Distribution of IEPs in classrooms

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Preschool0929, Aug 17, 2013.

  1. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2012
    Messages:
    575
    Likes Received:
    109

    Aug 17, 2013

    This might not be the most politically correct question, but I feel frustrated and just want to see how other schools do this. I teach special education preschool in a P-5 school. There are 2 classrooms. The other preschool teacher does not have a special Ed background and was grandfathered in. Every year, our director places almost all SLI students in her classroom and a few DD students who might be low in academics or social skills. In my class, I get all of the OHI, extreme behaviors, and any other student that they feel she can't handle. Last year, I was assured that this year would be different and IEPs would be distributed evenly based on need, so that my classroom wouldn't be so overwhelming. But, that isn't the case. My class has so much need that it's impossible to really help those who need the most help, and I'm often so overwhelmed with the amount of work that I'm constantly stressed and upset.

    Is it wrong to feel like this? I'm not tenured and don't want to continue to complain, but my students aren't being given a fair chance, and neither am I :(
     
  2.  
  3. deefreddy

    deefreddy Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 17, 2013

    It sounds like the director is placing students according to Mild/Mod needs and Mod/Sev needs. Does KY have different credentials for the two types of classrooms?
     
  4. Preschool0929

    Preschool0929 Cohort

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2012
    Messages:
    575
    Likes Received:
    109

    Aug 17, 2013

    Not for preschool. My credential is Early Childhood Special Education. From what all of the adminstration has told me, the other teacher has basically refused to take students with extreme needs and has threatened to leave if they are placed with her, so they all go to me instead.
     
  5. deefreddy

    deefreddy Companion

    Joined:
    Jan 4, 2012
    Messages:
    112
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 18, 2013

    In that case, be happy that the director believes that you can handle it, unlike your whiny co-worker. From experience I can tell you that complaining will get you nowhere, so take on the challenge and be the best teacher you can be under the circumstances.
     
  6. Dr Kevlar

    Dr Kevlar Rookie

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2012
    Messages:
    87
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 19, 2013

    I would add to what deefreddy is saying. While I agree that whining is not the route to take, this should not preclude you from advocating for your kids. If there are resources out there that would help you, identify them and then factually note the reason you need it and how it would help students meet their goals.
     
  7. mrsnoble116

    mrsnoble116 Companion

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2006
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    0

    Aug 25, 2013

    It is unfair. Kind of like the ex-sped teachers gone reg.ed...they get all the behaviors and inclusion. Anyway, many of our teachers get out of your situation by saying their evaluations and scores will affect how the end of the year testing will display their teaching performance. In my state if your class doesn't perform at a pre-determined level, you can get put on probation, so now my principal evens out the behaviors and high/low kids.
     

Share This Page

Members Online Now

  1. Mr.history,
  2. vickilyn
Total: 211 (members: 3, guests: 185, robots: 23)
test