Do you do lesson plans?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by DrivingPigeon, Apr 7, 2013.

  1. TamiJ

    TamiJ Virtuoso

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    Apr 7, 2013

    Uh oh! I very rarely play movies. In fact the only time I play movies is when we have a mandatory party. For example Halloween. Personaly I would rather just have the day off. We do a morning parade and a mandatory party until noon. Then the kids go home.
     
  2. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    Apr 7, 2013

    I had to write elaborate plans and get prior approval everytime I wanted to show a Bill Nye video, or something similar.

    The only day that I really want to show a movie for entertainment is on field day. After playing all morning, it is impossible to teach anything.
     
  3. FarFromHome

    FarFromHome Connoisseur

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    Apr 7, 2013

    I definitely do lesson plans this year, since it's my first year teaching music. I've always done them, but I usually just list the activities that I will do for each subject. I did notice that I wrote less when I was in my 3rd and 4th year in the same grade level. I had a lot more free time also! I've been switched around so much now that it's necessary to write a little bit more.
     
  4. 2ndTimeAround

    2ndTimeAround Phenom

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    Apr 7, 2013

    I show two movies per semester. We aren't supposed to show full movies, but instead show clips. I got admin's permission to show two 60 minute clips ;)

    I could do without the videos of course. Millions of people have learned my subject long before the movies were ever made. But I want to include the emotional part of the discovery/debate and the wide panoramic shots and sweeping music do a much better job than boring old me up front.

    If I were told I absolutely could not show the movies I would manage, of course. But I really think it would impact student learning.
     
  5. leighbball

    leighbball Virtuoso

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    Apr 7, 2013

    We are required to hand them in once a month...non tenured teachers do twice a month. I don't make them very detailed, but I do if I will have a sub. I couldn't imagine not doing them...but then again, I've taught 4 different grade levels plus basic skills in 10 years so I have need the plans to help me keep things straight. :)
     
  6. YoungTeacherGuy

    YoungTeacherGuy Phenom

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    Apr 7, 2013

    I have a rough sketch of what I want to teach for the week mapped out in my head. Typically, I end up teaching a little more than what I had anticipated.

    The only time I write out detailed plans is when I have a sub. My bf calls it a "script" because it ends up being 6-8 pages of plans. I try to make the plans "foolproof" and I want the kids' day (the sub's day, too) to be seamless.
     
  7. bison

    bison Habitué

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    Apr 7, 2013

    This is a good thing. I'm in classes with subs very often, and unless they've been subbing in the same class for many years, they usually have tons of questions because of vague or unclear plans. I can't always answer because I don't know what the teacher intended for a lesson, especially if it strays from the usual routines. I help them make an educated guess, but a clear plan would be better! On rare occasions, I've also seen things taught incorrectly because they weren't clear in the plans or there were no real resources for the sub, so they have to come up with too much. For example, communative property taught and written on the board rather than commutative. I was dying inside, but of course you can't say anything in that situation.
     
  8. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Apr 7, 2013

    :lol:

    Mine might be considered a script as well, but people have thanked me for the details. I have a one page "At-a-Glance" for the sub so it's not too overwhelming every time they need to refer to it, but then I go into specifics in the following pages.
     
  9. catnfiddle

    catnfiddle Moderator

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    Apr 8, 2013

    Mine might as well be a script because I teach mostly via PowerPoint (nature of the job). I definitely do NOT simply read the email as that would be incredibly boring, but it has the basics.
     
  10. S Dubb

    S Dubb Comrade

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    Apr 21, 2013

    The "making the other teachers look bad" argument is actually a lose-lose in my eyes. I completely agree that nobody should concern themselves with how you choose to conduct your planning. If you have the time to go into your building to plan and that's what works for you, then more power to you! Speaking as an elementary teacher without kids of his own yet, I get it. The amount of time I spend each weekend at home planning for the upcoming week is probably much higher than the majority of those in my building, and I'm in my sixth year of teaching!

    I assume your principal knows you're coming in to plan on Sundays? I haven't read through all five pages of this thread yet. Assuming this is the case, I can see where other teachers would be upset with you for coming in to plan.

    It should be none of their business, but I can see why they are making it so. By you going in on Sundays to work, it "makes them look bad" for not doing what you're doing. For all you/they know, your principal is thinking, "Oh, well DrivingPigeon is coming in on Sundays to get plans ready for the week. If DrivingPigeon can do it, why can't the others?" Is that far-fetched and a bit ridiculous? Absolutely! But it is what it is.

    Not that you should have to, but have you considered planning from home instead of going in to school just to avoid the drama?
     
  11. Rabbitt

    Rabbitt Connoisseur

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    Apr 21, 2013

    In my sub folder, I created a detailed explanation of how the day in my room looks. It explains everything from lining up to Daily 5. I bet it's 15 pages...LOL

    I stay late Friday (Thursday if I have Friday evening plans) and write up on Word a general outline for each day. I have a Word template that looks like a traditional lesson plan book. This week it says something like...
    8:15 Daily math facts
    8:30 Daily 5 round 1
    Small group: tuning into interesting words
    8:50 mini lesson: commas in a series
    9:00 Daily 5 Round 2
    9:20 mini lesson: -le words
    9:30 Daily 5 Round 3
    9:50 Daily 5 Round 4
    10:10 Read aloud Boxcar Children
    10:25 Math Tangram packet
    11:10 lunch

    I also make any necessary copies before I leave Friday.
     
  12. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Apr 21, 2013

    We have to turn them in by 8:00 a.m. on Monday morning. I usually do mine on Thursday before so I can spend Friday's planning making copies for the next week. Our plans have to have common core standards for each lesson. Our principal checks off our name and keeps them in notebooks in her office. We also have turn in our lesson plans at the end of the year.
     
  13. kpa1b2

    kpa1b2 Aficionado

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    Apr 21, 2013

    That sounds like you are turning in a hard copy once a week & then all of your plans at the end of the year. I'm just thinking of all of the paper that takes. I email mine to our P & make a hard copy for myself. I throw the hard copy away at the end of the week.

    I assume that our P keeps track of who emails him their plans. I need to go do that!
     
  14. Shanoo

    Shanoo Habitué

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    Apr 21, 2013

    My lesson plans are literally a point-form list in my plan book. My sister, who was getting her degree last year, called me and ask if I would send her a copy of one of my lesson plans so she could use it as a template. I laughed, said ok, and literally sent her this:

    - mental math
    - go over test
    - adding fractions
    - practice

    She emailed me back with an "Oh. Nevermind." She had asked me because she looked at her cooperating teacher's plans and they were also point-form.

    I have winged it. I lost my USB stick one time with my Smart Notebook files on it. I realized it was gone during my Grade 9 class and had a mini freak out in front of the kids. Their reaction? "Oh well. Guess we can't do math today!" I laughed and said "See this?" and held up a piece of chalk. "This is chalk. It worked without my USB. And my brain? It still knows how to do the math." And, off we went.

    Winging it for me doesn't mean I don't know what I'm doing. For me, it means I don't have flashy things prepared for the kids. It's usually guided practice using examples I make up off the top of my head and then practice out of the book. Not the *best* thing to do, but I don't do it often (I might have done it...twice this year).
     
  15. scarletjones

    scarletjones Rookie

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    Apr 21, 2013

    Hello Everybody!!!!

    Lesson plans are very important indeed. They help you plan things systematically and thereby proceed further in future.
     
  16. applecore

    applecore Devotee

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    Apr 21, 2013

    WOW!

    That's awesome!


    We have to do plans, but they don't have be approved or turned in, yet. The plans have to be present for inspections at any time. Some of us do them 9 weeks at a time to 1 week at a time. I'm somewhere in the middle. I have a 9 week plan with spaces to fill in as we go to adjust what I need to go back and review.

    I keep waiting for that day when the new P decides to turn the tide and require us to have our lesson plans approved by him, but I'm thinking by the number of teachers he has to work with, he's got to keep trusting us that we know what we're doing.
     
  17. mrachelle87

    mrachelle87 Fanatic

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    Apr 21, 2013

    If your plans aren't on her desk by 8:15, you get an email. I have gotten one email this year. I had accidently placed them in another mailbox. I quickly replied to her email, ran to copier, and then sent a child to her office with them. Several emails show up on your evaluation. She is serious about it. And don't forget the objectives. I have been teaching for 20+ years and I still need them.
     

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