Do you call on random kids?

Discussion in 'General Education' started by Mathemagician, Sep 9, 2012.

  1. Mathemagician

    Mathemagician Groupie

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    I do like to call on random kids, and my policy is that I don't like to just give up if they have the wrong answer. I try to work that kid through to the correct answer.

    With that said, apparently the new evaluation system we're using deems you "ineffective" in one of the categories if you only call on kids raising their hands. I think that's a bit harsh, although I do see the point as I'd only be hearing from a small handful of whippersnappers if I didn't call on people randomly. Do you call on people randomly, or just take volunteers?
     
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  3. Caesar753

    Caesar753 Multitudinous

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    Depending on the activity, I might do either. If it's something new and difficult, I'll take volunteers. If it's something I feel like everyone should know, I'll call on students randomly.
     
  4. Linguist92021

    Linguist92021 Phenom

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    It really depends. I might call on a student who raises his hand, especially if he keeps raising it. I know the frustration first hand and have seen it on students who really wanna participate but are not called upon. It's enough for them to stop wanting to be involved.

    I might call on those who never raise their hands but I know they know the answer, those who just sit there, but in this case I'll choose an easier question.
    I also call on those who are off task to redirect them.
    So it just really depends.
     
  5. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    This. Also, when studying literature sometimes I'll ask students to make connections...and sometimes I know not every student would be comfortable sharing how they relate to characterts and situations depending upon the circumstances, so I will often take volunteers then as well.
     
  6. Ima Teacher

    Ima Teacher Maven

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    It varies for me, too. In addition to the situations already given, I also have a category of "prepped" kids, who I've given the question already. I use that with kids who struggle when they are put on the spot.
     
  7. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    I mix it up. I call on raised hands, I pull name sticks. I allow think time...and I rarely ask questions at the 'knowledge' level which require a 'correct' answer. I prefer to ask more critical thinking, meta cognitive, share your thoughts kinds of questions.
     
  8. PinkCupcake

    PinkCupcake Cohort

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    It depends on the situation as previous posters have said. I try to give my kids a heads up that I'll be calling on random people by saying something like, "Let's hear from someone who hasn't had a chance to share yet." I also try not to call immediately one a kid who shoots their hand up first to answer a question. I like to give a few thinking seconds for those who need some extra time to answer.
     
  9. KinderCowgirl

    KinderCowgirl Phenom

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    Regarding the evaluation part-you would probably only be hearing from the brightest kids. I can see them wanting a teacher to engage everyone.

    Like the others, it depends on the question. I want to encourage that participation from everyone, take a risk-give me an answer. I love when they say-oh, I didn't raise my hand. I know, now give me an answer. Otherwise, I'd be calling on the same 5 kids all the time.
     
  10. Ms. I

    Ms. I Maven

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    Although I don't work in a regular classroom full of kids, there's times I ask them questions as a group. I mix it up too. If someone raises their hand, I'll call on them, but I'm sure not going to pick on the same person again for a while. I'll pick on another person. But if no one raises their hand, I'll make sure to pick on everyone before the time's up, so everyone had a chance.
     
  11. HistTchr

    HistTchr Habitué

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    I both call on volunteers and pick kids randomly. It depends on the activity and the type of question for me. I would say I call on hand raisers about 60% of the time, and randomly choose kids to answer questions the other 40% of the time.
     
  12. chebrutta

    chebrutta Enthusiast

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    I never call on kids randomly. Every question I ask in class has time for students to turn and talk while I walk around and listen in; afterwards, I ask for volunteers to tell me what they heard someone say. And my questions are never knowledge-level.
     
  13. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    I use the "Pick Me" app on my iPhone. It gives me a random student AND it keeps track of how many questions they get right or wrong.
     
  14. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    I call on raised hands and random kids. I usually try to call on kids who usually don't raise their hands when I ask an easy question that I know they know. They get the answer right and feel all good about themselves. If I call on a kid and they don't know the answer even after trying to work through it with them, I'll say "would you like to call on someone to help you?" Then they can pick someone who helps them work to the answer.
     
  15. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Read Teach Like a Champion. One of the strategies they suggest is 'no opt out' where you don't allow a student to get out of answering. You always come back to them and have them give the correct answer.
     
  16. FourSquare

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    I've got their names in a jar and I pull kids randomly sometimes. Other times I take hands. The above book (Teach Like A Champion) refers to this as the cold call jar. I like it!
     
  17. Ilovesummer

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    I do both ways, depending on the situation. I have one student this year whose mind is frequently miles away, and so I call on him to bring him back to the task at hand. The first few times I did that, his response was a blank stare and "I didn't raise my hand." My response to him was, "I know. I called on you anyway. I do that sometimes, so you need to be ready." :whistle:
     
  18. treefrogs

    treefrogs Rookie

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    I use faux random calling, and I make it a point to make sure every student is called on everyday. I also sometimes check with students before I ask them to share. This allows me to scaffold a bit if needed, so students aren't embarrassed and feel comfortable sharing.
     
  19. waterfall

    waterfall Maven

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    If it's a really easy "knowledge" question that I think everyone should know, I just ask everyone to say the answer at the same time. Other questions I call on raised hands or sometimes random students. I've been meaning to put together name sticks in a jar but I just haven't gotten around to it yet. Add that to my list of projects this week!
     
  20. Chrissteeena

    Chrissteeena Companion

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    I always hated being called on randomly when I was in school (but only in certain subjects... I was fine in English and Math but I'd freak out about Science and Social Studies). I had some major anxiety about being called on and not knowing the answer.

    I don't think I'd call on students randomly unless I knew they felt comfortable.
     
  21. lucybelle

    lucybelle Connoisseur

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    I remember in my organic chem 2 lab the professor called on me to answer a question. I gave an answer and it was wrong. So I said I didn't know but he continued to hound me about it for a good 5 minutes. Not leading me to an answer, badgering me about why I didn't know. I was soooo embarrassed by the end. :(
     
  22. sizzla_222

    sizzla_222 Companion

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    I do both. I definitely do call on kids randomly a lot though. I only have 11 children in my class of third graders, so I can pick every student throughout the course of a lesson.
     
  23. Peregrin5

    Peregrin5 Maven

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    When I am asking for opinions or asking questions on fairly recent material that not everyone may have a grasp on yet, I will only take volunteers. If I am asking review questions, or reviewing a quiz, or asking someone to read, I may call out randomly, (by using playing cards).
     
  24. Sarge

    Sarge Enthusiast

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    I call on any kid who doesn't look like they are paying attention.

    When I was in school, the only teachers who successfully taught me anything were the ones who did that.
     
  25. dgpiaffeteach

    dgpiaffeteach Aficionado

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    I do both as well. If it's a simple opinion question I'll call on kids. Like if the question is something about first impressions of a character, any kid can answer that. I do take volunteers a lot. Sometimes I'll ask for volunteers who we haven't heard from yet. That usually gets a couple new people.
     
  26. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    I also mix it up. If I decide to randomly call on kiddos, I either pull their stick (a popsicle stick with their number written on it with sharpie) from a cup, or I tell the kids that I want to torture them. The ones actually being tortured are the ones who are dying to raise their hands, lol! But, like others, I always give think time. One thing I've started this year is using cooperative learning structures (aka Kagan). This allows the kiddos to ask and answer questions of each other, and to respond in positive and polite ways. We're not quite there yet, but probably next week, I'll start teaching them how to coach each other when struggling for answers. Using the cooperative learning mechanisms increases student engagement from 1 or 2 students out of (currently) 15, to 25% (1 in 4) or even 50% (working in pairs). It's early yet, but the learning curve does seem to be going up!
     

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