Does Anyone Know about the GT (Gifted & Talented) Program? What type of Art?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by TeacherSandra, Jul 20, 2009.

  1. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    One of my former students who is extrememly SMART did NOT get into the program...her "art" portfolio just wasn't up-to-par.
    Another one of my former students got in...I had mentioned to his mom that she needs to include some of his art work.
    I guess I should be asking her what she included, but I don't keep in touch with parents until I see them again and if I see them again in the Fall.

    so, what are the GT coordinators looking for?
     
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  3. Ms.Jasztal

    Ms.Jasztal Maven

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    Specific standards are set in a variety of areas. The advanced class I have accomodates those students who are Gifted (and aren't enrolled in the program, as they decide to be in my regular ed. class) as well as those who are on the brink of Gifted. I appreciate having classes like mine because sometimes some of the most well-rounded, bright students aren't accepted into the Gifted program.
     
  4. WannaTeach

    WannaTeach Companion

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    Gifted and Talented

    Each school system should have/may have an administrator who is in charge of the Gifted and Talented program. In my schools, what we refer to as Academically and Intellectually Gifted, (AG or AIG), students must meet 4 criteria to be considered AG. However, we look at reading and math grades, extracurricular activities and civic responsibility. Also, students are recommended by their teachers starting in 3rd grade. From this point on, students will attend higher level classes. All of this is for the student who just need more stimulation and higher thinking skills. For example, in elementary and middle school students are AG or AIG, in high school, students are in humanities and AP classes. I have had the opportunity to be asked by my principal to choose whom in my kindergarten class :eek: would be considered a possible future AG student. Of course, she was going on reading scores (running records) for this. Sorry, this is confusing. If your system has an AG administrator they should have the information. Also, in our system our EC or Exceptional Children's program includes students with special needs for disabilities and students who are AIG. None of the criteria focused on artistic abilities.
     
  5. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    I'm from a private school and these kids are entering a public school...1st grade. Both are very bright kids...extremely. So, I was pretty surprised that one made it into the program and the other did not. I've been told that much hinges on artistic ability.
     
  6. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    They may be using art as an indicator, but artistic ability is only one of dozens of attributes that can indicate giftedness.

    Asking what makes someone gifted is as difficult as trying to state what makes a person extraordinary. We all have many ideas of what that would be, and sometimes we might not even think of the possibilities until we are confronted with them.

    The thing I always tell parents is that smart is not the same as gifted. You can be very, very smart and not be gifted. You can be very artisitic and not be gifted. Bright is not the same as gifted. Many bright people are not gifted. Being gifted is not the same thing as bright. There are many gifted people who make choices that show they are not terribly bright.

    Students who perform well academically often are what we classify as "high achievers." High achievers are not typically gifted. High achievers are people pleasers by nature -- a wonderful attribute. They do what is required of them without complaint. They follow the rubric to a T. They do more than what is expected in order to please you as a teacher. They want to be helpful. These are wonderful students to have in your class.

    Gifted students may also be people pleasers, but many aren't. Gifted students may follow the rubric to a T, but often they don't. They would prefer to come up with their own rubric, or have finished the entire activity in their heads before you even present them with the rubric. Gifted students aren't so worried about your high expectations -- they have their own goals and expectations -- which are far more important to them.

    Gifted students often become highly frustrated with challenges in areas that do not highly interest them. They also become very frustrated with the mundane or repetitive. Gifted students can be argumentative -- though many aren't. Gifted students may lack social skills that would make their lives so much easier -- although others are very socially adept. Gifted students often have learning styles and mannerisms that are very annoying to many teachers (such as questioning the teacher, contradicting her, refusing to follow directions or comply, etc.) Even the most pleasant ones at some point in their education will come to the shocking realization that they may know more than the teacher who is teaching them -- some are just nicer about it.

    There is a marked difference between intelligence and giftedness. An intelligent person excels in education and knows the answers to questions, compared with a gifted person, who instead asks the questions. An intelligent person has great ideas, whereas a gifted person has crazy, wild ideas. An intelligent person is very alert, and a gifted person is sharply observant. An intelligent person learns easily, and a gifted person already knows based on his or her intuition.

    Giftedness is an inborn trait that can be recognized in early childhood. Apart from obvious indications of giftedness, as in a musical prodigy, a gifted child may also comprehend abstract concepts at an early age; enjoy collecting peculiar things, such as rocks, insects and bottle caps; be intensely curious and attentive to detail; make connections between seemingly obscure things; experiment and exhibit high creativity. Gifted children also tend to prefer older companions, question authority and seem mature for their age. These characteristics are only some of the traits that may signify giftedness.

    Now, I love working with gifted students. I like teaching them even with all their quirky ways. I think a big part of this is that I am the younger sibling of a child prodigy, and while I have been classified as gifted myself, I could never compare to my incredibly gifted sibling.

    Giftedness isn't just about being smart, or bright, or intelligent. It is so much more complex than that.
     
  7. fuzed_fizzion

    fuzed_fizzion Comrade

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    Our state refers to the gifted program as Talented & Gifted. The only way for students to be labeled officially as TAG is have a certain achievement level on an administered national test. I have been pushing and pushing to develop a portfolio option because not all kids are TAG in math and reading.
     
  8. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    :eek: Thank you Rainstorm!!! You hit it on the head...as you were explaining...I could see why my one student was accepted into the GT program and why the other was not! oh my gosh...my "gifted" student was a toot in class...marching to the beat of a different drummer...HE is the gifted one! The other was an excellent student who followed things to a T. both beautiful children with 2 distinct "abilities".
    WOW.
    I never quite understood the difference, til now.
    Thank you!
     
  9. RainStorm

    RainStorm Phenom

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    I'm glad I could help. I have this discussion with more parents than you can imagine -- the parents who are so sure their child is "gifted" when they aren't. They are so disappointed when their child is not accepted into the gifted program. We have a similar discussion, and if I'm succuessful, they come away from that meeting realizing just how special their high achieving student is -- and how much easier it is to be the parent of a high achiever rather than a gifted student.
     
  10. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    It's so funny to me how it varies from state to state. Here if you are in Kinder and applying it's based strictly on paper-and-pencil standardized test scores-a spatial ability test and the Stanford which is a pretty comprehensive content test.

    A 4-year old is also tested with a multi-subject test but it's given orally. I guess our programs are strictly gifted - they don't account for any kind of art ability when they are that young. It's interesting to hear how other places do it.
     
  11. TeacherSandra

    TeacherSandra Enthusiast

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    Just printed and will file your letter, Rainstorm.
    Thank you again! :)
     
  12. yarnwoman

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    Rainstorm - your previous post with the explanation was wonderful. And this one is great also. As the parent of two gifted children, I often wish they were just high achievers. Why? Because then life would be easier or so I tell myself. Would I change it? Not on your life. That's why it takes a special teacher to teach these kids.
     
  13. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    California is easy. If you score in the top 10% of IQ tests in your district you are gifted (or it might be if you're 10% over the average IQ score but I'm pretty sure it is the former). That means gifted in Riverside may not be gifted in Orange County.

    Art isn't even a factor.
     
  14. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    How true! We moved while we were military up and down the CA coastline. The kids were Gifted in San Diego, Not gifted in Monterey(had to retest), Gifted Again in San Diego.

    When we moved back to San Diego I did not request testing again. Then I was approached by their middle school teachers to have them tested. The only way they could be placed into the higher level (honors) classes was to be classified as gifted. So I gave in and allowed for retesting. They qualified. I was excited when they reached high school as most schools no longer have seperate classes for gifted kids. You have a choice at most schools between regular, honors(advanced) or AP classes. This has made a big difference with my teens.
     
  15. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    I forgot to say that San Diego uses the Raven test but Monterey uses a mixture of the Raven, your state test scores, your grades and teacher evals to qualify you for gate.
    In Monterey you get scores for each component and then they add those scores up and you have to have a certain number to qualify.
     
  16. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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  17. yarnwoman

    yarnwoman Cohort

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    Teacher - thanks for sharing this. I was given this article when my oldest was in kindergarten. Her Kinder teacher told me in Oct. at parent teacher conferences that my darling daughter was an a type personality. She was headstrong, independent and would never need someone to put a boot on her backside to make her work. She also said go home and read this as you will need it. This was a kinder teacher who had just been reassigned from 5th grade. This teacher had both of my kids and I love her dearly for how she allowed them to think outside the box and really fostered their growth, both emotionally and educationally.

    Thanks again for sharing.
     
  18. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Your daughters (and you) might enjoy Tolan's novel Welcome to the Ark.
     
  19. moonbeamsinajar

    moonbeamsinajar Habitué

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    In this district, a child has to be referred for testing by a teacher. Then they are given an IQ test, and only are allowed into the program if they score above 130. One of my daughters made the program, and the other did not. Our program was basically lots of busy work...writing reports, and doing research on assigned topics. Then they have all the work that they missed in the regular classroom to complete besides! The only thing my daughter enjoyed about it was getting out of the regular classroom once a week, and going to a class with 3 students and one teacher. She did opt out at the high school level, and did a dual enrollment at the local university instead of the district gifted program. Also lots of work, but she entered college with 12 college credits already completed.
     
  20. TeacherGroupie

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    My sympathies to your daughter, moonbeamsinajar...
     
  21. moonbeamsinajar

    moonbeamsinajar Habitué

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    A gifted program could be a wonder experience for a child but my daughter's experience was not impressive. Although the teacher was nice, and very caring, with only 2 or 3 students, it could have been a fantastic thing. The tip off for me should have been the IEP they developed for her. They had a check list of 20 or so things that they could use as goals, and just put an x beside 3 of them, then we signed at the bottom. And having seen the work and planning and evaluation that we do in Head Start for our children with IEP's , I was really shocked.
    But it all worked out okay in the end - she did get great experience writing research papers, and it helped her in her other classes.
     

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