Discouraged

Discussion in 'Job Seekers' started by rpickles, May 1, 2014.

  1. rpickles

    rpickles Rookie

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    May 1, 2014

    I've been lurking through these forums for about a month, and all of your posts have definitely helped me get through the beginning of my first teaching job search. I just finished up my student teaching, I'm graduating with my bachelor's degree in about a week, and I was SO excited to start interviewing for jobs. Now, however, my enthusiasm is dwindling and I'm feeling really discouraged.

    I went on two interviews earlier this month, but both jobs went to someone with more classroom experience, and I haven't heard from anyone since.

    Words of encouragement? Anyone feeling the same way? Tips? I have so many questions...feel free to answer all, none, or only a few:

    - In your experience, what is the "hiring season"?
    - When you got your first teaching job, how many interviews did you go on? When/how did you finally land the job?
    - What can I do to give me a better chance of getting more interviews now that I'm fairly positive I won't be getting hired at either of the two schools that I've interviewed at?

    HELP? :dizzy:
     
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  3. ktmiller222

    ktmiller222 Cohort

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    May 1, 2014

    I got my first teaching job from a career fair.
    To be honest, you need to go into graduate school. Bachelor's degree are nothing anymore in education. Grad school = more experience for your resume.
    Although I taught in another state but moved and having trouble finding a job now. I know that schools will prefer someone who has a higher degree. Most districts in Western PA have 85%+ of their teachers with master degrees or higher. Good luck to you!
     
  4. smalltowngal

    smalltowngal Multitudinous

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    May 1, 2014

    Hiring season varies. Some people have already been hired for next year, but many times schools hire well into August. You have teachers that leave in the middle of the summer or a few weeks/days before school starts.
    After graduation, I went on so many interviews I lost count. It was several though before finally getting hired after attending a job fair.
    If you can sub, sub. This will give you classroom experience, put your face/name out to different schools, and pad that resume up. Getting a masters is a good idea; however, this will make you more expensive in some districts than other new teachers.

    Good luck!
     
  5. rpickles

    rpickles Rookie

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    May 1, 2014

    Unfortunately, grad school isn't really an option financially right now. I applied and was accepted, I just really can't afford it. I will go eventually though. Thanks for replying!
     
  6. OhThePlaces

    OhThePlaces Cohort

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    May 1, 2014

    That hasn't been my experience here in the south. The majority of teachers that I work with do not have a Master's degree. In my district, there's no longer a financial incentive, so most of us can't afford it.

    Rpickles, it just depends on your area. I've landed 3 of the 4 teaching positions that I interviewed for. Once in April right out of college, once in February (After taking 4 years off to stay home with my babies, I was hired mid-year after the other teacher had to retire unexpectedly because of poor health) and again this past May when I switched schools within my district. I know that my district continues hiring through the summer as vacancies become available.

    I think that my biggest strength during interviews is coming off as personable, confident and relaxed (fake it!) Try not to get discouraged yet... It's early May and you have two interviews under your belt. :)
     
  7. DressageLady

    DressageLady Comrade

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    May 1, 2014

    I just wanted to chime in and share that I have been told that a first year teacher with a graduate degree is less desirable than a first year teacher with a B.A. and a "clear" credential. The graduate degree makes you more expensive, and yet you're offering no more experience than the other applicants with a B.A.

    OP, I have no words of wisdom about finding a job. I graduated last year and was not hired as a teacher during last years hiring season (which runs about mid-April to the end of August here).
    Sheilah
     
  8. rpickles

    rpickles Rookie

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    May 1, 2014

    Thank you to everyone who's replied! DressageLady, I have also heard that. I'm not super-concerned about the grad school thing. I'll probably go on my own time, but I really want to get some real experience under my belt. Thank you to everyone who has offered words of encouragement! I realize that it is still VERY early, but I'm paranoid!
     
  9. giraffe326

    giraffe326 Virtuoso

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    May 1, 2014

    - In your experience, what is the "hiring season"? It is regional. Here, as little as 5 years ago, it was February, March, and maybe April. Now postings don't even go up until May or June. In NC, it was usually July or August- after the budgets were finalized.
    - When you got your first teaching job, how many interviews did you go on? When/how did you finally land the job? Three interviews over 2 years and 2 states. I moved 750 miles for my first job. I went through 2 hiring seasons with only 1 interview in MI. And it was pretty much just a courtesy interview.
    - What can I do to give me a better chance of getting more interviews now that I'm fairly positive I won't be getting hired at either of the two schools that I've interviewed at? Broaden your search- distance as well as school types. Diligently look. During the last two hiring seasons, I spent at least 10 hours a week looking for jobs. No exaggeration.
     
  10. MissD59

    MissD59 Comrade

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    May 1, 2014

    This is completely regional. In NYS, you are required to eventually get your masters as a teacher, so it really isn't considered that much of a hinderance. The job market is rough here, and most schools now want multiple certifications for one job, so the only way to obtain those is to continue with your education. I don't personally know of anyone in my area who was hired with their own classroom with just a B.A. right out of school in the past few years.
     
  11. Flanny108

    Flanny108 Rookie

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    May 1, 2014

    I got my first job the week before school started in a school district where nobody wanted to work. I pretty much walked in, she took my pulse, and showed me to my classroom. My next job was in a different district and I did not get any interviews, I got a job as a long term sub, and I was hired from there. Tray not to be discouraged, a good friend of mine kept applying and working as a long term sub in a very desirable district. It took her several years, but she eventually got hired as a classroom teacher.
     

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