Do you plan the whole year?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by 773 Miles Away, Jul 13, 2007.

  1. 773 Miles Away

    773 Miles Away Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2007

    I've read a lot of posts where people are planning out their year of teaching in their plan books/calendars... this didn't occur to me because it seems impossible in my mind. I can't even plan my own calendar a week in advance!

    What is your strategy? I just figured I would check out the framworks for my state and kind of figure out a general pace.. and start planning lessons (but jsut the lessons, not when they will occur or how long they will take etc).

    So how detailed do you get before classes start?
     
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  3. ~Nicole

    ~Nicole Comrade

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    Jul 13, 2007

    I'm no where near as detailed as Ms.Jasztal but I did take and print out a calendar for the school year (one month per page in word). I tacked it up on my wall and used it to plan my units-my district has purchased curriculum for everything which was not how I was taught in college so just learning how to utilize a teachers edition has been fun this summer.

    Anyway-I'm hoping the master calendar will help keep me on track so I know how long I have to devote to a unit or topic study.
     
  4. peyton1

    peyton1 Rookie

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    Jul 13, 2007

    Planning

    I do plan using my state's frameworks for all year. It seems must easier to plan like this. That way I will be sure and teach all of the learning expectations for my grade.
     
  5. Teaching Grace

    Teaching Grace Connoisseur

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    Jul 13, 2007

    I know my county has a framework for the year. It's just a suggested framework for the year. I don't know how closely I'm expected to follow it though...
     
  6. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Jul 13, 2007

    I'm secondary math.

    I do outline the whole year, but with lesson numbers, not dates. So, for example, my year in Algebra I Honors right now is 84 numbered lessons. That doesn't mean vacation on day 85 though. Some of those lessons will take several days; some may combine into one day.

    But I like having that overview. It helps me keep my eye on what's still to be covered.
     
  7. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Jul 13, 2007

    Our school requires that we turn in a curriculum map showing the target standards and goals, our teaching strategies, and assessment plans. It's very tedious but once you get started it flows smoothly. Let's face it, we all have specific things we must cover before standardized testing in the spring. Yes, we have to have a plan for the whole year. Nothing worse than getting to a week before testing and realizing you haven't covered everything they will need and there's notime. That's just not fair to the students. I'd hate for someone to test me on things I've never learned.
     
  8. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Jul 13, 2007

    We have a district pacing guide for our subjects. And I plan out my themes for the year. But I only plan individual lessons a week at a time. I find it difficult to do detailed plans for a group of students I've never met yet.
     
  9. WindyCityGal606

    WindyCityGal606 Enthusiast

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    Jul 13, 2007

    I agree! Would you please call my principal and tell her!!?? LOL!
     
  10. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Jul 13, 2007

    I just can't plan that far in advance. I think it is a good framework to have but I don't know that I have ever stayed within what the plans or calendar says. You just never know what things may happen throughout the day to throw you off. (fire drill, assembly, parent coming in to help/visit, sick students, students who don't understand the concept, etc.) I usually do my planning a week in advance. Our district puts together a framework for us for reading, math, and science since each of those curriculums in district wide.
     
  11. Babyface

    Babyface Rookie

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    Jul 13, 2007

    I did long range plans for my team of teachers a few years ago when I taught third grade. This year I will be teaching 5th grade so I have to start over with different curriculum. What I do is to use the Excel program on the computer and set up columns. At the top of each column I put the subject. In the first column I put the date of the first week and following down the page with each week. Then based on how many skills I have to teach for each subject and how many weeks are in the school week will determine how to space it out for the year. Some skills will take only a week based on the difficulty and your students. Some skills may take longer than a week. I am able to get each 9 wks. on a separate page doing it this way. Keep in mind, you are teaching children, not lessons. So when you map out your curriculum for the year, you may have to make adjustments based on your students. At the beginning of the year no teacher knows their students yet. Long range plans are only "plans" of what you plan on doing. Just remember, life happens when you are making plans. Good luck.
     
  12. agdamity

    agdamity Fanatic

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    Jul 14, 2007

    My district has high mobility within the district, so we are issued montly pacing guides for all subject areas. I collect lesson ideas and activities and put them in a binder with the standard written at the top and organized by subject, then pull them when I need them.
     
  13. loves2teach

    loves2teach Enthusiast

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    Jul 14, 2007

    My district gives me a pacing guide, with standards & when I should be finished teaching the unit.

    EX: They give 10 standards, and I have 11 days to finish teaching them.

    It is a bit overwhelming, but workable (most of the time :) )
     
  14. swansong1

    swansong1 Virtuoso

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    Jul 14, 2007

    My situation is a little different. I teach 6 grade levels (SPED K-5) so I have 6 sets of standards to meet. I try to group similar standards together and tweak them for each grade level. I'm obviously not going to be able to go into deep depth, but I try to get in the basics. And some of my students are very low functioning so the basics may be even too difficult for them. I also teach grade level work each day, as well, because they still have to take the state exams. So, to make a long story short, I do long range planning (one semester at a time) so I can figure out how to fit all the concepts in.
    It helps that I have the same students each year so I already know them. As new ones come in, they are integrated just like any new student. Have I confused you enough?
     
  15. Missy

    Missy Aficionado

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    Jul 14, 2007

    This is what I do, too! Besides needing to get to know my students, great things come up during the year. For example, one of the things fourth graders need to know is how to write a persuasive letter. Several years ago Crayola was having a contest to name their new colors; it was a perfect time to teach that skill and have it mean something to the students. (Crayola didn't really require a letter with your entry, but the kids didn't have to know that!):) :)
     
  16. MissFroggy

    MissFroggy Aficionado

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    Jul 14, 2007

    I do "quarterly goals." They are broad, maybe like what Missy said. This year I had the idea that I wanted to do some shared inquiry using the Junior Great Books curriculum and listed this as a goal... not sure yet which stories I would do. I had tried to find some connecting to our science, and thought that would be best.

    We were reading a book aloud called "The Giants and the Joneses" which was sort of the giants side of the jack and the beanstalk. During a discussion, a boy said, "We should read Jack and the Beanstalk and compare and contrast it with The Giants and the Joneses" Well, lo and behold, we did, and we did the play Jack and the Beanstalk. I knew this was a story in the JGB curriculum, so we did it. This could never have been planned a year in advance... or it could, but it would not have been generated by the kids.

    I highlight the goals I have met-- but there are always things I come up with that don't get done. I overplan, then save the ideas for another year or time.

    I do my lesson planning at the end of the day (to make changes) and at the end of the week for the following week. I usually have to plan out projects right away. I get the ideas and plan a unit, or a project as soon as it comes up so we can start right away.
     
  17. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Jul 14, 2007

    I have a pacing guide that I made up for myself. I know that I need to teach these units & approximately this many math lessons by the end of the 1st trimester, 2nd trimester & 3rd trimester. That way I cover everything that I'm suppose to cover, but leaves it open for things that come up.
     

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