Differentiating instruction

Discussion in 'Special Education' started by Bored of Ed, Sep 9, 2007.

  1. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Sep 9, 2007

    Do you do it? How does it work?

    I have learned plenty of theories about DI, done exercises in lesson planning, etc, but now that I have my own class I just cannot figure out how to make it happen. And I have to -- fast.

    I have two ELL -- almost no English comprehension or speech.
    One off-the-charts, off-the-wall, totally unfocused ADHD (maybe PDD?)
    Two non-readers but otherwise OK, about 2-3rd grade level on things besides for reading.
    One kid I haven't met yet.

    All boys, ages 10-11, non-readers. Mostly ESL if any English at all.
    I need to differentiate; I can't think of any way to address all of them at once!

    It doesn't help that I have no experience or training in ESL.

    Any advice is welcome!:thanks:
     
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  3. kidatheart

    kidatheart Habitué

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    Sep 15, 2007

    There is going to be a prof development program in Philly on this subject in November. I think I'm going to request to go to it.

    Have lots of folder activities/centers that they can work on when you are with another child. It limits the interruptions a little especially if you really drill the procedure into the kids (no interuptions while I'm working with someone, try to solve it on your own or quietly ask a classmate first)
    Here's an example of what I did for math yesterday -
    1. general instruction for whole group about place value.
    2. pass out a computation worksheet (+-x/) for practice.
    3. work with student 1 to review place value on his level. He's my lowest and got a 2nd grade level worksheet.
    4. work with students 2/3 on place value using about a late 3rd level worksheet.
    5. work with student 4/5 on their level, about 4th/5th grade.
    As I went from small group to small group, the others worked on either the review computation sheet or the place value sheet we reviewed. I also had math folder games (restaurant math, money, or time). This kept everyone busy for the most part... I too have 3 really distractable kids, so there is some redirection going on.
    Now this is just during my pullout time, they also go to the regular math class and I just try my best to keep them on track there.
     
  4. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Sep 15, 2007

    OK... I think I see my problem now: I don't think my kids are capable of doing independent work for long enough to allow me to work individually. First of all, they totally don't read or write (two kids can do their names...) so I would need to verbally give them all directions, which may not be the same for all. Secondly, of those directions, I don't think they can process complex things all at once, I need to give it to them one step at a time or they forget half of it or do it in the wrong order. Third, only one of them seems to have an attention span long enough to keep him focused on his work for more than three seconds.

    HELP?!
     
  5. kidatheart

    kidatheart Habitué

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    Sep 16, 2007

    That is a tough situation. I do not envy your position!!!
    10 years old is 4th or 5th grade, right? wow

    Right now, you may need to focus on getting the whole group on the same page as far as procedures/rules, etc. Group work with reciting the alphabet and words that start with each letter (especially for the ell students). Slowly add in activities that they can do on their own, even if they are only 5 minute activities.

    How about picture prompts as directions? Each one can be slightly differentiated...

    Give them tasks that you know they CAN do. give the 2-3 grade level students a word search that uses vocab or spelling words. Give a student a paper with those words written in a column and have them copy them two times each... just little things that will give you some individual time with the others.

    Are the esl students speaking the same language? How about making flash cards of typical items and putting them on a ring. Then record your self saying the words to match the pictures? You can use words that they need to know like sink, tissue, pencil, etc.
     
  6. Bored of Ed

    Bored of Ed Enthusiast

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    Sep 17, 2007

    I'm not working on spelling and such with them -- they have reading specialists dealing with it. Most of these kids have been in this school for quite a while and their reading level is still like beginning kindergarten. I feel so bad for them, it's so frustrating.

    Anyway, most of the kids speak the same first language, which I am far from fluent in but I can understand it somewhat (I can usually tell when their side conversations have nothing to do with our topic...)

    The tape idea sounds good. I will have to get to work on that.
     
  7. kidatheart

    kidatheart Habitué

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    Sep 17, 2007

    Best of luck with it!
     

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