Do you feel comfortable with regular lessons?

Discussion in 'Substitute Teachers' started by Julie9789, Oct 9, 2010.

?

What's your preference?

  1. Lessons / Preschool-Kindergarten

    8 vote(s)
    36.4%
  2. Sub Work / Preschool-Kindergarten

    2 vote(s)
    9.1%
  3. Lessons / Grades 1-3

    10 vote(s)
    45.5%
  4. Sub Work / Grades 1-3

    2 vote(s)
    9.1%
  5. Lessons / Grades 4-5

    10 vote(s)
    45.5%
  6. Sub Work / Grades 4-5

    1 vote(s)
    4.5%
  7. Lessons / Grades 6-8

    5 vote(s)
    22.7%
  8. Sub Work / Grades 6-8

    3 vote(s)
    13.6%
  9. Lessons / Grades 9-12

    4 vote(s)
    18.2%
  10. Sub Work / Grades 9-12

    3 vote(s)
    13.6%
Multiple votes are allowed.
  1. Julie9789

    Julie9789 Companion

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    Oct 9, 2010

    I'm not sure if there's a similar thread, but I figured I'd start one anyway.

    Long story short, my 2nd week of teaching and I had to take off 2 days. Thursday I provided regular lesson plans detailed out. I had all my copies done and everything. I was only planning on being out this day, so I didn't bother with plans for Friday. Then my doctor told me I had to take off Friday as well, but not having time to do plans and copies, I just told the school to use my emergency plans which were left for me by the previous teacher whom I replaced. These plans are pretty much packets and worksheets aka BUSY WORK for the students to do all day.

    So, as a sub...do you prefer the teacher to leave you Detailed Lesson Plans or Sub Work (like Busy Work) that doesn't require much direct teaching?

    I divided the poll into schools/grades because it probably varies.
     
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  3. Subber

    Subber Companion

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    Oct 9, 2010

    I can handle either way but I strongly suggest not to just write a bunch of sentences as a big paragraph for each period. Sometimes, sub gets called at the last minute and by the time we got to school, the class's already started or we picked the kids up and got to class and we didn't get enough time to read such mumbled paragraph ans sort out the important parts like "they (say Math folders) are in the grey tote in the back cupboard near blah..blah..blah"

    Even if we get time to read them, we had to read them again as each period begins and so it'd be more effective if the information is laid out in a way that is easily accessible by skimming while the kids are trying to get the attention constantly.

    It seems that the teacher assume that just because they requested the sub ahead of time, the sub they got was offered the job ahead of time. I have come to find out from a few teachers that they had requested plenty of time enough while I got a call only 50 mins to an hour before I got to school. They were shocked when they learned about it.
     
  4. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Oct 9, 2010

    It will always just depend on the sub too. I normally just leave busy work. This week I got sick and left some detailed plans with actual lessons. I guess the sub decided she didn't feel like doing any of it... I came back and had to do all the lessons I had hoped she had done. Most of our subs are really, really bad. It took me an hour just to clean up the mess she left me in my room. She destroyed some of my guided reading books by spilling water on them. Needless to say, I was not very happy. It was probably the last time that I will even consider leaving actual lessons for a sub unless I know it is a sub capable of teaching, not just passing out papers.
     
  5. Subber

    Subber Companion

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    Oct 9, 2010

    Not to defend the sub but what should be taken into consideration is the kid's non-cooperation approach when there is a sub teaching. it makes a HUGE difference. There just are too many variables that get thrown toward the sub to do the job efficiently.
     
  6. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oct 10, 2010

    I could do either because I feel I'm capable, but why not make it as easy & smooth flowing on the sub as possible & give busy work? And I'm not trying to sound lazy here. Every teacher has differing opinions about this topic. They may like just giving busy work because they want to teach concepts themselves & don't want to risk the sub teaching it a different or confusing way. Then, there's those teachers who'll let the sub introduce a new topic, etc.

    By the way, I don't get offended at all when only assigned to give busy work. Some subs may get offended that the teacher may think all subs are stupid & can't handle more than that. I personally may have a higher degree than the teacher him or herself & I say, if the teacher wants to just give worksheets all day, fine w/ me, I'm getting paid the same daily pay either way! :)
     
  7. mandagap06

    mandagap06 Devotee

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    Oct 11, 2010

    WOW!! I really,really,really hate you feel this way!! I don't know what really to say other than nobody comes from the same mold..and although some subs may be bad they are not all bad...That would be like me saying since the HS teacher I had for all 4 yrs was a terrible math teacher than all math teachers are terrible(so true store, but not true about all math teachers..I am done with college math, but the 2 math instuctors I had were AWESOME,CARING, HELPFUL etc!!!)
     
  8. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 11, 2010

    About half the subs I get are like this. I'll hear from students in every single class that the sub plugged in his laptop in the back of the room and watched Iron Man or something while the class was working on their assignment. :mad:

    For that reason I don't usually leave actual lessons. I leave either 1) practice work, where students are asked to hone some skill we've already been working on, 2) reading/note-taking for something in English, either about culture or grammar, or 3) an educational video. While I would love to be able to count on a sub to teach an actual lesson, I've come to the conclusion that it's just better if I don't expect that.

    Note: about half my subs have been very good. They follow my plans, take attendance, and seem to keep my kids in line. I don't come back to a filthy classroom or a messy desk, which I appreciate. The biggest problem for me is that I never know if I'm going to get one of these subs or one of the other ones.
     
  9. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Oct 11, 2010

    UVAgrl928 & Caesar753, that's really disappointing to hear. So many subs give us great ones a bad name. It's like how 1 bad review about a restaurant does more damage than 10 positive comments. I would NEVER slack off like that or leave anything out of order. I hold myself at a higher standard. If I felt like watching a movie, I wouldn't work that day & go to the movies or something, but I definitely would NOT sit w/ magazines, etc. while the kids worked.

    As you read above, I've already posted about how I personally feel about it.
     
  10. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I'm fine and flexible either way. I mostly have to teach, use the smartboard, computers, set up AR, plus teach and it can be overwhelming especially since you have not planned the lesson yourself and have no preparation for it. I've even had to pull Reading Groups. Time management and classroom management have to be tops for that, and maybe some teachers forget or don't know what subbing is really like. It worked out fine for me though, but it was tense.

    I do not like plans that are too detailed. If I need to teach Math, just show me the textbook and what pages, and any key concepts, but please don't leave 13 sentences about 1 lesson.

    Also, some directions are not very clear at all. Because the balance is hard to find, I guess I do prefer a more simple approach to sub plans because it's either too much or too vague.

    The more information a teacher leaves, the more overwhelming it can be for any experienced sub.
     
  11. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I prefer detailed lessons, but it doesn't really matter, as long as it's well-planned and thorough. I like to teach. The only things I have an aversion to arts and crafts or something like that, since I'm not good at those.

    I don't like "busy work," in general, but again, I don't mind it. As long as the class knows to do their work, busy work is just part of the job. But sometimes, students get bored with listless worksheets and seat work, and they tend to talk or get restless and it leads to behavior problems.

    Sometimes, the best "sub work" is not really busy work or leading a lesson. It could be just a routine or assignment that the students do all the time, but still doesn't require much from the teacher except observance and a little help. It could be centers, mini-projects or things like that. I like just seeing the ideas kids create.
     
  12. azure

    azure Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I much prefer lesson plans with an assignment that the kids know WILL COUNT. Many students know if it's just busy work it won't count for a grade, so they blow it off, and sit there and cause problems.
     
  13. kteachone

    kteachone Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I do a schedule in a notebook, and try to lay everything out by the schedule so there is no wasted time searching for random bits.
     
  14. substitutesftw

    substitutesftw Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    Absolutely. Sometimes, kids realize when they're doing "busy work." They're older and more savvy. If they know they won't be held accountable for it, they have no real reason to do it.

    That's why I'm usually vague when I respond to questions about whether or not something is a grade. :lol:

    I always leave the assignments for the teacher, whether students complete them or not. I just like teachers to see that the class actually did some work, completed most or all of the activities, and have tangible evidence of the day's productivity.
     
  15. waffles

    waffles Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I agree too. I totally understand that a teacher won't necessarily want some random sub to be responsible for teaching something. But when it's work that the kids know, or assume, isn't going to count for anything there isn't much I can do.
     
  16. azure

    azure Companion

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    Oct 11, 2010

    Yeah, and sometimes I even make those who didn't do it, put their name on the blank paper and hand it in, so the teacher can see that they made the deliberate choice to sit there and do nothing.
     
  17. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I much prefer receiving the same plan that the teacher would use his/herself.
    Teachers should not have to fall behind a day because they are not available.
    However, teachers also have to keep in mind that subs do not always have the luxury of studying the plan in advance, so sometimes we do have to teach on the fly.
    Ideally, I like to get to the class at least 45 minutes before the students.
    This is not often possible however because we are at the mercy of the school secretaries who usually arrive about a half an hour before the students, and have to get settled. Secretaries are also late about 20% of the time.

    It is not unusual to have to wait for the room key until about 10 minutes before class starts. Additionally, there is the occasional morning duty.

    There is nothing wrong with busy work if teachers feel the plan might be too difficult to follow, but the work should be relevent to the standards to be covered for the day, and the teachers should help subs out by applying it to students grades to motivate them to stay focused.

    Another option is to do both and give the sub a choice.
    Let the sub know that these are the plans you had for the day, and that any or all of the plan is optional. Have them teach that with which they are comfortable, and then use the busy work when necessary.
    Just make sure you tell the sub to leave a note about which part of your plan they covered.
     
  18. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Oct 11, 2010

    Teachers are also victims of "The System".

    Because subs are not respected by " The System", and we are just on-call, low wage, no perks employees, it only makes sense that there are thousands of subs who are only buying time before beginning their desired unrelated careers. They have no interest in pursuing an education career, so they just don"t respect their job enough to do a good job.

    If it was more difficult to become a sub; if the field was limited to those who who are pursuing or have credentials, and subs received limited contracts with guaranteed work, teachers would have to worry far less about getting a bad sub.
     
  19. jen12

    jen12 Devotee

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I prefer a full lesson plan over busy work because I believe the continuity assists in classroom management. The kids know when something is diverging from what they normally do. They reallly young kids have a very difficult time when a sub does any little thing different than their regular teacher. And older kids will go bonkers if they think an assignment "doesn't count," even if you assure them otherwise, if they sense it's busy work, it's harder to make them do it.
     
  20. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Oct 11, 2010

    I really dislike busy work as a sub. It makes all classes, all grades (prek to 5) harder to keep on task. The kids know when it is just busy work. I don't come into a class just to babysit. I'm sickened that so many subs treat it this way...leading teachers to provide busy work as opposed to their normal plans. I wish more teachers would provide the daily plan...or at least work that builds directly on what students are learning. Please don't leave just color the quilt math sheets, and other work that kids know you will not look at the quality to which they did the work. Please don't leave a video all day (I have had a teacher do this) Do not leave busy work for a job that is longer than one day. Please don't leave busy work and put a party in the lesson plans for the morning.
     
  21. UVAgrl928

    UVAgrl928 Habitué

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    Oct 12, 2010

    I think it is also dependent on how long the teacher is going to be out. When I am randomly out one day, I'm okay with leaving some busy work. But I get sick very easily, and when I'm down, I am out for a while. Sometimes I will be out for 3-4 days, and I can't fall that far behind. One of my teammates last year suffered a stroke and was out for two weeks... she HAD to leave some real lessons.

    When we find a good, qualified sub, we normally hire them for a teaching position when one pops up. We try to scoop up the good ones, but then we don't have any good subs left!
     
  22. midwesttchr

    midwesttchr Rookie

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    Oct 12, 2010

    I applied to sub K-5, although so far this school year I've been mainly in lower elementary classrooms. Sub plans for these grades are best written with extra activities or ideas for down time. That way, if something goes wrong (i.e. the CD player won't play for a certain activity), I can jump right into the next activity without 22 Kindergarten kids starting to itch. It also shows how well the teacher was able to plan that day (understandable of course if he/she can't). Nonetheless, I find that my day runs much smoother when I can't get everything down, versus getting finished with activities too quickly. I'm sure you all know what a hassle any classroom can be with too much down time, especially lower elementary!

    Another aspect I really appreciate in sub plans are behavior management tips, so that I can stay consistent with how the teacher gets attention and whatnot. Again, this is valuable information to know going into K-2 classrooms. Sometimes the teacher will even leave names of students that are helpful and what students to watch and be aware of. This early in the school year, not every teacher has been able to jot these names down, but then as a sub I let them know in my notes to them which students I found to be helpful and which weren't as helpful.

    Considering I've been subbing for 27 out of the 33 days of school this year (and with 4 of those days being ones I got called for but couldn't sub), I think I'm on a good streak. :) Must be doing something right!
     
  23. midwesttchr

    midwesttchr Rookie

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    Oct 12, 2010

    Hmm. In the state I live in, we are required to have a teacher license ON HAND before we can sub. One can apply to substitute teach prior to graduation, but he/she does not step foot into a classroom until there is concrete proof of a license.

    Of course, I have family that lives in Texas and Tennessee, and I believe subs do not need a license to be employed there (although they are paid less per day without one).
     
  24. Julie9789

    Julie9789 Companion

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    Oct 12, 2010

    I was out Thursday and Friday last week. Thursday was planned and Friday I didn't know about until Thursday because I went to the doctor.

    So Thursday's plans were actual lessons. Oh boy were they planned. I got in trouble so many times in college for adding TOO much detail to my lesson plans, so it came easily to me. Everything went well....or so the sub's note said. The only problem I ran into was when I reviewed multiply a whole number by a decimal...the sub taught them to go from LEFT to RIGHT in placing a decimal. Oh no!! They were so confused.

    Friday's plans were a mix depending on the class. I didn't have time to make lessons for everything. The things that I could get done (all supplies at school, or could be emailed to my team leader) were taught. Like they gave a spelling test, and read selection 2 in their anthology. That was easy to plan out. Math and Science I had the sub do busy work. Unfortunately the sub didn't understand what "math" and "science" meant and gave them language arts seat work to do. Oh well.

    I think all teachers should be required to do sub work for a while. Not only does it get you out in more schools, but it gets you prepared for what it's like to have a sub and teach different grades. Just my opinion.
     
  25. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Oct 13, 2010

    I agree. I had a classroom for a while after subbing. It really gave me a great idea of what was NEEDED in a sub folder, lesson plans, and emergency plans. Emergency plans were busy work, regular plans were not.
     
  26. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Oct 13, 2010

    Here in California, all one needs is a 30 day substitute permit.

    If one has a college degree, they can take what is called a CBEST exam which lasts a couple hours and tests one general ability to read, write, and do math.
    If one passes this exam, they can sub. They do not need any education courses, nor do they need to be pursuing a credential.
     
  27. mandagap06

    mandagap06 Devotee

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    Oct 14, 2010

    I do not like or agree with this at all!! I hope your not a sub who just said that!! I did not look or notice!! I am a sub myself and I am doing this as way to gain education experince since I am in school to teach. I love kids so this is fun for me...I take each class I sub in as if it were my own classroom and my own kids. When kids misbehavor or won't work or don't understand the work I take it personally!! The part highlighted it terrible and mean....even if a sub was not looking to get into education as a full time teacher does not mean they hate their job or are not good at it!! This whole post was like you were attacking me personally and it really hurt my feelings!! People can be a lot meaner online so watch what you type!!
     
  28. hatima

    hatima Devotee

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    Oct 14, 2010

    Mandagap06, oldstudent did say "we are just on-call" so it sounds like she is talking about this from the perspective of another sub.
    I hate to say it because I am a sub who takes my job seriously...I don't just see it as a babysiting gig or as a job to pass my time, or pat a resume.

    Most of the subs I have met have no interest in teaching and openly state that teaching is beneath them. Many of the subs I've met do not care and do not teach when they go in the classroom. (this is why more and more teachers leave "busy work") They disregard the teacher's plans, the schools system and schedule--including duties,and other safety procedures, and even the children. I am sickened by these subs who don't care. I have met ones who have been laid off due to the economy and are subbing because as many of them have said "it is the only job I can get. And leave quickly if REAL work comes along." While looking down on teacher, EAs, and support staff, they continue in disgust saying that "It isn't fair that all these education kids are getting the jobs for subbing. (district) shouldn't allow those people." I was shocked to hear this. I have argued with these people, who see their science or math degree as being more valuable to society than anyone who wants to work in the schools.

    Sub jobs should be for qualified teachers or those pursuing teaching. The pay and benefits should reflect. Districts should respect subs through pay, benefits, and professional development---qualified teachers and those who are employed as subs If states showed more respect to subs, better subs will stay in the districts. I can't wait until I get a job in a classroom...I hate the way I am treated because of the bad subs, that do reflect on all, I have heard that so much this year. Teachers are shocked that I care and do the job right...they tell me horror stories of subs that they have worked with.

    The sad sorry reality is there are many horrible subs across the country. And in many places it is way to easy to become a sub. There are no real checks to insure continual quality work.

    Please remember this.
    Subs like you are rare. Subs like you are a treasure. Subs like you are golden, and teacher do cherish you.​
     
  29. midwesttchr

    midwesttchr Rookie

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    Oct 15, 2010

    :eek:hmy::wow: Well said, Hatima.
     
  30. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Oct 15, 2010

    Yes, I have been subbing for 14 years.

    I am sorry you take offense to my comments. However, those comments do not represent all subs, and they certainly do not represent the subs on this forum. Most subs pursuing an education career will do their best every day. I certainly do.

    The subs here most likely do take their job seriously, and most of them ,including myself, agree with the passion and respect you have for the children and your job.
    However, since "the system" does not respect subs, it will attract some subs who unfortunately do not take their job seriously.
    This is evidenced by many of the contracted teachers who visit this forum to relate their negative experience with subs.

    Substitute teaching arguably has fewer perks or benefits than any job requiring a college degree.
    There are very few, if any, jobs requiring a college degree that offer no health benefits, no sick pay, no vacation pay, and no bereavement pay.
    If we cannot make it to work because we must tend to sick children, sick pets, our car does not start, or we have an appointment, we simply lose a day's pay we do not get back.
    And, of course, we are disallowed unemployment benefits even when no work is available.
    Therefore, when you consider how easy it is to become a sub along with the total lack of financial perks, it only follows that this field attract many individuals who should not be subbing.

    If "the system" ever changes, my comments might someday be obsolete
     
  31. Pookie

    Pookie Rookie

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    Oct 16, 2010

    Not trying to upset anyone, but I want to give my honest opinion. I believe there are mostly two types of subs, those that choose to be subs because they want to, and those that are subs because they couldn't get hired for a full time job (teaching or other profession) because they are either not qualified, too lazy to look or simply no one wanted to hire them. I understand there are many reasons why no one wanted to hire them that have nothing to do with the person.
    When you become a sub you understand that you aren't going to get regular work or benefits. If you are doing it because you can't find another job, you should be thankful you have some type of income over none, and if you are because you want to, you knew the terms when they hired you. It's not a job for everyone. I personally don't care about benefits, or need to work everyday, and I love the flexibility, so it works perfect for me. I want to be a full time teacher someday, but for now i am just going to enjoy the experience and being able to observe how other teachers set up their classrooms, to give me ideas of how I will set up mine.
    When you got hired as a sub you knew the pay, and the lack of benefits, and you still applied for the job anyway. If you don't like it then find another job. No one is forcing you to be a sub. Substitute teaching is considered full time work, and if you do get to work full time then you are lucky, because many subs don't. I think it would be ridiculous for a school district to have to pay subs on days they don't work, the number of teachers out each day varies, subs that do poorly aren't offered as many jobs, therefore they would be paid more often for days they didn't even work then subs that were good and being requested all the time. How would the district know if you didn't answer the phone because you were busy or you wanted a paid day off?
    If I feel sick I can miss as many days as I want to without having a boss getting upset with me. If I want to go on a spontaneous vacation; I can do it without worrying about asking for time off and hoping i get it. If I decide I want to stay out late on a Tuesday, I can do it without having to get up for work early in the morning. If I'm feeling stressed and need a break, I can take it whenever i want. If I decide I want to take a class offered at 10am on Thursdays I can take it. I don't have to write lesson plans, I don't have to stay at the school after the bell rings, if I have a bad class I don't have to work with them ever again. I have never gotten in trouble for not having something done on time or because my class has low test scores or any of the other reasons I hear teachers complain about.

    By you, I mean anyone that is hired as a sub, not a specific person.

    The only change that I think should be made with the system is the pay. I do think that subs with more experience and credentials should be paid more then those without, at least a little more.
     
  32. LoveToSub

    LoveToSub New Member

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    Oct 19, 2010

    I've subbed high school three times in the last two weeks. Two of those days had "busy work" and one was a class that I was actually involved in teaching/helping the students with their work. Which one was more enjoyable to me? The one with student interaction! I find it very boring to just assign pages ___ to read and answer questions ___. Subbing in history and working with the AP students on their test, studying with 10th grade US History students about the Constitution, etc. was a lot of fun for me.

    For full-time teachers out there - please leave "real" lesson plans! :)
     
  33. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Oct 19, 2010

    Assigning reading passages and comprehension questions isn't busy work.
     
  34. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Oct 21, 2010

    In my proposal of how the system should be changed to more fairly represent the value of subs , the "on call' method that you enjoy so much would not be eliminated, it would serve as a necessary supplement to subs with limited contracts.
    The on call system works well for some folks, and should continue "as is" for their benefit, and for the benefit of the districts to provide enough work on days where many subs are needed.
    The on call method works well for those who are seeking a supplemental income and do not need work everyday. Retired teachers who still desire some occasional work, and those who have benefits through a spouse's plan, probably enjoy the freedom that subbing provides.
    However, even for these on-call employees, I feel that they should earn paid sick days for a certain number of days worked. One day for every 30 days worked would be fair.
    This would help negate some of the inherent unfairness in the system.
    Subs should not have to throw away a day's pay when unexpected emergencies surface and they need to cancel a job. A sick day for every 30 days worked will help ease this situation.

    It is also true that subs should not be paid for days that they voluntarily want off. However, if the EDD(Unemployment Development Department) wants to check up on subs to make sure they did not turn down work, they can choose to do this.
    However, thousands of union workers turn down work all the time and instead continue to collect unemployment, The EDD does not seem to care.
    For those of us who are seeking full time teaching in education, whether our goal is full time subbing or full time in our own classroom, the current system does not cut it.
    I feel that subs who are either fully credentialed, or near to finishing up their credential, should be offered limited contracts with limited benefits.
    These contracted subs would not be paid for days they do not work. Instead, if they are not needed to replace a teacher for the day, they would help other teachers by leading reading groups, tutoring special students, or grading papers.
    Since I would only expect districts to offer sub contracts based on their pre-determined minimal needs for an average day, the majority of contracted subs would be needed to take a class.The on call subs would cover the overspill on heavy sub days.
    How many potentially good teachers are forced out of education because they cannot afford to sub under the current system?

    I am lucky. I have invested money since my teens, and have been fortunate enough to have inherited a share of property income.
    Otherwise, all the time and money spent on my education would have been wasted because I could not afford to live on $20,000/year, while paying over $400/month for my own medical insurance.
    I would have been forced out of education. How many college graduates earn such low wages with no perks at all?

    Yes, we do choose to sub and we know what we are getting into, but this is because it might be our only choice. Most of us are hoping it is very temporary and will lead to full time. Yet this is less likely in today's economy with rampant teacher layoffs. If we are forced out do to "the system", Oh well, that's tough!

    As an aside, a teacher called me recently to work in her class.
    When I got to the school, I was sent home because the district never put my name in , even though she claims she called them. Another sub got my job, and I was sent home with a loss of $100 that I will never recover.
    Do I have any recourse? No, I am just a sub without representation. If I complain, they can merely stop calling me, and there is nothing I can do.

    Chalk another one up to " the system."
     
  35. hac711

    hac711 Companion

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    Oct 25, 2010

    movie day!!! Is def. my favorite. There are too many factors when we sub. Kids don't (middle high) care that you are an adult and trying to teach them anything. review work packets are great too! (with an answer sheet for us...I subbed an AP Calc 3 class...it could have been ancient Greek for all I knew...I played it off though like I was a math genius b/c of the thoughtful answer sheet!)
     
  36. John Lee

    John Lee Groupie

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    Oct 28, 2010

    I think you are getting bent out of shape for a misunderstanding. The previous poster was just stating her opinion based on her experience... one that I happen to agree with completely (9-year sub), which basically was:

    It's a thankless job. They expect you to have the utmost of respectability, ability. But really, how can you expect much of anything, considering the low barriers to entry and meager pay. There are no pay raises to be had, and especially these days, no potential for vertical growth. In other words, you have a thankless job, meager pay, no potential for advancement, no medical, no benefits, no future... how much can you reasonably expect?

    Pookie, you trippin boo...
    Or maybe you ain't seen (how bad it is around the country)... in my area , we done recently had 1,000 applicants for a position. In the school district that I done put in 9 years of dirt in yo--they've laid-off 100's of teachers (teachers that are ahead of me, a sub, for a spot at the trough)... it's not a question of laziness--it's simply a question of not even getting a chance.

    As a sub who's probably seen/worked in 500+ classrooms over the years, I think I'm a fair judge of the workings of a room. And I'm also a fair judge (judging by teacher comments, student involvement/respect, parent comments) of my own ability. And just by those criteria, I think I'm among the best teachers in my district (especially in the grades I'm credentialed in). Again, this is not me tooting my own horn or living in a fantasy. It's just like I said though boo: aint no jobs to be had, you done heard? So it's not that I'm lazy, or too stupid to earn credentials or whatever... they ain't offering nathan, ya dig?
     
  37. oldstudent

    oldstudent Comrade

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    Oct 30, 2010

    Thank you for your support John Lee. I wish more subs and contracted teachers agreed with our point of view.

    One of the problems might be understood by a brief conversation I had with a union representatives in one of my districts this week.
    I did not know he was even a union rep until we were finished, or I would have tried to engage him more.
    Just before leaving, he mentioned that when the issue of subs come up in meetings, the contracted teachers vote against us getting any representation.

    Of course, the price they must pay for this attitude is the occasional(or frequent) "bad" sub.

    I can forgive you for the stereotype, but I am a "he".
     
  38. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 30, 2010

    I generally leave things that the kids already know how to do for subs- word work, writing entries in notebooks, reading workshop. I tend to not leave 'new concepts' for a sub to teach, but I will leave reinforcement lessons for concepts I have recently taught.
     
  39. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Oct 30, 2010


    Good point.
     
  40. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Oct 30, 2010

    Would you be willing to pay union dues?
    Not sure why knowing what the expectations are is overwhelming?

    Generally, when a teacher leaves detailed plans (13 sentences about one lesson), it's because it's either a new concept, or the teacher knows how the lesson should best be presented to the class..it's not about not trusting the sub, it's about the classroom teacher being ultimately responsible for the instruction and wanting it done in specific ways based on what the teacher knows about how the kids in the classroom learn best.
    I once left detailed plans for a math lesson on measurement (grade 2). I specifically told the sub that the kids should be measuring to the nearest whole inch- not fractions of inches. I happened to run into the sub later in the day and she told me she decided the kids were 'ready' for the fractional parts so she let them do that...and when I saw the papers the fractional parts were wrong. So I had to re-teach that lesson entirely- completely wasting the time I had spent writing detailed plans and having to backtrack with my kids.

    The great subs in my district appreciate detailed plans- and I know I can trust them to follow the plans, leave me good notes, manage the kids, resources and materials in the classroom.
     
  41. webmistress

    webmistress Devotee

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    Oct 31, 2010

    No 2 teachers will teach the exact same way. Many subs, such as myself when I was a sub, are very qualified to get through a basic lesson without 13 sentences for one lesson.

    Also, more important than the length, organized and clear and concise directions make all the difference. That's really the key.

    I have taught new Math concepts with no background knowledge of the particular concept. Took me a few minutes to figure out the TE, and how to present the lesson in my own words, and then make sure they grasped the concepts for that day.
    The teachers were pleased.

    As a regular teacher in my own room, I would never expect someone to present a lesson the exact way I do. As long as the sub hits the basic and correct concepts, that should be fine. I'll re-teach it either way, because that's my classroom and total responsibility after all.

    Extremely detailed lessons are not a bad thing, they are just overwhelming to me, because each teacher has a completely different writing and organizational style, and working with and having to decipher so many different ones every day, on different grade levels can be overwhelming, but according to principals/teachers/students, I managed to do excellent either way, but I just personally prefer less wordy, simpler plans.
     

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