Do you read chapter books?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by TeacherGrl7, May 26, 2008.

  1. TeacherGrl7

    TeacherGrl7 Devotee

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    May 26, 2008

    My little ones, like anybody's, loooooove to hear stories. We go through picture books like crazy, and it is a wonderful fall back when I have an unexpected extra 10 minutes. However, I am thinking it would be so much easier for those unexpected times, to have a longer book that we are working through in a handy location to just pull out...rather than always having to make sure I have a ton of picture books nearby, and keeping track of which class (morning or afternoon) has read what. Does anybody read chapter books to pre-kers, for an extended set of days? How do you like it? How do they?
     
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  3. Butterfly4

    Butterfly4 Comrade

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  4. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    May 27, 2008

    I am just reminded that many of the books we now view as "chapter books" due to their format were written for much smaller children origionally. During other times Alice in Wonderland was completely age appropriate for preschool type ages as were many other long books. In the age before TV children were used to this sort of activity.

    My children at 3 or 4 can listen to the Magic Treehouse type books that the other post mentions, as well as the Lion the Witch and Wardrobe and even a short Odessy by Mary Pope Osborne. It just takes lots of support and encouragement and make sure they are on board with you so that you aren't the only one enjoying the task. You know-like everything else we do with our ages.
     
  5. moonbeamsinajar

    moonbeamsinajar Habitué

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    May 31, 2008

    I have never read chapter books to my preschool classes, although I read them to my own daughter, starting when she was about 3. At one training I went to, they suggested that you sometimes read picture books to children without showing the pages, to develop listening skills.
     
  6. yorkyfan

    yorkyfan Rookie

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    Jun 1, 2008

    I read chapter books to my son starting at age 3 and 1/2. He loved the Ramona books by Beverly Cleary. Also the preschool assistant in the other primary class in my school read chapter books to her kids during lunch time. ( They were 4 and 5 year olds.) The kids loved it! But I do not know what the titles were.
     
  7. Zelda~*

    Zelda~* Devotee

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    Jun 1, 2008

    My Head Start kiddos couldn't handle chapter books. We have multi-age classrooms and while my second year/third year fives might like it, my first year threes and second year fours couldn't do it.

    I like the books they can "help" me read. :D My personal favorite is "The Baby Goes Beep" When I picked it up I thought it would be too young for them, but the little guys adored it!!
     
  8. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Jun 1, 2008

    Knowing your children is what is going to make the reading of anything work. Each day the class is made up of little gems all of which came from different enviornments during the time out of class. These little gems seem like the wear the same faces each morning but in reality they are made up of different needs and desires each entry. So what will work with one group is much different than what will work with another group. What will work with a group on Monday, may not work with the same group Wednesday. So, try it someday you think it might work. Develop the listening and imagination skills necessary by not showing pixs in a regular book until they have discussed what could be happening in the pix. Listen to classical music with an ear towards the images that the composer might be trying to communicate with you. Work on developing dramatic and social play skills with your children. In order to work cooperativally in a pretend game - the children must be able to imagine the pictures and stick to the plan. That is the beginning of the skills they need for chapter books.

    Ps-when i started I asked the children to lie down on their backs (at nap) so the wiggles were lessened. We also used story tapes at nap rather than plain music to get ready.

    Learning is a path. Taking the first steps to an end goal are as important as reaching to goal. If you haven't found your goal on the way, you won't find it at the end either.
     

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