Do you take recess for missed homework?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by Em_Catz, Apr 13, 2013.

  1. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Apr 13, 2013

    My current school's policy is that we are no longer allowed to take recess just because a child did not do their homework.

    Prior to this policy, many teachers would make the child do their homework during recess time at a back table if we had indoor, or outside on the playground with a clipboard if there was outdoor recess.

    Last year we had a student who was extremely bright but refused to work. Instead he spent his time terrorizing other children, trying to sneak out of the classroom, going on multiple bathroom breaks, playing with crayons and pencils, drawing in his notebook, etc.

    A few times, his teacher would have him outside with a clipboard doing his classwork.

    How do you all feel about this?

    Personally, I am on the fence. On the one hand, I understand that a child needs to learn responsibility and a good work ethic.

    However, children also need to run around, expend energy and learn social skills.

    I'm hopeful that I may be getting a job at a new school and if they do not have this policy, I need to decide if I will or won't do it.
     
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  3. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

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    Apr 13, 2013

    My kids have a 15 minute recess before lunch and a 15 minute recess mid-afternoon. I always give them the lunch recess (partly for selfish reasons- if they had to stay in I'd have to give up my lunch). I will take the second recess away for consequences. It's really the only consequence we're allowed to give. We can't send kids to the office, we can't take away trips or parties or other "fun" things, and we can't make them write something. We can call parents, but I find that parents of my "frequent fliers" just don't even care anymore because they hear it so much. I don't feel bad about it because they always have one recess. I pass out homework on Mondays and collect it on Fridays, so kids have to stay in on Friday if they don't bring it back.

    I will also keep kids in if I they don't finish work and they were just goofing around/not even trying to finish. I feel like this is a natural consequence- if you choose not to do the work during class, you are choosing to make it up at recess instead. If the kid is truly working hard and just works slowly, I won't make them stay in.
     
  4. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 13, 2013

    We are not allowed to. State law requires them to have 3o minutes of physical activity every day.
    I DO take away choice. Walking laps is sometimes a punishment for no homework.
     
  5. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    Apr 13, 2013

    In the case of homework there is no clear relevance between homework and recess. What does one have to do with the other? It's one thing if a student is disruptive or has not completed assignments in the morning prior to recess. Then there is a consequence.
    I don't take recess away for missing homework. It doesn't teach them anything. Recess is part of the school day. What you can do is have a positive consequence for those students who complete homework. Earned activities or choice time on Friday or something like that. If homework is due every day then adjust things accordingly. The student who did not earn the "privilege" (by not completing homework when due) would then complete their homework on that day during the choice time.
    The best way for this to work is to time the reward time just long enough so that the student can complete their homework and have a taste of the reward. They need an incentive to do homework.
     
  6. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    Apr 13, 2013

    I don't assign homework and take away as little recess as possible. I teach 6-year-olds... they need to run and play.

    We are allowed to take recess away if we feel it is an appropriate consequence. Since homework is for home, I might send it home again with a note/phone call that homework isn't getting done.
     
  7. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Apr 13, 2013

    I've mentioned before in other threads that homework is a battle I'm not going to fight. If they complete the daily assignment (which is only one double-sided page...one for spelling and the other for math) then they'll do well on Friday's spelling and math tests.

    I do, however, have incentives for those who do complete their homework. I have a Friday "Lunch Bunch" where students get to eat their lunch with me and watch a movie (I also provide a small treat), so my homework completion rate is pretty high.
     
  8. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Apr 13, 2013

    I would not do it for homework. Homework I encourage more with positive incentives. It's just too far out of my control to have such a big penalty - recess is important, and even big kids can have a hard time if their home climate is not conducive to schoolwork. (though I must say, even though I don't actually say anything, I have a bit of gripe with the kid who says he CAN'T do any homework, even on Sunday, because on Sunday he NEEDS to spend 6 consecutive hours "playing.")

    I would, however, dock recess for a child who severely wastes class time. If a kid can't complete his class work because it's too hard or something, that's my bad, but if he fails to even attempt his work in class due to bad attitude or unacceptable behavior, I have him do it in the principal's office during recess. Note: I teach kids with EBD and can put up with a LOT of shtick. This consequence is reserved for the really inexcusable. As I said, recess is really important.
     
  9. EMonkey

    EMonkey Connoisseur

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    Apr 14, 2013

    I do not do anything about homework except talk to mom or dad. They are first graders and I believe a lot of the lack of doing it is beyond the child's control and is definitely beyond my control also. I do have consequences for not doing classwork.
     
  10. missapril81

    missapril81 Companion

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    Apr 14, 2013

    I do take some recess time away, but not all. I also have homework slips that they take home to have signed. They are to tell me why they did not do it. Whatever excuse they give me I let the parents know. I had one student one time who said his parents did not make him do homework so I wrote it down. This is easier sometimes that way if a parent is wondering about grades I can show them how many missed homework and practice skills papers I am missing. The parents find it helpful as a communication tool.
     
  11. Em_Catz

    Em_Catz Devotee

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    Apr 14, 2013

    Wow! So many good ideas. I really like the idea of offering an incentive rather than taking something away! I think that's a happy median for me, maybe having a bi-weekly "lunch bunch" or giving out a small weekly treat (like a sticker or class money) which when saved allows a student to go to our prize box.

    @Ms. Scrimmage: You're so lucky that your school allows this! At my school even the PreK students are required to have daily homework AND weekend homework. The daily I can understand for our 1st graders, but WEEKEND homework?! Even though it's really short, I don't think it's fair. We are pushing these kids so hard during the week, why can't they have their weekend to be free?
     
  12. DrivingPigeon

    DrivingPigeon Phenom

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    Yes, I have them stay in for recess to finish incomplete homework. Our students have one 35-minute recess before lunch. A missed assignment usually takes about 10 minutes to complete, so they still have about 25 minutes of recess to run around. My students just know it's an expectation, so they get right to work when recess begins, get it done, and get outside. No biggie!
     
  13. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Apr 14, 2013

    At my students' age I feel the parents are really responsible for making sure the hw gets done. Now getting the hw back into their hw folders and backpack is a responsibility I place on the kids. In any case, I have not taken away recess for missing hw but have held students at recess if they sat and did nothing but play. I hate doing that but I don't know how else to show the importance of working hard during wirk time so they can play during play time.
     
  14. MissScrimmage

    MissScrimmage Aficionado

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    I would be met with a lot of resistance if I assigned daily homework and weekend homework. I encourage daily home reading and provide prizes for students who complete their monthly forms. I'm so sorry you are forced to push your kiddos past what you know is developmentally appropriate.
     
  15. myKroom

    myKroom Habitué

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    Apr 14, 2013

    We have 3 recesses per day. I never take away lunch recess (which is the longest at 25 minutes). However, depending on how much work they have to get finished, they may stay in for one of the other two. I prefer not to take it away, but sometimes they HAVE TO get their work done.

    Now homework, to me, is a different story. I'm just clarifying, to me homework implies something that was assigned and needed to be completed at home. I don't have homework in K, but when I taught 1st grade, if they didn't get their homework done I counted it as a 0.

    Of course, then you fall into the trap of some schools not allowing 0's. If they don't do their homework at home and we can't give them a 0 you have to find some time in their day to get it done!
     
  16. yellowdaisies

    yellowdaisies Fanatic

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    Apr 14, 2013

    I don't, though some of my coworkers do. I teach first, and as others have mentioned, when 6 and 7 year olds don't turn in homework I think it is often more the fault of the parents than of the kids. I do agree with keeping kids in to finish class work though - as long as the child didn't finish it because they were off task and not because they were really struggling with it. If they play during class, then they can work during the scheduled play time!

    I agree with YTG - I am not going to fight the homework battle. I have chosen not to this year (it's my first year), although lately I've been feeling I really need to start rewarding the kids who ARE turning it in, and hope that the incentive motivates the other kids. We have a classroom economy with tickets they use to buy prizes, so I may just use tickets for that. I already have a lunch bunch with randomly selected students every week (5 students a week), so I don't really want to get rid of that or have ANOTHER lunch bunch... ;)

    In addition to that, homework is an effort grade on the report card, so it's not totally ignored.
     
  17. EiffelTower

    EiffelTower Comrade

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    Apr 18, 2013

    If missing homework becomes a chronic problem, than I will take their recess away. Otherwise, if the homework is not done, an email is sent to a parent and it usually comes back the following day. I do keep kids in at recess if they have a failing grade until they choose to bring it up to a C or higher. That seems to be a highly motivating factor in getting the grades brought up relatively quickly.
     

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