Does a MA degree always count towards salary scale?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by frtrd, May 29, 2014.

  1. frtrd

    frtrd Rookie

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    May 29, 2014

    I'm in a Masters of Ed program right now to get my teacher certification. I enrolled in a MA program because my BA degree was not in Education, and I needed a way to get my certificate.

    Today I saw something on Reddit saying that teachers who got their MA degree BEFORE beginning to teach would not be compensated accordingly -- they would be paid as if they only had a BA degree. (Only teachers who got their Masters AFTER beginning to teach would have it "counted".)

    So ... Is this true??? And if so, how would I ever move up to the MA-level salary lane?? Because there is no way I would go back to get a SECOND Masters degree ... !
     
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  3. Pi-R-Squared

    Pi-R-Squared Groupie

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    May 29, 2014

    I got my MA degree in the Spring of 2013. I began my teaching career in the Fall 2013 and was paid according to the MA salary scale. :D
     
  4. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    May 29, 2014

    I've never heard of such a thing. Some districts pay one-time bonuses to teachers based on continuing education while teachers but that shouldn't have anything to do with the scale.
     
  5. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    I suppose it's possible, but in general, as long as your master's is related to your job title, you'll get put on the master's salary scale.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    May 29, 2014

    Can you post a link to the thing on Reddit?

    Teacher salaries vary by district. It's possible that a particular district would institute this type of policy, but I have never heard of that happening. In my district, you are compensated as long as your credits/degree are related to Education and/or your content area.

    If you have an idea about where you might want to work, check out their salary schedules and see what they say.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    May 29, 2014

    What step you start on is somewhat negotiable/ at the Supe's discretion when you are hired....you aren't going to get paid for Bachelors however if you have a Masters.
     
  8. TnKinder

    TnKinder Companion

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    It really depends on your district. In mine teachers who already held a masters is paid on that scale, but those who did not had to be enrolled in a program and done by this June to get it. Now if I go on to get a EDS I won't be paid on that scale. The rational is that research shows no correlation between higher degrees and advanced degrees.
     
  9. frtrd

    frtrd Rookie

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    May 30, 2014

    Sure! I don't know if links work on here, though, but I'll try --

    http://www.reddit.com/r/Teachers/co...ou_wish_youd_known_before_beginning_a/chu57hp

    It's just one person saying it, though.
     
  10. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    I actually wanted to get an M.A. in either Autism or School Counseling. However, the only 2 obstacles are one, that I don't know if they would pay me more as a teacher if I decided not to go into either of those careers, and two, a clinical practicum being required would often make it difficult to work around as a teacher.
     
  11. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    This can vary widely. The entire state of North Carolina does not pay for any Masters Degree.

    In your situation, you don't have 2 degrees in education, so I would not be surprised if some districts didn't pay you for a masters degree. The masters would be in lieu of the typical bachelors degree in education.
     
  12. Darkhorse

    Darkhorse Companion

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    May 30, 2014

    In my district people who are hired with a masters degree start on step one whereas people who are hired with a bachelors start on step two. That means that if you get your masters before being hired you are a step lower than people that get a masters after they get hired.
     
  13. SF_Giants66

    SF_Giants66 Cohort

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    May 30, 2014

    I think they do this so they don't have to pay for a graduate degree without relevant experience with the school system.

    I prefer the way some districts do it where graduate credits only pay slightly more for the first few years then start to get around 2k-3k more after about 5 years.
     

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