Do I tell the principal?

Discussion in 'Debate & Marathon Threads Archive' started by terptoteacher, Aug 27, 2012.

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  1. stephenpe

    stephenpe Connoisseur

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    Aug 28, 2012

    As if this may have never come up before in a school setting. I think a student teacher needs to have some autonomy to see if they can establish that teacher student relationship so important to being a teacher. If anyone failed in this situation it was the administration in not having some standards or procedures to deal with a state standard being taught by a ST. How can someone LEARN to be a teacher without actually doing what a teacher does? This is why I think all this testing is for the birds.
    Testing does not equal learning. The real world is not some standardized test.
     
  2. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Aug 28, 2012

    I'm confused about inconsistencies in your responses.
    You said in response #6 that you had to be out of the room.
    You said in response #12 that the college only required 4 weeks but you gave her 7 solo weeks.
    You said in response #23 that you were going by parameters set up by college, but that isn't quite accurate since they said 4 weeks and you had her flying solo after 3 weeks of observing instead of 6 weeks of observing. Seems she was short changed on the learning process and shoved into teaching 3 weeks early which then allowed you to be out of the room. That doesn't seem as if procedures are being followed to me.

    You said in response #43 that it is standard procedure around there to leave the room. To me that means something very different than this universities procedures specify that they do not want the student teachers being monitored while they are student teaching solo. That to me just doesn't seem right. Observe then do without anyone watching. I'd love to know what university runs their education program that way and then have that program yanked from the school.

    So, my question is, does the university actually say the mentor teacher CANNOT be in the room or does your school interpret the university's standards to mean this thus giving every mentor teacher time to be out of the room as a perk for taking on a student teacher.

    As others have said, I've yet to see a student teacher flying solo with no mentor monitoring. The purpose of monitoring is to take notes regarding things that need to be worked on and improved and without being there to monitor, these student teachers are actually not receiving the instruction that they should be getting during their student teaching experience. Sure, you can sit quietly and not interrupt allowing her to fly solo, but where is that teaching/mentoring if one goes from being observed to not having anyone monitor them?
     
  3. silverspoon65

    silverspoon65 Enthusiast

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    Aug 28, 2012

    As someone who regularly has student teachers, I find this insulting. It's not like I am sipping a latte in the teacher's lounge with my feet up while she is teaching.
     
  4. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Aug 28, 2012

    Perk doesn't necessarily mean that you are doing nothing or sipping coffee with your feet up while you are out of the room. Another meaning could be that you take that time to do other things you couldn't do if you were in the room actually monitoring how the student teacher is doing as she is flying solo or if you were yourself teaching the class. It may mean that you take the time to meet with another teacher that happens to have a special at the same time, make copies, enter data, etc.

    So, if you want to be insulted and insinuate it means sitting back with your feet up and sipping coffee, be my guest. I can't stop you. However, you decided for it to mean that, not me.
     
  5. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Aug 28, 2012

    I was an ST and my teacher left me. She knew that I had been subbing (one of her friends was friends with a teacher I subbed for)...So I was actually alone with the students a lot more than the other ST's in the school.

    We did have weeks of solo, we were to show our lesson plans and they were to help us and then leave it to us. I don't know how this is so weird for college students about to go into classrooms be left alone to teach students?!?! I mean subs come in all the times. In our college we had to do all the background and different test (ie TB) before we were allowed to teach. I didn't have to do TB to be a sub...

    I will say that a2z does have a point, some teachers do use that "perk." I mean I was alone at different points of the day with my st class. My teacher was down chatting it up with a friend. I'm NOT saying all are like that, but there are some who do use that.

    I would agree it in the future it would probably be best not to have a student teacher in a testing grade... but you learned that and can move on. Or maybe not before the test... I know our college had spring and fall semester st opportunities.
     
  6. gregoire

    gregoire Rookie

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    Aug 28, 2012

    Hmm...I won't comment on whether you should or shouldn't talk with your principal, but I will just say my mentor teaching made me teach on my own after the 3rd day and it stayed that way for 10 weeks. And yes, she was relaxing in the lounge. I was too scared to say anything for fear she might fail me. I could have really used the benefit of a mentor teacher and I didn't learn as much as I could have. And this person goes around being called Dr. ____. My head supervisor figured it out by the end though when he keep coming around and my mentor teacher was never there.

    In the end, I did okay by pushing through and working hard. The kids were sad to see me go, they actually thought I was the real teacher!
    I've met some really wonderful mentor teachers over the years and wish I could have worked with them.:)
     
  7. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Aug 28, 2012

    It was standard in the area I did my ST in for the cooperating teacher to leave the room as well. We had to do at least two full weeks where we were responsible for the whole day: attendance, classes, extra duties, etc. We started by observing and then began talking over a few classes/subjects at a time. My CT went over my lessons a few days before and made suggestions, and then we would have time to reflect on them during a prep or after school. However, I created the assessments and did all the grading for those units I taught.

    Many programs have requirements like that where they have to do "at least x weeks" of teaching everything; handing over some subjects earlier is not necessarily a bad thing. My CT could tell I was ready, so she gave me responsibilities more quickly than others may have gotten them.
     
  8. amakaye

    amakaye Enthusiast

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    Aug 28, 2012

    Let me add that the CT was supposed to be out of the room for portions of those two weeks, including at least one full day. This was only after she had observed me over the weeks leading up to that when I was teaching a few subjects. It was in no way "observe, and then teach without anyone watching." We also were observed multiple times by our university supervisors before we fully took over the classroom.
     
  9. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Aug 28, 2012

    There are some people who are so rude in their responses that even if I agreed with them, I wouldn't say so. Yes, yes...sometimes I most certainly do behave like a twelve year old.
     
  10. iteachbx

    iteachbx Enthusiast

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    Aug 28, 2012

    I'm really surprised its such common practice for student teachers who are not employees of the district to be permitted to be left alone with students. As a student teacher I was told by my college to never be alone in the room with the students, and my CT made sure that happened. I had a student teacher this past spring and she was never, ever left alone with the students. She had plenty of time to teach and be in control of the class and I feel like she got a realistic and meaningful experience. IMO it was more meaningful that my co-teacher and I were always with her because when she was in control we were able to see what she was doing well, what she needed to improve on and give her feedback. Ultimately they were our students preparing for state tests and it was OUR responsibility, not hers to make sure they were prepared for every portion of the test. My principal would certainly not want to hear me say "oh well the student teacher taught that lesson."
     
  11. a2z

    a2z Maven

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    Aug 28, 2012

    And being passive-agressive is any better? LOL
     
  12. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Aug 28, 2012

    Maybe a little. :p
     
  13. Rox

    Rox Cohort

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    Aug 28, 2012

    My program required the teacher to leave the room when I did my student teaching. However, my teacher didn't, he said he would just stay in his corner and do some work. But he didn't. Instead, he would constantly interrupt my lessons to tell me what I was doing wrong and it became very frustrating because it was just that he wanted things done HIS way. My friend who was doing student teaching in the same building had a mentor teacher that would sit in a "voting booth", a large cardboard box in the back of the room, and she would fall asleep there. Anyway, I had to have a "certificate of eligibility" before doing it, and while it is not a credential, perhaps that is what qualified me to be alone with students?

    I might make a comment such as: "I realized that the low scores occurred in the area that the ST taught, so I guess next time I'll be sure to follow up/monitor/assess/whatever."
     
  14. geoteacher

    geoteacher Habitué

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    Aug 28, 2012

    In the end, what is taught in your classroom and how it is taught is your responsibility. I would, however, take this as a learning experience, and I would probably mention it to the principal in the hope that change might occur. Perhaps it is not good to take on a student teacher when they might have to teach test-critical information.
     
  15. JustMe

    JustMe Virtuoso

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    Aug 28, 2012

    So...

    Your student teacher sucks. Not "abusively" so, but it's not pretty. What do you do? There is not time to teach everything twice, obviously. And of course you would make efforts to help him or her improve, but if they don't...? If they are to be solo, I'm just not sure how to handle this. I think it is UNFAIR to come down on someone who opened her classroom to a teacher in training when that teacher in training failed to produce stellar scores. Most student teachers are not at the top of their game yet.

    Basically, in summary, the whole system sucks.
     
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