Discipline, what to do when positive doesn't work?

Discussion in 'Preschool' started by anna9868, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Sep 28, 2008

    I teach only 2 days a week, for 3 hours, so I don't spend that much with the children. And it's only been a month... anyway
    A problem that I have is that one little boy who throws everything on the floor. He does it so innocently, as if he is an infant still testing how gravity works (he is 2.5 btw). He throws toys, at snacktime he always pulls down a chair next to him. Other children then repeat after him :eek:

    I try to be positive and repeat countless times during the day that we are not throwing: "we don't throw toys" "we don't throw chairs", etc.
    Is there anything else I can try to do to get the message across?
     
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  3. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Sep 29, 2008

    Try logical consequences with him. He might cry at first, but when you follow through he'll understand. I might say, "If you throw the toy, then I get to keep it", or something similar.
     
  4. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Sep 29, 2008

    I thought about it myself. Cannot figure out how to do it in school. They don't really have favorite toys, so they won't care if I take it away.
    And something like chairs, what would I do about them
     
  5. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Sep 29, 2008

    I would try something like, "If you throw the toys, I'll have to take them all away from you." And then do it. If you have to keep him next to you to enable him to follow through, then do it.

    As far as chairs go, again, I'd try the positive redirection first, and then tell him he'll have to sit on the floor even if everyone else is sitting in a chair.
     
  6. PennStateCutie

    PennStateCutie Companion

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    Sep 29, 2008

    I was just going to say that he could sit on the floor, also..."if you can't show me that you know the right way to use a chair, you won't get to sit in one at all!" Be firm - it appears as though he has gotten away with too much before and he's testing his limits with you...
     
  7. lex

    lex Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2008

    This works well for me...I point out the kids that are following directions. When we line up to go outside I will say "Billy is a good listener!, Susie is a good listener!, etc." and all the kids will run to line up to be praised too. You could make a big deal about the kids that are sitting in their chairs.
    I also give out hand stamps for kids that are listening, following directions, helpers, etc.
     
  8. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Sep 29, 2008

    I think for a child who's only 2 and a half, though, they don't quite get that. They need immediate feedback that's geared just towards them. They can't quite get the extrapolation of a different situation ont themselves yet. Eventually they will, but at this age it's very very rare.
     
  9. lex

    lex Rookie

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    Sep 29, 2008

    I'm sorry but I have no idea what this means. If this is in response to my suggestion, I work with 2.5-3's as well and praising the children that are following directions works great for us.
     
  10. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Sep 29, 2008

    Well, that's just my experience working with 2 and a half year olds in my space.
     
  11. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Sep 30, 2008

    I talked to one of my co-workers today, and she suggested to try a "punishment" system: tell the boy, if you keep throwing chairs, then we are not going to the playground, the whole class stays inside.

    What do you think about that solution? After I thought about it, I don't like it. It's not fair to the other children, and I think they are too young for that. I don't think 2.5 year olds can make such far going conclusions "If John doesn't listen to the teacher, then we all stay inside"
     
  12. anna9868

    anna9868 Habitué

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    Lex, I really like both of your suggestions! Stamps is a great idea, provided that the children would not be afraid of it. Who knows, the same boy who is throwing chairs didn't want to do figerpainting when we did it, only using a brush.

    And praising others is something that I always forget to do even though I know I should (my husband even complains that I constantly find things to scold him for, and rarely praise him :(
     
  13. tracykaliski

    tracykaliski Connoisseur

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    Anna, if it were me, I wouldn't do it. 2.5 years is too young for a situation like this. I can do it with my kindergartners, but not with little ones like this. They're still so very egocentric, it wouldn't make sense to any of them.
     
  14. erh3794

    erh3794 Rookie

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    Oct 1, 2008

    if i was in your situation,
    i would tell the boy "if you throw this ___again. your going to have ____mins away from your play time"
    and dont back down on it either.
    you could always take the chair away.
    thats a good idea.
    But if it gets so out of hand, why dont you just point it out to the parents?
     
  15. PennStateCutie

    PennStateCutie Companion

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    Oct 1, 2008

    I agree w/ all of the above...the parents need to be in on the game plan (even if they're not supportive, at least make documentation that you're addressing the issue). You know, I think that removing the child from playtime and actually making him SEE what he's missing is more effective than having the whole class miss due to his behavior anyway...if they all miss, they aren't at the age where they can understand WHY they would miss because of someone else's poor choices, and he isn't able to see how his actions affect others yet either...
     
  16. WaProvider

    WaProvider Fanatic

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    Oct 1, 2008

    Plus, the others in class have a certain amount of stress now after watching that they must expell-or you may have a whole class w/issues of one time or another.

    Keep working, listening to what you hear here and document. The solution will come to you soon.

    Keep your director posted as well.
     
  17. Maxadoodle

    Maxadoodle Comrade

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    Oct 2, 2008

    If your situation is a preschool, perhaps the boy isn't ready for school yet. Perhaps he could start again in January, or next year when he is 3. Many boys at 2.5 are simply too young for preschool.
     
  18. Master Pre-K

    Master Pre-K Virtuoso

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    Oct 3, 2008

    I'm with tracy and max on this one...

    I think my busybodies are very egocentric. Some are 3, 4 and 5! They are either the oldest, or youngest or only child. Whatever I say or do, it's all about them. When I say anything, they say, "What about me?!" Most interrupt me constantly, talking over me, like a broken record (scratched cd :rolleyes:) And won't stop until I say something to them. Consequences mean nothing to them. Sometimes they stop, and go right back to what they want to do.

    I have said, "Is there anybody else in this room besides you?", and they actually look around."

    It tires me out because they talk constantly, and will not hush up for anything. They see no reason to do so.

    I can say, I want this, and they say, "I want that too teacher." they have to say something every time I say something.

    Is it rude and wrong for me to not respond or ignore them...once in awhile? :|

    I have one child who feels he needs to be the center of attention, and apparently so does the rest of the building! Everyone stops us in the hall to talk to him. I tried to stop them, but they won't stop either! :confused: where are their teachers? And why do they feel they can't talk to other kids, but they can talk to mine? Because they are little and cute???

    my vent... :(

    I think that's part of it...they probably are used to this type of attention at home... or worse, just the opposite.
     

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