Do You Assess Your Own Children...as in offspring?

Discussion in 'Elementary Education' started by CFClassroom, Aug 20, 2010.

  1. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Aug 20, 2010

    My son is going in to K. While he is not gifted, he certainly does have his wits about him. He also had the benefit of attending an excellent preschool that focused on academics and enrichment.

    He's shown a great deal of interest in reading and writing and so this summer we've been working on that. It's been a casual thing, but it just hit me last week that I have all the tools to assess him and guide his learning the same way I would any of my students.

    So I broke out the DRA kit and developmental spelling lists and all that good stuff.

    It felt a little weird. Kind of like it was over the top. But, at the same time, if we are going to be working on literacy skills it makes sense to have an accurate idea of where he is at to guide instruction.

    I guess I'm just wondering what other teacher moms do.

    Do you assess your own kids? What do you do with that info?
     
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  3. jday129

    jday129 Comrade

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    My friend gave her son the Concepts About Print test. Target score for end of kindergarten is 16. He had that at age 3.
     
  4. gigi

    gigi Groupie

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    I do it with my daughters step-son who is six. I can't help it. He finished K in June reading and comprehending on a first grade level and has taken off during the summer. The only problem is this kid has other problems as well, ADHD and I am confident he has OCD as well.
     
  5. kimrandy1

    kimrandy1 Enthusiast

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    I think we all do it at least on an informal basis, pretty constantly. I've never done the formal stuff, except for when I had my kids in my class, and then I had to, kwim?
     
  6. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Aug 22, 2010

    I did a formal text leveling on my son last spring when he was in pre-K. I did it only because I was really curious about where he was. We read several books together because I estimated way too low. He decided he was "done" (his attention span gave out before his reading skills) and I never did find his true instructional level.

    I also gave him our state's Kindergarten readiness assessment when he was 3.
     
  7. halpey1

    halpey1 Groupie

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    Hmmm - I have to say, if you want to test your own child, that's one thing, but what you do with the information is another issue. I've heard of a parent/teacher (not one of mine) who argued with the teacher about her daughter's score. It was very clear that her daughter had been coached on the DRA stories which really blows the whole test out of the water. I guess my question would be WHY are you doing it? Why not let the teacher, someone who's hopefully non-biased give the test and see what the results are? I'm just curious why a parent would need this information independent of the school? Maybe there is some good reason other than curiosity that I'm not thinking of...
     
  8. terptoteacher

    terptoteacher Connoisseur

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    I've never tested my kids. I knew that they were fine intellectually and I just trusted their teachers would let me know if there was a problem...
     
  9. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    The thought of testing my own children never crossed my mind.
     
  10. sevenplus

    sevenplus Connoisseur

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    Aug 22, 2010


    I would never mention the testing to his teacher and curiosity is exactly why I did it. I was sitting there testing my students and thought, "I wonder how my son would do on this?" And with the text leveling assessment, I was, again, just genuinely curious. If his teacher assesses him and comes out with a different level, I'm not going to argue. And, for the record, his district uses a different assessment system but, just to be on the safe side, I used non-testing books because the last thing I wanted was for him to say, "Oh, I read this book with my mom" and make it seem like I coached him.

    Not that I mean to sound defensive here or that your post was even directed at me. Just wanted to explain my position a bit more. I'm super proud of my boy, just as I am of my students when they make gains. I always am anxious to see what their new level is each time I test and I wanted to see the same with him.
     
  11. teacherheath

    teacherheath Companion

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    Aug 22, 2010

    No, I haven't. I mean, I have a really good idea where he is, just by listening to him read and such. But nothing formal. I'm not gonna lie, though. When his K. teacher tested him last year on the 1st grade stuff, I was DYING to see it, though I remained calm. ;)
     
  12. CFClassroom

    CFClassroom Connoisseur

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    Aug 22, 2010

    In my specific situation, I started assessing my son because he was not yet in Kindergarten and therefore had not had any formal assessment. He is very interested in reading and writing so it is something we are working on. I wanted to make sure we were working with books at his instructional level and while I had an idea of where he was at, I wanted to be sure. We actually stopped using the DRA at my school (where he will be attending) so I felt OK with using that as an assessment tool since it wouldn't alter any future results for him.

    I don't know that a typical parent would need this info, but as a teacher it is useful info to have when working with the child at home.
     

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