Do you have to stand in the hallway during class change?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by Southernese, Sep 10, 2011.

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  1. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    Sep 17, 2011

    Our school district has its own police force, also.

    They patrol the cafeteria during lunches and the extra curricular events.
     
  2. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    Our school district has its own police force, too. They patrol the traditional high schools at lunches and before and after school and during sports events. They go to the other campuses as needed.
     
  3. greendream

    greendream Cohort

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    This year, our admin has made a big push for teachers standing in the hallway. If an admin walks by your door and you're not there, you get a stern warning.

    I totally get being out there, being proactive, and all that, but, as many others have expressed, sometimes I need that 5 minutes to set up my activities, or to give a student some extra guidance.

    What kills me about it is that the secretaries very often call us on our classroom phones between classes. Since we've all been drilled to be in front of our doors no matter what, we just let it ring. Then, every kid who comes in informs us, "Your phone's ringing!"
     
  4. callmebob

    callmebob Enthusiast

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    As long as some teachers are in the hallway, it should not be a problem. There is no reason to require everyone to be in the hallway every time. Teachers should take turns, half one day, half the next.
     
  5. maya5250

    maya5250 Comrade

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    We are not required to stand in the hallway when kids transitioning because all the teachers must escort their students to their classes. So, for related arts, we pick kids up in different areas and take them up stairs. The students must walk in lines. We have black lines on the floors so it make it easier. When they are going between their core classes, they travel in group and move in a line to their classes. It has been successful to reduce the lag time for socializing. I work at an diverse urban school with a high free/reduced lunch rate.
     
  6. MLB711

    MLB711 Comrade

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    We are required to be in the hallways and I really dislike it. I need those 5 minutes to collect myself and get materials together for my upcoming class.
     
  7. AnonyMS

    AnonyMS SpEd Para! BASE room aide! RTI Facilitator!

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    Sep 17, 2011

    We are required to stand in the hall during passing period. I teach at a middle school which is a stand-alone 6th grade center. I sometimes have my students line up against the wall before entering so that I enter with them.

    I would never leave my keys or cell phone out on my desk or shelf where the students could see them. I lock them up in a cabinet.
     
  8. TeachAstro

    TeachAstro Rookie

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    Sep 18, 2011

    I agree with callmebob. Of course it depends on the school's actual layout, but I can imagine consistently being required to be in the hallway eating up valuable time used to talk with students about grades, questions, etc. Alternating would allow the best of both worlds, engaging with students/supervising and having time to speak with individuals between classes.
     
  9. KatCon

    KatCon New Member

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    Sep 18, 2011

    Standing in hallway during class change

    Yes! Our school does this to maitain "teacher/staff presence" during the unstructured time. When looking at data, we noticed that there was an increase in discipline problems (bullying, hitting, etc) that took place during unstructured times. Class change time, the cafeteria, and the locker room seemed to be high time for inappropriate student behavior. Standing in the hallway during the transition time has made a big difference. We have to do all that we can to provide a safe environment for everyone.
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 18, 2011

    In terms of being too busy:

    I can understand that, on any given day, something might come up that would keep you from getting into the hallway.

    But if there were a crisis, say a kid passed out, you would get out there, right?? So why not, on most days, get out there to prevent a crisis?

    As to the hallways being unsafe: are these the same hallways that a 60 pound 6th grader is expected to navigate? If the teachers are afraid to be out there, then I think it needs to be brought to administration RIGHT AWAY. Those 60 pound sixth graders are in serious danger if the faculty is afraid of the hallways.You would expect my 11 year old daughter or my 14 year old niece to use those hallways, yet they're so dangerous that the adults are afraid of them?? You, the adults in the building, are her only defense against those who would do her harm in those hallways, and you're in your classroom???

    Someone needs to do something to safeguard those kids. First thing tomorrow morning.

    The very first priority of teachers is to ensure a safe learning enviornment. Kids can't make sense of my math class if they're afraid of getting assaulted in the hallways when class is over.

    Every single teacher who is afraid to go into the hallways has a professional duty, and a duty as a human being, to do something about it first thing tomorrow morning. Speak to an administrator, let him or her know your concerns, and be a force for change.

    But don't leave my daughter or my niece out there in the hallways you're too afraid to venture into. Their safety is far more important than whatever it is you're busy doing in your classroom.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 18, 2011

    Those who do not supervise students because 'it's unsafe' are perpetuating the problem.
     
  12. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    I'm not a human punching bag.

    School police and security are trained (and in some cases, armed with batons) for hallway skirmishes.

    If a school has its own police, security, and hallway monitors, then that means the administration already KNOWS there's a problem.
     
  13. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    And if you're still afraid to go into the hallway that you expect my daughter (or someone else's daughter) to enter, then apparently they don't realize how serious it is.

    The fact that there are armed policemen in the hallways does little to dispell my feelings about the situation.
     
  14. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Alice, I absolutely agree that something needs to done at schools which have teachers fearful of the halls. As you said, many sixth graders, if not part of the problem, are likely scared and in a dangerous situation. And of course students across the gradesa as well. But I would imagine that in the vast majority of those schools, the administration is well aware of the safety issues. In many schools with difficult populations, it's essentially accepted..."there will be fights, there will be weapons, there will be drug transactions--we'll do what we can to keep it all to a minimum".

    More often than not I make an appearance in the halls. But because I incorporate hands-on, collaborative activities and use technology which often needs to be prepared, I need those three transition minutes to do so. Otherwise I have to steal a few minutes from the class period to set up for the activities. Which again, I often to do...it's just not ideal.
     
  15. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 18, 2011

    Your large font is akin to yelling...and it doesn't make you right.
    So stand with the officers. Teachers should show a presence...it sends a message when you don't.
     
  16. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Sep 18, 2011

    I would much rather my kids' teachers take those 3 or 4 minutes out of each class to prepare their materials while the kids do some sort of a warm up, than to get a call from the hospital telling me my child was the victim of an assault-- one that could have been prevented had the adults in charge TAKEN charge. (OK, huge run-on sentence.)

    I don't envy the circumstances under which some of the people here work. It breaks my heart to read how awful some of the schools are. I know, absolutely, that I could not and would not work under the cirumstances that people here post about. As much as I love teaching, I would not be the one working in some of these schools.

    But as adults we at least have the freedom to walk away when we've had enough. Those 11and 14 year olds don't have that freedom.

    They need and deserve our protection.
     
  17. Reality Check

    Reality Check Habitué

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    It would be typing in all capitals that would be considered yelling......so you're wrong.

    At a recent multi-district inservice I ran across this 24-year-old teacher who had this huge scar down the side of his face. During a break, he told me he got it breaking up a skirmish in the hallway...it turned out one of the kids was carrying a razor.

    He'll have that scar the rest of his life.

    He also told me that his principal scolded him for jumping into the middle of it (A colleague of his heard the principal refer to him as a "dumba**" for getting involved and that the slash across his face was "his own fault").

    A teacher in my building who is now retired sustained a back injury breaking up a fight in the hallway. The health insurance company declined to pay his medical expenses, saying that breaking up fights is not part of his job description.

    That's support? That's gratitude? Am I going to risk my health for that? I think not.

    My certificate says "English Teacher," NOT "nightclub bouncer."
     
  18. bandnerdtx

    bandnerdtx Aficionado

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    When I taught in the "inner city" school, we were told specifically NOT to break up fights. We were to call for help, act as a witness and try to keep others from getting involved, but we were instructed NEVER to get in the middle of two students. Doing so was at our own legal and physical risk. Having said that, we were expected to be in the hallways between classes.
     
  19. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Sep 18, 2011

    Thankfully my school isn't that severe. I think dismissal time is out of control school-wide, but between classes in our little hallway it's pretty peaceful. ETA: And as someone said earlier, if it's a day when I have to set up an activity before students enter, there are other teachers in the hall. And when Mrs. Colleague is setting up her science experiment between classes I'll be in the hall with others...usually works out beautifully. :)
     
  20. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Sep 18, 2011

    Same here.
     
  21. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    We were also told during our field work in college to never, ever get in the middle of a fight.
     
  22. Brendan

    Brendan Fanatic

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    Sep 18, 2011

    I am the Principal at an inner city school. I never want my teachers to break up a fight unless they feel confident that they will not get hurt. I do, however, always want them in the hall standing there in case anything happens, so that they can call whoever they need to get help.
     
  23. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    I don't think anyone is suggesting we jump into the middle of a brawl.

    But simply being a presence in the hallways will help cut down on those fights.
     
  24. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Speaking of presence, and I am NOT kidding, I'd like to have a little "soapbox" in the hall...otherwise, and quite sadly, so many of my youngsters tower over me.
     
  25. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Our dean is 5 foot nothing, and is the most feared teacher in the school.

    The kids swear that she's everywhere. Her trick is that she can sneak up on kids... they simply don't see her coming.

    At 5'4", my presence isn't exactly imposing with the high school kids I teach, at least not at first.
     
  26. FunTwoTeach

    FunTwoTeach Rookie

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    I just saw your question....I am in the LA area. I don't know what it would be like to leave my phone and keys on top of my desk. Students already stole my cell phone once, when it was in my desk. Now I lock everything up like a paranoid freak (I admit it). When it was stolen, the principal told me it was my fault and wouldn't even talk to the class about it. When I told other teachers what happened, their response was "at least it wasn't your keys".

    When you work at a school where teachers cars get keyed during school, fake facebook profiles abound, teachers have gotten egged during class, my classroom was already broken into once this year...you pretty much learn to be on the lookout at all times. That's why I wouldn't stand in the hallway unless I could have all eyes on my room, and the administration would not put teachers in a position to do that. By no means do I think this is a healthy school environment, for students or teachers, it's just the reality.
     
  27. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    I'm five foot four and A HALF. :p It doesn't sound terribly short, but I suppose when you're in a crazy-packed hall it's short enough to get lost in the crowd.
     
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