Do you have a curriculum?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by ecteach, Sep 10, 2019.

  1. ecteach

    ecteach Devotee

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    Sep 10, 2019

    By curriculum, I mean a set of lessons and materials that you are expected to use to teach the standards.

    I've never had one. I get the standards from the state website and the Goals from the IEPs and go from there. Everything is on my own.

    I have 15 years experience and teach special ed/self contained.

    Just wondering what others have to work with.
     
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  3. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Sep 10, 2019

    We have a purchased math ‘program’ that we supplement with other materials. Outside of that, no others.
     
  4. readingrules12

    readingrules12 Aficionado

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    No, we have materials and suggestions on how to teach some subjects, but the final choice is up to each teacher. We are just required to teach the standards. How is up to each teacher. I have worked for other schools that have a mandated curriculum for certain subjects. Glad I don't have to put up with that any longer.
     
  5. Ms.Holyoke

    Ms.Holyoke Connoisseur

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    Last year, I had no curriculum and it sucked. I felt like the entire math department didn’t have any consistency for the kids from grades level to grade level.

    This year has been amazing so far because we have a whole curriculum done for us. It’s a top rated math curriculum that focuses on problem solving and inquiry based learning. My district ordered workbooks and manipulatives for each unit so all I have to do is copy the exit tickets to “prep”. The curriculum website has slides made that I modified. I spend more of my time planning for meaningful instruction than I do formatting on Microsoft Word now which is AMAZING. :) I would not be happy if the curriculum was not high quality but it is an awesome curriculum. I’m in a place where I’m much happier with the quality of my instruction and having a good curriculum has made it possible for me to have time to plan more.

    Some teachers might not like having a curriculum because you can't be as creative, but the curriculum that I was provided is much higher quality and engaging for the kids than anything that I can make myself.
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2019
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  6. otterpop

    otterpop Aficionado

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    Sep 10, 2019

    Yes, we do for every subject.
     
  7. TeacherNY

    TeacherNY Phenom

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    Sep 11, 2019

    We make our own curriculum with our own materials.
     
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  8. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    I teach General Ed, but my response is true for Special Ed as well.

    This is the norm here. We use provincial expectations for the "what" of we teach; the "how" is up to us. Textbooks and other commercially produced materials are available to us to use as a resource.
     
  9. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    Sep 12, 2019

    I've never had one. I had to come up with new curriculum every year as I didn't just teach grade 9 to all knew students each year, I was the only English teacher and I've had all the kids so every year it had to be something new.
    I didn't mind, once I figured out what I can do with all that freedom and how to make the best of it without killing myself.

    This is the 2nd year I'm teaching independent study, but last year I alto taught 2 separate English classes and this year I'm teaching ELD for which of course there is no curriculum. I prefer it that way, I'd hate for someone to tell me what to teach and how t teach it, etc.
     
  10. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    I’ve never had one in my entire 27 years. We make our own using whatever we have available.
     
  11. vickilyn

    vickilyn Magnifico

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    Sep 12, 2019

    I think that a curriculum that meets the definition of OP "may" be appropriate in the lower grade levels, but I feel that by the time you are in upper elementary/MS/HS it isn't reasonable. You require more teacher proficiency to teach MS and HS, and a lot of that is being able to know the subject so well that you teach it to varied levels of student engagement, student proficiency, and to adapt lessons to meet varied student needs. I want good texts to be the bedrock, and I want the freedom to use inquiry in the classroom, which should be intellectually stimulating and challenging.
     
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  12. flairpen

    flairpen Rookie

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    Sep 12, 2019

    Same here. Sometimes I’m a bit jealous of people who have their lessons planned for them, but I wouldn’t want to give up the freedom to plan as I please. We are given a lot of freedom at my school.
     
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  13. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    Bit of a sore subject for us this year. I have never had anything in sped up until last year. That goes for "resources" as well- anything I had, I made myself or begged/borrowed/stole. I got some things like phonics boards when my district was getting rid of Fundations and the secretary saved some of the materials that were to be thrown away for me :rolleyes:.

    Several years ago I basically created my own phonics scope/sequence/curriculum, but had no decodable texts. I would write sentences for the students that had the target skills we were working on, but that's not the same. Meanwhile, our title 1 teachers get something new every 2 years or so.

    Three years ago we got a new P who seemed slightly more interested in sped. I pitched a big fit about how we'd gotten a literacy grant "for all tiers of instruction" yet I'd gotten NO materials or resources for tier 3. Last year she bought me the first 3 levels of SPIRE, stating that since I work with K-3 I wouldn't need the others. I proved her wrong when my 3rd graders were ready for book 4 in November. I ended up getting all of the levels. It wasn't that different than what I'd already had kids doing- BUT I wasn't wasting my time making word lists, dictation lists, etc. and I had nice, neat ready to go materials, and tons of decodable text! Also no expectation that I "read the script," which was nice. I also have access to 95% group, which is another phonics curriculum. Like the pp said, because I wasn't spending my time making materials and finding resources, I was able to spend more time actually making the instruction better for students.

    So basically, I had that for one year. This year, the state is all excited about a new literacy initiative that my district has been lucky enough to get selected for! It's explicit/systematic phonics instruction. It's literally the EXACT thing I'd come up with for myself years ago- I could have been a millionaire! Except they are big on "not using boxes" (of curriculum), so now they are not wanting us to use the materials the district spent thousands on. Instead, we are learning "new" things that are basically what we've all been doing for years. And to save money, they didn't make any lists, texts, etc. We get to make our own instead of using the perfectly acceptable word lists and decodable texts we already have.
     
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  14. Backroads

    Backroads Aficionado

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    Sep 13, 2019

    Oh, yes.

    My district is big on having common curriculum. Very big on it. We have curriculum for phonics, reading, math, writing, and fluency. It's quite a packed day with it since they also changed the time expected on everything.

    The nice thing is that while we have this curriculum we are expected to use, we are also totally welcome to supplement.

    I get why the district loves the curriculum adherence and in many ways it's nice, but it's also nice to still be allowed to bring in things.
     
  15. Economacy

    Economacy New Member

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    Sep 14, 2019

    I make curriculum on my own.
     

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