps2005

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    Hmmm, if that's the case, then I wouldn't mind it. So I would still have a good summer break, and several breaks throughout the year? That would be great then. The breaks rejuvenate me, much like this Labor Day break :p

    We have few breaks here. I wouldn't mind at least 1 3-day weekend a month or something like that. It kind of eases the mind.
     
  34. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Exactly!!!:D Christmas, Easter, and an October break of 3 weeks each around here. Then a 6 week summer break, or 8. I think most are 6, now that I recall. But like Nasimi said, it also depends on how the school is ran. Just like in traditional schools, year round schools can all be ran differently as well.
     
  35. nasimi77

    nasimi77 Groupie

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    Yeah, I'm used to the "track system" in YR schools. The coveted track is what we know as "A Track". It's most similar to a traditional calendar. You start in late Aug/early Sept...work until Christmas break. Then, you get Jan/Feb off! You go back and work Mar-June...off Jul/Aug. However, that is just "A Track". B & C track criss-cross each other during the summer months. I think B-track begins July 5th! Imagine that with no A/C! (I've heard of it more than once). Now...of course to add to the confusion, they have a new year-round calendar. Instead of working 4 months and having 2 off, I think now it's more like work 3 months and have 1 off? (I'm not sure...not subbing w/them anymore). Anyhow, all that to say....YR WITHOUT a crazy track system seems to be the ideal situation, if you can get it. ;)
     
  36. Kat53

    Kat53 Devotee

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    Sep 5, 2006

    First, to clear up the misconception about year round schools-it is not any longer than a traditional school. It is that the breaks are broken up throughout the year, so instead of having a long summer, your have a shorter summer and longer fall and spring breaks. Our summer in our year round school is seven weeks, which is still a pretty long time. Almost two months.
     
  37. JenPooh

    JenPooh Virtuoso

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    Thank you Kat! I think there are many misinterpretations about them.
     
  38. 2Teach_is_2Care

    2Teach_is_2Care Rookie

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    Shadow,
    I definately agree! Last year was my first year teaching, and after my first week off, i was ready to go back!! I like the idea of 9 weeks on 2-3 weeks off with one of those weeks for remediation. But many of the teachers I work with LOVE their long summers (mainly the older teachers, no offense to those who fall under that category!). But I also don't have any kids of my own, so I'm not sure how I would feel if I did... But for now I wish I was teaching at a year round school!
     
  39. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    nasimi77, I remember my mom asking which track we wanted. My sister and I chose C, because of the extened winter break. I liked it because of the schedule near the end of the year. The kids my mom took care of were on A track. So it was crazy. 5 kids. 2 tracks. I liked the multi track, in a way, because the school was less crowded. I had time to get my lunch and play. The school was still crowded, but not near as much as before.
     
  40. Gracie

    Gracie Rookie

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    Sep 7, 2006

    Year Round

    One of the downfalls to year round, at least at my school, we have to switch classrooms each time we track back in. Because the 4 tracks rotate, that means packing up everything. We are given two large closets on wheels. So every nine weeks I am taking down my classroom. You just learn to keep only essentials.
     

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