Do you get a break during the day when you sub?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Cinderfella, Dec 10, 2013.

  1. UCLACareerChngr

    UCLACareerChngr Comrade

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    Dec 13, 2013

    In the district I used to sub in, subs got paid by the period, so if they worked extra periods during the teachers prep period we got extra money. Also made it possible to turn down extra periods, because you weren't getting paid for it...although if you turned down periods and didn't help out, you weren't going to get requested often. I don't see a problem asking subs to work through planning periods in other classes where possible, and this is the policy at my current school.
     
  2. Cinderfella

    Cinderfella Rookie

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    Dec 13, 2013

    I have been thinking about the comments mentioning that a sub doesn't really need a prep period. I beg to differ with you. Being a sub can be challenging and there are students who like nothing better than to give a substitute a hard time. I also have subbed in general classes where there are only 9 students and the teacher's note will say something like "you get a break after them but get a good rest because 10th bell is going to be an experience". I think when a substitute faces 6 different levels of students during the day, they should also have the pleasure of prepping for the next class, be it prep time for planning or prep time to just be able to get your wits together and recharge your batteries.

    I don't normally have many of those kind of days but they do happen. When a discipline problem happens, it is very hard to wait until the end of the day to turn in the proper paperwork or even do the paperwork when you are responsible for a class every period.

    Honestly, I can teach 3 different lessons/classes with three different directions in one day and there are times that I need to sit down and read the assignment so that I am familiar with it and be able to answer any questions that may come up. That takes time and that would be done during a prep period.
     
  3. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Dec 14, 2013

    Truly I think the answer is that every sub job is different. When I am out, half my classes just have work days. They are free to work on anything they need to finish up for my class. They are always extremely well-behaved. Obviously there's nothing for the sub to prep then. My other three classes the sub passes out a current event. The kids read it and write a small essay over it. Again, all I expect the sub to do is pass out the article. I do not want them providing a lot of help as I use these a few times a month to assess reading skills.

    My prep is at the beginning of the day. That makes a difference too. Some teachers have their preps last period.

    In my two years at my school, a sub has never had to deal with a major behavior that would require a write-up. I don't want my subs to teach (too many had experiences). There's just not much my sub can do during the day. Many request work during the prep period.
     
  4. bora

    bora Rookie

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    Dec 14, 2013

    I am a sub too. It's true that teacher does all the planning but still we need time to be prepared for the lesson, especially since most of us teach different grades everyday from prek- HS. I need time to get familiar with all plan lessons and to figure out where they are, what they already know and what they don't know yet, or I will be teaching something differently, especially when kids ask for help. Not all teachers leave enough work for us. Sometimes students finish their work within 5 minutes. I have to prepar some extra copies or activities, just in case, because as you already know, students do not work the same with a sub as they do with their teacher. They will leave work undone or give very short answers while you expect them to work on the paper for at least 15 minutes.
     
  5. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Dec 14, 2013

    Just out of curiosity, what do you guys do when the teacher doesn't have their prep until the end of the day?

    This thread also makes me grateful for my kids. They still do great quality work no matter who is in the room! I've never had a sub need to do anything extra with them. Of course, my kids also always have independent reading, so I leave a note that if they finish early, they need to do that.
     
  6. gr3teacher

    gr3teacher Phenom

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    Dec 14, 2013

    My prep is towards the end of the day. The only thing I have left is Language Arts, which I never leave a sub anything more complex than "read this book, have the kids work on A, B and C, give them 20 minutes of independent reading time and have them spend ten minutes writing a reading response, here's piles of extra work in case you need it, which you shouldn't"

    Of course, when my sub can't speak English or read, the read-aloud book doesn't tend to happen unless one of my kids takes the initiative to read it (interestingly enough... that actually does happen sometimes!)
     
  7. mathmagic

    mathmagic Enthusiast

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    Dec 14, 2013

    When I was day-to-day subbing (elementary, so perhaps slightly different), the day would begin 30 minutes before the kids arrive, and end 30 minutes after they leave. Those 30 minutes were always my key time to familiarize myself with what they day will look like, what materials each part of the day needed, and an opportunity to preview and go through each lesson in my mind. Knowing where their recess and lunch times fall right away too was important, so that if I was subbing for a teacher who left hefty bits of teaching in each subject (my favorite times, because I could actually teach :)), I would know what to just skim for the time being so I could be best prepared for the earlier parts of the day.
     
  8. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Dec 14, 2013

    Yes, I think it's different in elementary, and I'm sure the day goes much smoother when you have a few minutes to look over the plans. I think it's very different in secondary, when you can quickly scan the first period plans, get them started on independent work (which I'm sure there is at some point in the period), and then look at the next classes (or more, if you have time). A whole 45-minute block of time in the middle or towards the end of the day seems like it wouldn't be the most useful for looking over the plans, and I'm not sure what else it would be used for then. As others have pointed out, it's not really designed to be a 'break.'
     
  9. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    Dec 14, 2013

    I definitely agree, ama. I don't see much point in a sub having 45 minutes of a break during last period. Even during the day, it would be a lot. My sub plans are not lengthy. They take five minutes to read tops. Everything is clearly labeled and color coordinated on my desk with sticky notes.

    Elementary is definitely a whole different ball game. I imagine those teachers have more direct instruction.
     
  10. Cinderfella

    Cinderfella Rookie

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    Dec 14, 2013

    Honestly, it depends on the teacher and how their plans are written. Some are very straight forward and others seem to write a page for each class.

    When I sub for a teacher who has a planning period at the end of the day, I usually straighten up the room, put up the chairs, write whatever notes need to be written to sub and then I had to the Media Center and shelf books.

    Although there have been a lot of times when a teacher has student aids come in during his/her prep time and those students maybe working on a project for the teacher. If that happens I always stay in the classroom with the students. I have to do that because of any type of emergency, I am responsible for any student who is in my room, whether it is the teacher's prep time or not.

    Each school is different just as each teacher that I sub for is different. The sub has to be flexible.
     
  11. Milsey

    Milsey Habitué

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    Dec 15, 2013

    What makes you think the substitute can't teach? In my state, you have to be a certified teacher. The substitute who usually covers for me is certifed to teach ELA, (she is a retired teacher) so I give her free reign.
    I did have an emergency certifed teacher once and you could tell the class had been out of control. Books on the floor, paper balls, a torn poster, desks askew. I don't know why our state allows emergency certs. Most have never set foot in a classroom, and they only get 2 days of training - without students. Two days!
     
  12. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Dec 15, 2013

    Quite frankly, some subs can't teach. Even some subs who are otherwise well qualified can't teach certain subjects (which probably includes mine). If you don't know who your sub will be, I think it's best to err on the side of caution and go with a so-easy-a-monkey-could-do-it plan.

    Not all states and districts require subs to be certified teachers. Mine doesn't. A sub can be anyone with a few credits of college.
     
  13. teacherintexas

    teacherintexas Maven

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    Dec 15, 2013

    My district just requires a high school diploma. I feel blessed when I get a sub who is literate.
     
  14. bora

    bora Rookie

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    Dec 15, 2013

    My state requires a Bachelor's Degree, and you have to be certified for long term subbing.
    I work as a sub and have a Bachelor's degree, 140 credits in Elementary Education and 4 years of teaching experience( teacher of first and second grade) from another country. I am not certified yet.
    I believe that no teacher or sub can teach any subject from K-HS no matter how qualified he/she is. I accept calls mostly from elementary schools because I feel more qualified and comfortable with this age group of students. I want to give my best(Well, I try at least) and not just babysit students and handle paperwork.
     
  15. Ykk27

    Ykk27 Rookie

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    Dec 16, 2013

    One of the schools I sub for asks me to cover for the prep periods. Usually, I accept gladly, but I do take my time to step by the restroom and get my things done. I get to the class few minutes late, but there is a teacher next door watching, smiling and saying thanks for the covering.
    I see a lot of teachers say that subs have to do this and that, they have to work, and they have to be proactive...But consider that subs don't get paid any benefits, and in my state they are not even employees of the district. The wages are also extremely low, I get 80$ a day, which leaves me with 10-11$ an hour. So, I work just enough for this pay. I can teach, but why would I bother? I just strictly follow what the teacher's left, making sure we complete everything. That's about it. If there are no lesson plans I do no rush around the school. I just call the office and notify them that I do not have any plans. And, someone bring them to me sooner or later. If the discipline is bad, I just leave a note to the teacher so she/he can handle the situation. Such bold approach bears good results. I was surprised to find out that I am considered a good sub!
    Take it easy ;)
     
  16. eternalsunshine

    eternalsunshine Rookie

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    Dec 29, 2013

    I understand that teaching is different from other professions, but depending on where you are you should research the labor laws. Breaks and lunches are mandated by law. And whereas it may not make you popular to ask for what is rightfully yours you do have allotted time for breaks and lunch at least to go to the bathroom!!!
     
  17. bora

    bora Rookie

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    Jan 11, 2014

    I don't ask for a break, but when I work full-day I always get one.
     
  18. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    Jan 11, 2014

    Thank you for that consideration. I have had subs who have never set foot in a Special Ed class before and frankly have no business taking those jobs. I appreciate the fact that you are sensitive to the needs of those students.
     
  19. Cinderfella

    Cinderfella Rookie

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    Jan 12, 2014

    Teachers who work with the autistic children have my utmost respect. They have that special something that lights the students up. I have filled in for a class here and there and last year I did do a field trip (Marcos pizza to deliver pizza boxes that the students had made for them and then to the grocery store to shop)..The teachers that I was with were so very helpful to let me know what the proper response was to the child that they assigned me to watch/assist. I was very grateful for their help. They have asked me several times to come back. But it does leave me with a place in my heart that aches. So I now sub in the class once or twice a year because I know that they have hard time getting subs. Those children are special and very friendly.
     
  20. bora

    bora Rookie

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    I never thought of this. I thought that if posting is opened to everyone that means that is not neccessary to have experience to accept it. YoU will have help. That's why I have accepted it. I don't have experience working with them, but I have seen others working with them.
    I have accepted once. It was in 3-rd grade. Loved it. Students had disabilities but they were so well-behaved, I would say. Only one student though. I was told to be careful with him because he may do something to me since he didn't know me. Someone else worked with him that day. He was fine. Smiling all the time. I just rejected one yesterday after I read your post. It was in the same class, same teacher, that I have been before. :(
     
  21. Nietzsche

    Nietzsche Companion

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    Jan 16, 2014

    In the districts where I sub, they sometimes have trouble getting people for Life Skills jobs. One Life Skills teacher has told me that me that sometimes people accept the jobs and don't want to interact with the students.

    It is a problem for the Life Skills teachers since they need time away from the classroom for IEPs, parent and other meetings.
     
  22. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Jan 16, 2014

    Why would you reject a job in a classroom where you've already worked and been successful just because one person thinks that some people aren't suited to work in those classrooms?
     
  23. bora

    bora Rookie

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    I really want to go back to that class. Loved everybody there, especially the kids. They were so friendly and lovely. I read her post and I am like does every Special Education Teacher feels the same?:confused:
     
  24. LisaLisa

    LisaLisa Companion

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    Jan 19, 2014

    I have had subs who did not have extensive prior experience in special ed yet did a marvelous job with my class. They interacted with the kids and respected the aides. I have asked those subs back.

    I have also had subs who did not interact with the children or sat behind the desk most of the day or did not listen to the aides. Sometimes those subs have years of experience but have lost their joy for teaching.

    My comment was not a blanket statement directed to all subs without experience. You need to walk in with awareness that these are children with special needs.

    Go back and sub if you were successful with the class.
     

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