Different Discipline plans?

Discussion in 'Behavior Management' started by LATechTeacher, May 14, 2007.

  1. LATechTeacher

    LATechTeacher Companion

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    May 14, 2007

    Right now my team uses a conduct chart that we mark in anytime they break a rule. The parent's sign it each night and we check it every day. 3 marks in one day and they sit out for recess. I was just wondering about some other discipine plans teacher's use? I know of the pulling cards system too. Anything else that works???
     
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  3. Tigers

    Tigers Habitué

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    May 14, 2007

    well there beads, traffic lights, money, names on the board...but that work...no. Teacher's happen to make systems work and then erroneously think it was the system that worked...You don't need any of these.
     
  4. synapse

    synapse Comrade

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    May 14, 2007

    Why are you using the system?

    What are the troubling behaviors and who are the troubling students?
     
  5. Paulito

    Paulito Rookie

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    May 19, 2007

    I agree; a system is made good by a very strong and positive expectation on the part of the teacher, that THIS IS the way we behave in this classroom, and we will all be happier when we do.

    A child should not be weighing two courses of action, like "If I do this [behavior] then this [negative consequence] will happen, but I don't care; I'm willing to pay that price."

    Instead of that, a child should feel a very strong expectation that we will be courteous, respectful, and obey the rules. IF NOT, then there will indeed be consequences, and the child might not even know what they will be. Or the class could help write the consequences together.
     
  6. Oceanus

    Oceanus Guest

    May 20, 2007

    Read this Article by Alfie Kohn:

    LEARNING MAGAZINE

    October-November 1995

    Discipline Is The Problem -- Not The Solution
    By Alfie Kohn


    When things in my classroom hit bottom, there were days when I was convinced that the kids stayed up nights plotting ways to make my life miserable. It was only later that I realized their disruptions were basically just intended to make the time pass faster.

    And it was later still before I could admit that I didn't blame them. The problem wasn't with the students -- it was my curriculum and my reliance on textbooks, worksheets, and a diet of disconnected facts and skills. Did I really expect my students to be eager to learn about "Our Friend the Adverb"? Given these types of assignments, it would have been amazing if they hadn't acted up.

    Of course, most articles on disciplining students would brush aside such reflections. Instead, they'd remind me that it's my right to demand that the students act "appropriately" -- which is to say, do whatever I tell them. They'd offer an assortment of tricks to get the students to comply with my wishes. In fact, the whole field of classroom management amounts to techniques for manipulating students' behavior.

    This is awfully convenient for teachers because it takes for granted that the fault lies completely with the children. But consider:

    * Maybe when there's a problem, we should focus not only on the child who doesn't do what he's asked, but also on what he's being asked to do (and how reasonable it is).

    * Maybe when a student is off task, the right question to ask isn't "How do I get him back on?" but "What's the task?"

    * Maybe when a student does something inappropriate, we should look at the climate of the classroom that we have helped to create.

    Working with students to build a safe, caring community takes time, patience, and skill. It's no surprise, then, that discipline programs fall back on what's easy: punishments ("consequences") and rewards.

    Do they work? Yes and no. Threats and bribes can buy a short-term change in behavior, but they can never help kids develop a commitment to positive values. In a consequence-based classroom, students are led to ask, "What does she want me to do, and what happens to me if I don't do it?" In a reward-based classroom, they're led to ask, "What does she want me to do, and what do I get for doing it?"

    Notice how similar these two questions are. Rewards and punishments are really two sides of the same coin. And notice how different either one is from what we'd like children to be thinking about: "What kind of person do I want to be?" or "What kind of classroom do we want to have?"

    To help kids engage in such reflection, we have to work with them rather than doing things to them. We have to bring them in on the process of making decisions about their learning and their lives together in the classroom. Children learn to make good choices by having the chance to choose, not by following directions.

    Suppose it's been taking a long time for your class to get settled after returning from lunch. What are your options? You could threaten to take away a privilege or humiliate the slowest kids. You could dangle the equivalent of a doggie biscuit in front of the class if things improve tomorrow. Or you could set up one child as an example to manipulate the behavior of everyone else ("I like the way Doreen is taking her seat so quickly!").

    All of these "doing to" strategies are about demanding obedience, not about helping kids think their way through a problem -- or pondering why what's happening might even be a problem in the first place. As a result, the need for discipline and control never ends.

    But what if you engaged the students in thinking for themselves?: How long is it taking us to get settled? Why? What can we do about that? This approach saves time in the long run, reduces the number of problems, and ultimately gets kids started thinking their way through their problems.

    Each time I visit such a classroom, where the teacher is more interested in creating a democratic community than in maintaining her position of authority, I'm convinced all over again that moving away from consequences and rewards isn't just realistic -- it's the best way to help kids grow into good learners and good people.
     
  7. Kteacher06

    Kteacher06 Companion

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    May 21, 2007

    Wow - I really like that article. I just don't know how to put it into play in the classroom.
     
  8. wdwteach

    wdwteach Cohort

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    May 21, 2007

    I use a card pulling chart but we rarely have to use it. I have a brag chart (bears). They get a bear sticker every time they get a compliment in the hallway, cafeteria, PE, Art, or Music, fire drill, and even from me. They get double stickers if I have a substitute. I Have the kids color a small paper bear ticket every day to match their behavior chart bear and I staple it to their work each day. It is a quick visual for parents to see how their day was. I only write something on it if they change a ticket and I talk quickly to the child about what it says.
     
  9. trulyblssd

    trulyblssd Companion

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    May 22, 2007

    I live by the fact that we don't know everything that happens in a persons life to make them act the way that they do! I walk, stand and breathe by that! However; instead to blaming the teaching and suggesting that we are doing something to creative behavioral problems is nonsense!

    I had a student who was sleeping in class (no one else was sleeping) and I asked him to wake up. He told me, "that's Bull*&^%". I sent him to the office. Is that my fault somehow?

    I deal with 15-17 year olds all day. I love them dearly and I truly love my job, but I don't have to put up with behavior issues, but I do. I am very patient with these kids. At the age that they are at they have to learn to become responsible young adults. They can't talk to you anyway they want, draw on desks, lie and deliberately disobey the rules. The behavioral issues that I have cannot be equated to the climate of my classroom and even if you could say my “lesson was boring so that’s why I acted out”….Life is boring at times and we all have to deal with it. We have to help out students become productive citizens and if we allow them to place blame on everyone else I shiver to think of them in the workforce in 2-3 years.

    These are at home issues. Ask them how they talk to their parents and you’ll see why they think they can talk to teachers the way they do!

    Those are just my thoughts!
     
  10. cutNglue

    cutNglue Magnifico

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    May 22, 2007

    I think a lot goes into classroom mangement. Most of it is designing the classroom environment/structure and the materials with the students in mind. They can't have everything their way but preventive maintence goes a long way. Knowing your students and where their invididual (or your) line is helps. Positive reinforcement systems, in my opinion, are more for teachers to help see how the positives in each child throughout the day so they can make positive compliments and adjustments to keep them there. I know when I have to try harder to see what each kid does, it makes a difference to how I feel about the day as well. When we see kids repeatedly doing wrong, it is easier to see that than to take a harder look and see where they are actually making improvements. The kids like it because they like our approval.
     
  11. trulyblssd

    trulyblssd Companion

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    May 22, 2007

    It's funny because the student that was mentioned above hated me for awhile. That's normal, but he now loves me. When I kicked him out the day it was for the day. He was rude and disrespectful. It was warranted that he leave and suffer consequences. When he came back we had a talk and I never treated him any differently. I think that made a difference for him. I didn't write him off. Maybe he was having a bad day, who knows?

    I just had my students do a quick write on a life lesson that they learned this year. He actually wrote that he learned a valuable lesson in that he knows now that he cannot talk to adults anyway that he wants to, in particular teachers. He said that he learned he will never win and it will make high school much more difficult to get through.

    Lesson learned! :)
     
  12. Amers

    Amers Cohort

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    May 23, 2007

    I try to focus on rewarding students who are on task. I think it's more effective to focus on the positive things happening in the classroom. For example, a system I really like (5th grade) involves tickets. When a student is exceeding expectations or is the only student on task, they receive a ticket. Tickets go into a jar. At the end of the week, a set number of tickets are drawn, and the students whose tickets are pulled get some sort of small prize (I know some people are anti-prize, but oh well.). When students see others getting tickets, they try to get their own tickets by redirecting their own behavior. Will this work for all classes? No, but it does work for some. Like I said, as much as possible, I like to focus on the positive....and yes, I know this is not always possible! :)
     

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