different ways to get the same sum....

Discussion in 'Elementary Education Archives' started by love2teach, Nov 9, 2006.

  1. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    Nov 9, 2006

    My kiddos are having a hard time with this one....it is so abstract (i guess?) I am looking for a book or some kind of real hands on way to reinforce this one....
     
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  3. TeacherGroupie

    TeacherGroupie Moderator

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    Nov 9, 2006

    What age are the kiddos in question? Can you give an example of a sum they'd be working with?
     
  4. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    first grade
    We are working on sums to 10 for example you can find 10 by adding 10+0 8+2 9+1 etc.....
     
  5. Miss Kirby

    Miss Kirby Fanatic

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    Nov 9, 2006

    Give them a stick of ten base ten blocks. Have them pratice subtracting one, nine are left, subtracting two, eight are left, etc. You could get those plates with sections. Give them ten counters. Put all of them in a section, then take three and and pull them down to a bottom section. How many are left? seven.
     
  6. IPinPa

    IPinPa Rookie

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    Nov 9, 2006

    money
     
  7. vsimpkins

    vsimpkins Comrade

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    Nov 9, 2006

    Shake the beans, Math Their Way. Can be used for Add or Sub.
     
  8. teachingmomof4

    teachingmomof4 Groupie

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    Nov 10, 2006

    You could give them connecting cubes and have them use a different beginning number each time.
     
  9. grade1teacher

    grade1teacher Companion

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    Nov 10, 2006

    Maybe you can count towards something that is 10 days away - someones birthday, a vacation.... Day before you begin, say - we are exactly 10 days away from_____________. Each day we are going to count how many says we have left."
    Next day: "1 day has passed - How many days left? (9). Right, thats because 1+9=10.
    Today 2 days have passed. How many to go? (8). Thats because 2+8=10.
    Keep a list of these number sentences so that they see the pattern.
    Is that too confusing?
     
  10. Aliceacc

    Aliceacc Multitudinous

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    Nov 10, 2006

    Give them 10 counters. Have them split them into 2 groups, and write down the number in each group.

    Now ask that the first group be smaller...even smaller...really small...really big and so on. See what they get, and what their classmates get.
     
  11. czacza

    czacza Multitudinous

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    Nov 10, 2006

    Those color chips that are red on one side yellow on the other (can also do with heads and tails). Get ten of the chips/coins- shake in a cup and dump out. Draw a picture of what you see (4 red, 6 yellow) and write an equation to go with it: 4+6=10. Have them repeat and record 10 equations with a partner. Gather and record all the different equations that they discovered. Explore which ones may not have been found.
     
  12. love2teach

    love2teach Enthusiast

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    Nov 10, 2006

    thanks for the ideas!! I like the color chip ideas...i have red and white ones.....
    I was doing it with the cubes and some were still confused...i think the having 2 different colors will be helpful!
     
  13. Miss W

    Miss W Phenom

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    Nov 10, 2006

    Using 2 colors does make a difference. If your connecting cubes are all different colors, spend some time separating them into those colors. Then fill a baggy for each child with 10 of one color and 10 of another color. That way it's ready to go for them. Then use your connecting cubes to show the concept. As you do it, create a graph using the connecting cubes. The students then color their graph where the connecting cubes are. They will begin to see the effects of the graph as they go. This way you get 2 concepts at once too.
     
  14. DizneeTeachR

    DizneeTeachR Virtuoso

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    Nov 10, 2006

    We had 2 hands on like a place at & the kids were given a certin number of beans buttons or whatever & had a sheet ith an L column + R column. They had to move the pieces to come up with different ways. You might get 8+2 = 10 then 2+8=10 or awhole list of numbers used once depending how much time they were given. We used it as a center.
     
  15. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    Nov 10, 2006

    To get the idea of WHY we use it, use real life problems to start with. Max has 8 pencils. (GIve them to Max). He broke 2 pencils (break two of them). Ask them what they do with broken pencils? (Throw them away). Then ask how many he has left. Show the work in subtraction terms on the board. Do many examples of this. Then use counters for your next step. Then other finger/head methods. Practice the terms (in all, left, etc) so they can identify which to use. Etc. Etc. Etc. HAHAHA! When they start to get it you can play addition bingo (then addition subtraction) to get them excited and going again.
     
  16. Ms.T

    Ms.T Comrade

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    Nov 10, 2006

    I did my book of 10's facts with my 2nd graders. Make a book with 8.5x11" paper folded in half. They have to draw and write the number model on the pages for 10's facts.
    So, for example, the first page would be 10+0=10. Second page 9+1=10. Then 8+2=10 and so on. They can draw what they want (they might draw 2 dogs and 8 dogs, or whatever).
    Then they keep it in their desk as a reference. Have more advanced students do a follow-up book - my book of 20's facts.
     
  17. Upsadaisy

    Upsadaisy Moderator

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    Nov 11, 2006

    The 10s addition facts are sooooo important. They help later on in mental math processes.

    Give each student 10 manipulatives and ask them to separate them into groups. Any amount in any number of groups. Make a big deal of seeing how many different combinations the class produced. Make a chart on the board. 'Does anyone have something else??? Wow, there are so many different ways to find the sum of 10!! You guys are so imaginative. Let's see if I can list them in some kind of order.'

    I would worry a bit about using manipulatives separated into just two groups because that is exactly what they probably will do later on when exploring multiplication facts.
     

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