discipline question...

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by clcucf75, Apr 25, 2007.

  1. clcucf75

    clcucf75 New Member

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    Apr 25, 2007

    Hey, just in need of a little advice.

    I have a student in my 3rd grade class who is incredibly attention seeking; whether it be positive or negative. He is incredibly intelligent but can't focus and tends to constantly get out of his seat and bother other students. He'll make clicking noises, whistle, call out, etc during class time, when all the other students are on task. The other students in my class turn around and tell him to "shhhh." I find myself constantly saying his name. I am getting really annoyed with him and quite frankly have lost all patience for his behavior, since I know that he knows exactly what he is doing. I have a behavior system, using a color chart, but it makes no difference to him. He never does his h/w nor does he bring his planner or back pack half the time. He si constantly asking to go to the nurse for something, and if I say no, he will bor so his work. I am wondering how to cope with his behavior in class; how do I get him to stop such behaviors without being too negative? I feel the more I say his name for him to stop a behavior, the more he will do something. He responds to positive feedback, but I find myself having a harder and harder time saying nice things to him. I need to think of some consequences, or ideas to deal, and for me to not let myself get into a state because of this one student... its amazing how one student can change the dynamic of a classroom...
    Thanks
     
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  3. usfmeghi

    usfmeghi Companion

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    Apr 25, 2007

    Have you talked to the parents? Tehy can be a HUGE help.
     
  4. MissBanger

    MissBanger Rookie

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    Apr 25, 2007

    I empathize with you! I have TWO of those in my class this year! I am also 3rd grade.

    Have you tried doing a Daily Behavior Report Card with him? You can generate one very easily at www.interventioncentral.com. I have found this VERY helpful with my two. I only use it with those two students.

    Or start making tallies every time he is disturbing class with his wiggliness or noises. If he keeps it under X amount of times at the end of the day or the end of the week, give him a small treat. This also helps my super wiggly one!

    Also, just browse through that website. There are a lot of pointers for ALL behaviors!

    Hope it works out! Let me know how it goes :)
     
  5. nc4th

    nc4th Rookie

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    Apr 26, 2007

    I am a fourth grade teacher and I have a FUN FRIDAY once a month. This is just recess with only a few extra minutes added on but they can only participate in the fun activity if they get 5 or less card flips in that month. I have done different activities for fun Friday such as a popcorn party, talent show, kickball with another class. The students that are unable to participate are either in studyhall or they walk the track instead of playing the game. It seems to control my misbehaving students. Also I keep a chart up with their colors for the month so they know how many flips they have left. Hope I was helpful.
     
  6. clcucf75

    clcucf75 New Member

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    May 9, 2007

    Thankyou sooo much
     
  7. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    May 9, 2007

    I am also 3rd, and I have 2 of these! Though one sounds more similar to yours.

    I am just the assistant, so I don't get much say in the class, but the teacher deals with it by being very strict, at one point the kid spent quite a bit of time in the principal's office. I think maybe it helped a little, but it wasn't so effective.

    I think what I would do for this kid is give her work to do independently when she's not paying attention to the teacher. Something that covers what the class is learning (she is very smart, but her shenanigans cause her to miss a lot of things) but with a more challenging and interesting level. As often as possible, I'd try to have it include something she can produce or figure out on her own, I think that would make her take her work more seriously since she's not big on doing what the teacher says because she says so! I'd also tell her that I will only continue to give her the "special" work if she maintains good grades -- as an incentive for her to actually do most of the classwork, which she is perfectly capable of doing.
     
  8. Amers

    Amers Cohort

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    May 9, 2007

    I haven't done this before, but I've heard of teachers who have a desk in the back of the room facing away from the other students. Sometimes they have barriers around the desk too, so the student at the desk cannot see his/her classmates, and they can't see him. When the student acts up, send him to the desk. When he is back there, tell the other students to completely ignore him. You ignore him too. If the only attention he can receive is positive attention when he is with the whole class, and he is ignored altogether when is misbehaving, maybe this will help his behavior. I know it has worked for some teachers. Maybe it will work for you too? (I don't think I did the best job explaining the idea, but hopefully you get the gist of it!)
     
  9. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    May 9, 2007

    well if you know the kid needs attention...

    first thing in the morning give a couple minutes, and then make sure to "check-in" with him every so often.

    Try to find any antecedents.

    Move around the room and linger by his desks at times where you feel he needs the attention.

    If you decide to go with rewards though I have heard lunch with teacher is always a goal for which attention seekers will always strive.
     
  10. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    May 9, 2007

    I'm a little surprised..

    that no one has suggested this child be tested for ADHD. What you describe is almost identical to the way my daughter acted before she was diagnosed! If he has ADHD and is not medicated or taught coping mechanisms, there's not much that will help. You can try giving him a "squeezy" ball to occupy his hands while you are instructing. Sending to the office or another classroom on an errand (i.e. with a note saying "Name needed a quick break. Thank you.") will give him a break from sitting. Getting your entire class up and moving for about 2 minutes will do the entire class good. Yes, these kids need discipline -- in fact they thrive much more with a structured environment. However, discipline without meds and/or coping mechanisms is futile.

    Oh, and don't forget to give him praise (for every 1 no, give 10 yesses or good boys). With the many times you are calling his name for a negative, he needs positive reinforcement.
     
  11. SmileBright

    SmileBright Rookie

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    May 10, 2007

    I was going to make a camment about ADD as well. This sounds a lot like I was in elementary school. Do him a favor and talk to his parents about it. No one did with me, and I wasn't diagnosed until I was in high school.

    The other thing is that if ADD or ADHD is the case, try to keep in mind that he doesn't mean to drive you or the rest of the class nuts. He doesn't mean to do it, it's just how he is.
     
  12. dillpickle

    dillpickle Rookie

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    May 10, 2007

    I had one that I let run errands or assist me during my lesson if he was getting antsy. It really helped him focus on the lesson if he had a specific job to do in it. Keep in contact with the parents so they know what's going on in school. I know at my school you can't tell the parents their child needs to be tested b/c then you could end up paying for it! I'd refer him to the counselor as well and document EVERYTHING you've done to help him focus, learn, thrive, etc in your classroom
     
  13. dillpickle

    dillpickle Rookie

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    May 10, 2007

    Oh yeah...sitting with me at lunch was a huge deal for my class. Try that too
     
  14. h2omane

    h2omane Comrade

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    May 10, 2007

    If you are going to talk to the parents about ADD or ADHD testing ,refer to this quote about ADHD students:

    You have a race car engine, but your breaks don't work very well.

    It puts things into the parents head that their kid as fantastic but there is one thing that need to be fixed... the brakes.

    Hope this helps,

    Mr. Skinner :D
     
  15. MrsC

    MrsC Multitudinous

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    May 10, 2007

    Love the quote, h2omane! It describes many of my students perfectly!
     
  16. pwhatley

    pwhatley Maven

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    May 10, 2007

    Good one, h2omane! My daughter's doctor told us that it's like sending a 2 year old into a horribly messy room and telling them "clean it up." What the Ritalin did for my daughter was like sending the 2 year old into the room and helping them pick up the dolls first, puzzles second, and so forth. And no, she wasn't 2 years old, she was 6. He was just making an analogy.
     

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