does a masters drgree make a difference?

Discussion in 'Montessori' started by artgirl, Oct 17, 2009.

  1. artgirl

    artgirl New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 1, 2009
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 17, 2009

    I've noticed that amongst the training programs in my area, Maryland, some places are affiliated with universities and others are not. The ones affiliated with universities offer credit towards a master in teaching or education when you get you montessori certification. I'm wondering if that masters degree makes a difference when it comes to finding jobs. The training center that is closest to me is not affiliated with anyone but the AMS and I wonder if that really matters.
    thanks!
     
  2.  
  3. Rebel1

    Rebel1 Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    1,522
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 17, 2009

    Of course!
    Anything higher in EDUCATION makes a difference.:)
    Rebel1
     
  4. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    1

    Oct 18, 2009

    I think it depends. If you envision yourself wanting to teach in a public Montessori setting, then you should go with the masters program. More than likely you'll also be State Certified when you graduate. The program that's only affiliated with AMS will only enable you to teach in private Montessori schools.

    I have my masters in Montessori and my State Certification. Getting that extra piece of paper with the degree on it made all of the difference in my finding a job in a good school and the ability to make a higher salary.

    Look at both programs....ask them what their graduates are doing and where they're working. Ask yourself if those are the kinds of programs where you'd like to work, and take it from there.
     
  5. Yenna

    Yenna Companion

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2006
    Messages:
    123
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 26, 2009

    You have the Loyola Montessori Center in Baltimore, this is the AMI course with the Master's Option.
    The Master's not only deepens your knowledge in more general Educational theories and practice but puts you up a couple notches on the pay scale!
    Good Luck!
     
  6. Pattypoo

    Pattypoo Comrade

    Joined:
    Sep 5, 2004
    Messages:
    286
    Likes Received:
    0

    Oct 27, 2009

    Depends on the school. At my school a Master's will up you only $500 more per year. I personally don't think it is worth it. Especially when you consider the cost of obtaining the Master's. A public school is a much better option.
     
  7. Flora

    Flora New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2009
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 22, 2009

    Master's makes no difference

    A Master's (which I have) makes a difference only if you will be working in a public montessori school. They are still rare, and many do not provide the same quality of teaching life as private schools do- although the salary is high.
    I live in a city where there are no montessori public schools, so I am obliged to go with the private ones- and the private ones love to see that you have a master's on your resume, because they can show it off to parents- but you will not be paid any extra for it. If you do, it will be a minimal difference and not worth the money or time you put into a Master's. I have worked 5 years as a teacher, and my salary has not changed at all. This is why I am having to open my own school- to determine myself what my salary should and will be.
    There is a high, high demand for montessori teachers- the AMI or AMS diploma is enough to find a job virutally anywhere- masters or no masters.
     
  8. mtiroly

    mtiroly Rookie

    Joined:
    Nov 25, 2009
    Messages:
    21
    Likes Received:
    0

    Dec 23, 2009

    Flora,
    From your experience, is the demand high in some areas (geographically speaking) more so than others? And would you say that it is highest for a certain level, Primary/Children's House for example, more so than elementary?
    Can I ask what area of the country you are in?
     
  9. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2008
    Messages:
    1,927
    Likes Received:
    1

    Dec 24, 2009

    Around here, we have a training program, so demand is high, but the supply of trained Montessorians is also high. Demand is highest for 9-12 and 12-15 age groups and it seems teachers at that age level are always able to find jobs around here.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. jaimebradley,
  2. Ima Teacher,
  3. MissCeliaB
Total: 332 (members: 4, guests: 306, robots: 22)
test