Do you share a classroom?

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by waterfall, Feb 23, 2011.

  1. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    6,090
    Likes Received:
    936

    Feb 23, 2011

    Right now I have my own classroom. It's small, but it is entirely mine (no dividers splitting one room into two, etc.). I'm in an all pull-out program so since I'm actually teaching all day I feel I really need my own room. One of my friends shares hers at another school, but she is full-inclusion so she doesn't actually do any teaching in the room- it's more just an office. We're combining programs next year and there will be two sped teachers- and I overheard my principal saying that we "don't really need two sped rooms, although we do have the space." I can see from a principal standpoint, they don't want an entire classroom for 5-6 kids to use at once (in our current school set up, there just happens to be a half-size room that I use). But I think it's going to be really hard for my kids to focus when there is another lesson going on in the same room. I was sort of in that situation for my student teaching (there was a divider seperating the room, but you could hear every word from the other side). Many of my kids had attention problems too and that was the last thing they needed. However, before I got to this school I'd never seen a sped teacher with her own room...

    If you share a room, how do you make it work with two lessons going on at once? I'm considering bringing this up to my principal (not saying I overheard the conversation- just asking what the situation with 2 teachers would be like), but I thought I'd get some opinions first on what the real problems with sharing a room are, or any pros if there are any.
     
  2.  
  3. dorton

    dorton Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 24, 2011

    I have shared a classroom for the past 4 years and at one other time as well. In both cases we had dividors down the center of the room. I can tell you that it is VERY difficult to make this work, but you can do it. In both cases the other teacher and I were great friends and stayed friends through this. We try and stagger our kids so that we don't have our larger groups at one time, this helps some. The noise level is the biggest issue we have and there are lots of times that I will just go to her side and ask them to be a little quieter. I'm very lucky she is great to work with and very understanding. In our situation we both have very difficult students so we can back each other up when things get crazy making our lives a little easier. Basically it is a lot like marriage it works but you have to make it work. Good luck.
     
  4. bethechange

    bethechange Comrade

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Messages:
    299
    Likes Received:
    1

    Feb 24, 2011

    One year I taught an ASD/EBD class and I shared a room with the ESL/Gifted teacher (not my choice!), due to lack of space in our school. It was a disaster and a half. I would try to advocate to weigh the populations both teachers are going to serve carefully before considering combining classrooms.
     
  5. waterfall

    waterfall Virtuoso

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2011
    Messages:
    6,090
    Likes Received:
    936

    Feb 24, 2011

    I think it's a really bad idea- but due to the combining of schools many people are losing jobs entirely and I don't want to seem "ungrateful" or "whiny" about not having my own room when others are not even going to have jobs. I am k-5 and the other teacher is 6-8. Personally, I think it will be demeaning for the middle school kids to go to the same room for their sped instruction as kindergarteners. I'm also worrying about the older kids picking on my little ones. This other teacher is also used to having her own room, and from what I hear from people who currently work in both buildings (some people are part time at both right now) she and I have VERY different teaching styles and it does not sound like she will be an easy person to get along with. Yes, I am concerned about personal issues- but it really is mostly that I don't think this is a good idea for the kids. I also know we DO have the space- they'd just rather use it for "programming" than have two large classrooms set aside for sped. What do you all think- should I go to my principal about this or keep my mouth shut? I have a good realtionship with my principal- but in a time when jobs are going out the door left and right I don't want to do anything that might make me look like a "problem."
     
  6. EdEd

    EdEd Aficionado

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2011
    Messages:
    3,769
    Likes Received:
    233

    Feb 25, 2011

    So, let me just say wow! That is truly a difficult situation for you to be in - I really can't imagine having to do that, and dorton - amazing that you were able to do that for 4 years and remain so close to the other teacher - you clearly are a team player, willing to be flexible, and have more patience than I can imagine! That being said, waterfall - while it may be admirable for you to try to make this work, I personally don't think "if you don't, you're just being whiny and ungrateful." True, when you look at places like Wisconsin, it can clearly be worse, and being employed is great. However, there are only so many sacrifices that we should make teachers, and ultimately students, endure.
     
  7. dorton

    dorton Rookie

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2011
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0

    Feb 27, 2011

    It is your responsibility to do what you think is best for your students. If you feel that it is not in your students best interests to share a room then it is your job to speak up, especially if there are enough rooms that you don't have to share. All they can do is tell you no. And if they do then you will know that you have done what you should have done for your kids. Go with your gut.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. miss-m
Total: 469 (members: 4, guests: 448, robots: 17)
test