do you use the reading series provided?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by New2NC, Mar 13, 2008.

  1. New2NC

    New2NC Rookie

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    Mar 13, 2008

    So after transferring to a new school, I'm at a loss for what to use to teach reading. Even though the same series (HM) is used and that's what I used three years prior, I'm finding that it isn't relevant or even 50% useful in my 1st grade class now. These kids are amazing readers, and HM is actually way too easy. What else can I do to still feel as though I'm prepared for lessons without sitting online every night trying to come up with something new, or a quick trip to the library before the bell rings?:help:
     
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  3. cheer

    cheer Comrade

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    Mar 13, 2008

    We use the same series and I have run into the same problem. We also use AR (accelerated reader)and that has helped individualze each childs level. My class struggles with main idea and details to support the main idea so those lessons we do together with a book from the llibrary. I will keep my eye on this post so I can get ideas too.
     
  4. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Mar 13, 2008

    Maybe devote more time to readers workshop. Give each child a ziplock for a book bag, and do independent reading time, while you conference with kids. This way they can read at their level. If there is a child who needs more support, read with them more often. I keep a binder where I keep my records. If you have AR you could do that as well. Model and teach strategies with picture books. Then when they are reading their books, at the end regroup with the class and discuss how they used that strategy that day. Sometimes do a lesson in which they respond to their reading in writing, drawing, etc.
     
  5. New2NC

    New2NC Rookie

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    Mar 14, 2008

    Thanks for the help. So, the only whole group instruction for reading should be shared reading with something short. When they disperse to do independent reading, they are rushing through their stories and I'm pretty sure they're not comprehending completely. I think my biggest challenge is finding enough books for them on their levels and keeping all of that organized as well. We have a leveled book room, but maybe because I'm new I am a little overwhelmed and lost. I used to have to teach a lot more word work than I have to now, and I think I'm struggling with what to teach during guided reading. Is this just spring confusion???
     
  6. bonneb

    bonneb Fanatic

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    Mar 14, 2008

    What about teaching sight words, and doing leveled spelling lists? This is a way to challenge them.

    I have an entire section of my room that is leveled books, and they are each assigned a level. They move up about every week or 2. But this is kinda a long term project.

    Start by putting out a notice that your class is doing a used book drive, and see what you get. Then you can level those books, use the zip bag idea, and have everyone at their own level.

    When I started at this school, the reading program was a mess. There were teacher's manuals but no corresponding books for the kids! I don't know how the teacher before me taught reading.
     
  7. mrsmoore

    mrsmoore Rookie

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    Mar 14, 2008

    We have the same reading series and it is not challenging enough for my third graders! I use Reading A-Z books quite a bit. I print off the books and run copies for my kids. It is a great addition and they have great materials.
     
  8. Tasha

    Tasha Phenom

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    Mar 14, 2008

    You need to find a routine that works that you can more or less stick to every week. Is it all of language arts or specifically reading that is throwing you off? There are so many possibilities in this that I don't know where to start :lol: Is there a specific amount of time you are spending on certain aspects of language arts? Could you do quick mini-lessons with the group and send them to work at work stations wile you meet with small groups so that you can help groups apply the skill at different levels with books from the book room? You can also have them fill out reading response sheets for their stories to start holding them accountable for comprehending the stories.
     
  9. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Mar 14, 2008

    Another thing you can do is put two kids who are on similar levels together to partner read the same book.

    Establish a clear routine, like "I read a page, you read a page" then each child reads the whole thing to the other kid. By the time they get through the book 3 times they should have good fluency and comprehension. For shorter books this will still probably take 2-3 days depending on how long they are reading. If you happen to have kids in chapter books, you will have to work with them on doing something different, and each child will probably need a copy of their own. In this case, I would have them complete a little project for each chapter... but I don't know how many you have in chapter books. In some schools this is common, in others it is not.

    Have them read the book together, and try to make your way around the room to each group and meet with them briefly. Have them work together to fill in a graphic organizer for each book that covers sequence, character or something. HM online should have good graphic organizers to print out for this. For each book they can create a drawing and label the parts, or write the title and copy a favorite part of the book onto the picture if they aren't really writing independently yet.

    At the end of reading each day, choose two or three groups to share their books. When they have shared a book, it can go in a special basket so that anyone who wants to can read that book, even if it's not exactly on their level during some other time. They will probably want to read the books their peers are reading!

    I have small classes, so this has worked for me in the past, but I also teach older kids so they are more independent. I'm curious to see how this problem is resolved. It probably does feel good to have such a great group of readers though!
     
  10. old-new teacher

    old-new teacher Comrade

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    Mar 15, 2008

    We use HM too and I find it tedious to use! I do use the leveled readers in a guided reading format. I have started using the "Daily 5" format in my room this year, so it makes the basal reader format too cumbersome to use! I do use the lessons in the teacher's manual to create mini lessons for whole group instruction before they break into their independent reading/writing/word work times. If you've never read the book(The Daily 5), I highly recommend it. My kids are reading so well and they love it too!
     
  11. i am mr. b

    i am mr. b Rookie

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    Mar 16, 2008

    YES! I agree with old-new-teacher. Two books I would suggest are "The Daily Five" (which will help you structure your literacy block easily without using a basil) and Debbie Miller's "Reading with Meaning" (it has loads of good ideas for teaching focused mini-lessons on strategies AND lots of resource lists for what to use).

    Good luck, friend!
     

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