Do your students ask who you are voting for? If so, do you tell them?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by greendream, Oct 19, 2012.

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  1. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    Oct 19, 2012

    I've always been rather torn about this. What do you think?
     
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  3. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Oct 19, 2012

    My students have, on occasion, asked. I absolutely do NOT tell. I don't want to have the appearance of politically influencing students. Also, I don't want them to see me differently if they disagree with my opinions (which is often the case). My ballot is secret, my lawn has no signage, and my opinions are not up for discussion in a public forum.
     
  4. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Well I work in CR so they really don't care too much. But I did have a USA native ask me if I voted for Obama or ''the other guy'' in the last election. I told her Obama. She was shocked and says ''but why?'' I simply told her ''I agree with what he agrees with'' then moved on.

    I don't mind telling kids, but I do remember that none of my teachers in high school would ever tell me who they voted for.
     
  5. hbcaligirl1985

    hbcaligirl1985 Cohort

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    Abdolutely not. It is not their business.
     
  6. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 19, 2012

    Many of my students have asked me. My response is that I'm voting for the person who I believe will do the best job and whose views most closely match my own.
     
  7. MissCeliaB

    MissCeliaB Aficionado

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    We have a district policy and are not allowed to share our political leanings with our students.

    But most of mine can figure it out.
     
  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I don't tell my family who I'm voting for (although they often know which one of several candidates I'm not supporting), so I certainly wouldn't tell my students. My response is similar to Caesar's.
     
  9. physteach

    physteach Companion

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    Oct 19, 2012

    I do the same. The only thing that gets me is when they try to then figure out what my views are. Yesterday, they asked me about whether I believe marijuana should be legalized :eek:hmy: It ended up turning into a discussion about addiction and what the role of the government is (eg. we legislate alcohol, cigarette use as well). I also got a chance to explain to them why although marijuana isn't on the same level as harder drugs, there are negative consequences.
     
  10. TamaraF

    TamaraF Companion

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    Oct 19, 2012

    Never. I don't tell my co-workers, either. Politics do not belong in a workplace.
     
  11. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    This is a good answer. It is also our right as a citizen not to have to share who we are voting for that's why we have ballot booths.
     
  12. Ms. I

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    Oct 19, 2012

    Thank God no students nor any coworkers ever asked & I don't believe they will, so I don't have to worry about it. I'm not that chummy with any coworkers & the few that I am wouldn't ask me.
     
  13. Bella2010

    Bella2010 Habitué

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    Oct 19, 2012

    We have a mock election at my building, so the question gets asked quite a bit. I just tell the kids I'm choosing the person who I most agree with and that it's a secret between me and the voting booth, lol. We visit about politics at work, not like serious debates or anything like that, more like flippant conversations, lol. Only one teacher gets bent out of shape about conversations, mostly because she's in the minority, so we just don't do it when she's around.

    Beth
     
  14. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 19, 2012

    THey don't ask.

    But if they did, I would talk to them about the wonderful fact that in this country, our vote is a private matter; we don't have to tell ANYONE else who we chose to vote for.
     
  15. Myrisophilist

    Myrisophilist Habitué

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    I haven't been asked, but I have talked about the presidential debates with one of my students who is clearly pro-Obama (like me) and she knows my thoughts on some issues. I don't feel particularly protective of whether people know who I choose to vote for. If I was a social studies teacher, I would be careful not to pick one side or the other, but I don't feel any particular obligation to remain non-partisan in science. With that said, I'm definitely not broadcasting my views.
     
  16. Jerseygirlteach

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    I try to be very careful to keep it neutral when we talk about the election even though I am have passionate opinions. They are very impressionable and it is not my place to influence their political leanings. I have been asked, though. I tell them that my choice is private.
     
  17. K1teach

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    Oct 19, 2012

    This is what I tell my kids if they ask. But I work in an elementary so it isn't a huge issue with the kiddos. I don't discuss politics with anyone but my husband. And the only sign ever in my yard is pro school levy. Since I teach in the district I live in I feel strongly about the levies.
     
  18. JustMe

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    Oct 19, 2012

    In middle school, yes. I told them their parents might not appreciate it if I told them—because that's the truth...I'm not personally bothered by sharing who I support.

    During the last election I taught a fun persuasive unit during which I clearly over did it in terms of not revealing who I supported through subtle word choices and so forth because they all thought I was voting for McCain (despite my Obama vote).
     
  19. Lisabobisa

    Lisabobisa Comrade

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    I won't even tell my mother who I'm voting for, much less my students.
     
  20. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Oct 19, 2012

    Mine are constantly asking and trying to "convince" me to vote for one of the candidates- being that they're third graders, the "convincing" is usually hilarious! I tell them that voting is secret and they shouldn't ask people who they're voting for.
     
  21. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Virtuoso

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    Oct 19, 2012

    Mine have been asking if I've been watching the debates. They were very interested in the vice-presidential debate in Danville since we are close to there.

    I don't share my political or religious views with students.
     
  22. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Oct 19, 2012

    A tad bit off topic but I just voted via absentee ballot for the first time this year and there was something that bothered me.

    My state required me to put my name and address on the envelope. I also had to include my voter ID number and the fact that there is an absentee ballot enclosed in the envelope. Personally I thought the voter ID was enough. I also think they need a postal code or something relating to it being an absentee ballot instead of writing it so obviously on the front.
     
  23. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    Oct 19, 2012

    My kids have been asking me what political party I belong to and who I'm voting for. I tell them I don't have a party (I'm NPA), and I haven't decided who to vote for yet. All true statements.

    (Now after the election... I suppose I'll just say it doesn't matter, since it's over and done with.)
     
  24. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    I don't tell them who I vote for. I do wear my "I voted today" sticker to make a statement that I vote, and I believe voting is important. I strongly believe that every citizen should vote, and I do advocate that. Remember that Adolph Hitler became the Nazi party leader by one vote. Voting can make a difference.
     
  25. Accountable

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    I teach US Gov't to seniors, so of course the issue comes up. I treat it exactly as I treat academic questions. I turn it back on them. I ask who they think I vote for, then why. As they bring up a point about the candidates I ask if they agree with that point or not, then why ... on and on until I guide it back to the lesson.

    If a student is insistent (and it happens fairly often, because they're onto my tricks) then I remind her (it's always a her) that I never really answer a question, but help her to figure it for herself. And I'm not about to change that now. :D
     
  26. Accountable

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    Absolutely! I keep voter registration cards handy and always make a point of giving it to every 18-year-old. Sometimes they tell me they're not legal. I treat it as a joke and tell them the politicians don't mind.
     
  27. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    This isn't true.

    From http://www.snopes.com/history/govern/onevote.asp :

    Adolph Hitler resigned from the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP) in July 1921. He allowed himself to be coaxed into rejoining shortly afterwards with the demand that he be given "the post of chairman with dictatorial power." The party membership soon voted 553 to 1 in favor of taking Hitler back on his terms. How anyone could claim this was a "one vote" election is mystifying.
     
  28. Ilovesummer

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    I do get asked. This year I was asked during the first week of school! My 2nd graders don't realize that it's a private and personal matter, so I take that opportunity to tell them that it's not polite to ask someone who they're voting for, and that because it is private, their parents might not appreciate them telling everyone at school who they're voting for either.
     
  29. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Adolph Hitler resigned from the National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP) in July 1921. He allowed himself to be coaxed into rejoining shortly afterwards with the demand that he be given "the post of chairman with dictatorial power." The party membership soon voted 553 to 1 in favor of taking Hitler back on his terms. How anyone could claim this was a "one vote" election is mystifying.

    Caesar, While my source does say 1 vote. I did go to the website you said and checked a few more. While there are many sources that say Hitler won by 1 vote, it does appear that the better web-sites agree with you on 553-1. I therefore stand corrected. Thanks...always like to learn a little more history.
     
  30. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    What's your source?
     
  31. dr.gator

    dr.gator Comrade

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    I don't share my vote with ANYONE! Never have, never will. That's a decision between me, my God, and the pen I use to vote with in the voting booth. I actually answered a phone call from a group conducting an opinion poll. The lady asked who I was voting for and I responded informing her that I don't participate in polls where I have to reveal my vote simply because it is my choice and I was the only one who needed to know it. She actually thanked me for my honest answer before we hung up. Most try to persuade me to participate.
     
  32. Special-t

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    They do ask and I don't tell.
     
  33. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    I'm curious how everyone would answer if the students asked you your prediction as to who will win. I'm starting an election unit with my class on Monday and on the last day before Election Day I wanted to have us vote by secret ballots and make predictions. I plan on giving my prediction (on the hope that they'll be interested to see which of us are correct) but telling them that my prediction does not indicate my preference. Actually, in this case, my prediction is the opposite of my preference! I won't tell them that, though.
     
  34. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Are they basing their prediction on anything...or just guessing? If it's the latter, I'm afraid students won't understand that YOU, being a more informed and educated adult, are basing your prediction on things they won't really understand...and they'll just assume, no matter what you say, your prediction is who you hope to win.
     
  35. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    I sent in my absentee ballot via email and one of the things I have to sign is a waiver to privacy. Because obviously at least one person is going to have to read my name and mark my votes. I honestly don't care. I'm just happy they made the process so simple and that I can get my vote counted!
     
  36. Jerseygirlteach

    Jerseygirlteach Groupie

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    They'd just be guessing. My students are in 4th grade and, developmentally, on a K-1 level. They're not in a position to take into account polling and other factors.

    Sigh. Maybe I'll leave out the predictions and just stick to our secret ballot.
     
  37. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    I don't think it's a good idea to share that with students.
     
  38. pete2770

    pete2770 Comrade

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    I never would. For one, I swing between left and right more often than a pendulum based on the candidates, and secondly, the "best" that can come of it is having half the class subtly dislike your views (and possibly you) and the other half thinking it's neat you agree with them. Not a good trade-off.

    Among friends I'm more of a chameleon. My liberal friends think I lean with them, and my conservative friends think I lean with them. It's a delicate balance, but I find it keeps me friendly in all cliques. :)
     
  39. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Depends on the age. With high school or upper grade middle school students, they can look at the polls and see--there are many good sites. Also, it can get into discussions of biased and unbiased polls. Some polls are run by groups that tend to vote Republican or Democrat. These are often considered biased and might be less scientific. There are professionally run polls that are run by groups that use excellent sources of sampling and pride themselves on making the best predictions.

    For younger students, I think the polls can take a bit of the fun out of it. They might like to guess themselves without looking at polls.
     
  40. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    Caesar753
    Guru

    What's your source?


    ABC News. Not sure why that is important, as I said after researching this, it is clear that Hitler won 553-1.
     
  41. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Can anyone explain why people tend to be so guarded over who they are voting for? (To sociology/history buffs) I'm curious whether it is a practice that came about during a particular time period... e.g. During colonial days, were people just as guarded? If not, did something happen that caused a shift (that prevails all the way to today)? I genuinely wonder about this, because I just don't get why people shy away from stating who they're voting for, when everyone is so full of opinions in everything else.

    As a teacher, it would seem to be a golden opportunity to teach (respect for other's views, teach politics, discuss current issues).
     
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