Do You Prepare Your Students For College?

Discussion in 'Secondary Education' started by Math, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. Math

    Math Cohort

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    Oct 24, 2012

    I have read on the forum on how some High School teachers do not prepare their students for college. I am just wondering do you believe you prepare your students for college? Basically, so they will not go to college feeling like this is way too much work?
     
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  3. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    Oct 24, 2012

    I know a lot of our teachers do prepare the kids for college. I'm the special education teacher at my school and I know that most of mine will not attend college. It's a small school so I know what each of my students want to do after graduation so I try to help them with whatever path they have chosen.
     
  4. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Oct 24, 2012

    My school is college prep, and I think we do a great job of preparing our kids.

    Our kids graduate as STRONG writers, with a solid math background and a great liberal arts high school education. They know how to study, how to organize their time, how to prepare for a big exam. They understand the "why" and the "how" and not just the "what" of the things they've studied.

    And I think I do my share as far as all that goes.
     
  5. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    Oct 24, 2012

    They call our lowest level English classes, "College Prep English." I believe it's more or less a "feel good" term. It makes the parents feel like their kid is college-bound, I suppose. However, the students that populate those classes really aren't interested in attending college.

    If they cared, the curriculum we teach in those classes would adequately prepare them for college.

    I chalk it up to trendy education cycles and the "No Child Left Behind" act which made the country feel like ALL students should be geared toward attending a college.


    :down:
     
  6. Mrs. K.

    Mrs. K. Enthusiast

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    Oct 25, 2012

    I sure as heck try.
     
  7. orangetea

    orangetea Connoisseur

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    Oct 25, 2012

    Our students are definitely very well prepared for college.

    Our school was listed seventh for the best STEM schools in the US, so I know that our math and science departments prepare students for college level courses. The humanities departments also do a fantastic job.
     
  8. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Oct 25, 2012

    I think you are referring to my post in another topic. I wouldn't say my son wasn't prepared academically...but because his teachers taught to the middle group of kids in his class, he was not as advanced as HE would have liked. He had a 4.12 gpa in high school. I would put his math teachers--all five--up against anyone in the nation. His science teachers were and are incredible. His social studies teachers were average or below average---but most were coaches. He carried his regular hs courses his senior year plus 15 college credits. He maintained a 4.0 plus in all of them. He was ready for everything but the pace of the work. He can do it, but he was use to having weeks to do a research paper, not a week. He was use to one or two large research papers a semester, not six to eight smaller ones a semester. He is having to learn how to deal with that...I think until kids are paying to go to public schools, the average parent would not support high schools giving that type of work load. Plus most college students don't play sports or do extra activities, so that is not in the mix at college. My son livestock judges...he has practice from 4 to 11 twice a week...yes, 4-11, sometimes 12 to 11 or so. He is having to learn to juggle it all. But that is part of being a grown up.
     
  9. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    Oct 25, 2012

    Not all kids go to college. I hope to prepare my kids to make the right choice on what to do after they leave high school. Whether it be trade school, community college, 4 year college, armed forces, or straight into the work force.
     
  10. KateL

    KateL Habitué

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    Oct 25, 2012

    The majority of my students won't go to college. They might take a few classes at the community college, but they won't go to a 4-year college. If I tried to assign a workload that would get students prepared for college, I would have even more students earning F's than I currently do.

    At my school, we encourage college-bound students to take AP classes. Those classes do assign workloads appropriate for college-prep, and the students are often shocked when they first begin AP classes. They thought they were doing a lot of work in the regular classes, but they really weren't. It's better to have that shock in high school than in college, though.

    So in summary, my regular classes don't really prepare the students for college, but my AP class does.
     
  11. CindyBlue

    CindyBlue Cohort

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    Oct 26, 2012

    "His social studies teachers were average or below average---but most were coaches."
    I really take issue with this implication that being a coach makes one a poor teacher. Three of the best teachers in my school are head coaches of major sports. They know how to motivate kids, they know their subject matter cold and are always going to "clinics" to improve, and they believe and model the ideas that hard work, personal integrity and discipline are the main bricks of the road to success. The amount of time they spend with kids is unbelievable, whether it's while coaching their sport or in the classroom teaching or tutoring after school or at lunch. They CARE about their kids. There may be some coaches who aren't good teachers, but there are ringers in any profession - I know some "teachers" who aren't good teachers, too.
     
  12. paperlabs

    paperlabs Rookie

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    Oct 27, 2012

    I think it depends on what a teacher teaches. For example, if one teaches art, they are less likely to prepare students for college. For this reason, math teachers for example often seem to be called on to include cross-curriculum stuff in their classes to get students to learn the essential thinking skills using art, using English, using History, etc., etc., etc. I am not going to say all other teachers are always low on the Bloom's Taxonomy. I had one teacher try to tell me that every student should take algebra!
     
  13. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Oct 27, 2012

    Paperlabs, I'm not sure what you meant by your last statement but where I am all students are required to take four years of math including algebra II.

    I do prepare my students for college. I teach college prep and AP seniors. I do the best job I can but they also have to put in the effort. My sophomore classes are less geared to college. We only have one level of sophomore classes and not all of them go on to college.
     
  14. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Oct 27, 2012

    Nope. Not all of them. My honors students I try to or at least prepare them for AP courses. My on-level students (which really means low-level in my district) are being prepared for the final exam and if I can, prepared for life after high school.
     
  15. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Oct 27, 2012

    Good for your school..to bad they don't work at his! Our coaches are good at instructing on the field but suck in the classroom.
     
  16. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Oct 27, 2012

    4 years of math is a high school graduation requirement. This includes algebra I & 2, geometry & 1 other class.
     
  17. Rockguykev

    Rockguykev Connoisseur

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    Oct 30, 2012

    I don't know of any state where algebra is not a requirement for high school graduation...

    On the topic, I do prepare my kids but what happens to them after they leave my 7th grade class is well beyond my control. I think the problem is nobody (and I include myself) really knows what college-prep looks like. When some of the best schools in the nation refuse to do AP because it isn't realistically college-prep that should tell us something.
     
  18. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    Oct 30, 2012

    I'm a middle school teacher, and I'm new, so at this very moment, no I don't think my kids come out of my classroom prepared for college. I do do bits and pieces though. I teach them skills on how to take notes, how to stay organized, how to plan their work for the week, how to break apart large projects into smaller goals, what science means past the formulaic scientific methods, and other things.

    I don't teach it all very well yet, but my goals are that my students can come from my classroom with some semblance of study skills, a realistic understanding of science, and what precisely doing science feels like.
     
  19. bondo

    bondo Cohort

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    Oct 30, 2012

    I would say yes. However, the students really just need to be able to make it in the real world. They need to be able to read, write, and think critically. They need to be to interact with different kinds of people and be emotionally intelligent. These, in my opinion, are more important than getting them all ready for college specific tasks. We only use a small fraction of what we learn in college in our jobs anyway.
     
  20. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Oct 30, 2012

    Not even close. Our school is for students who are at least a year behind already, and some are further behind than that. Our goal is to keep them from dropping out and hopefully inspire them to at least try community college. In our 6 years, we've graduated 470 kids and less than 10 have successfully earned a college degree.
     

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